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Questions tagged [intransitive]

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He reached into his pocket for a dime

He reached into his pocket for a dime. Can I replace the sentence above as below? He reached for a dime into his pocket. or Into his pocket, he reached for a dime.
gomadeng's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
63 views

Can "reduced" be used as an intransitive verb when used in the sentence "the failures have reduced"?

A coworker bet me 20€ that this sentence is correct: The test failures have reduced. However, in my opinion "reduced" is an exclusively transitive verb, which means that an accusative ...
Luca's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
57 views

Transitive and intransitive verbs, parallelism and object [closed]

This is my second question marked to be closed. If I knew the language very well, I wouldn't ask any questions here. I removed the original question. Let the moderators write the question here the way ...
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is "the Fed sells government bonds" ambiguous?

Source Why is the Government Buying Long-Term Bonds? When Fed policymakers decide that they want to raise interest rates, the Fed sells government bonds*. the Fed sells government bonds Does that ...
Gamal Thomas's user avatar
  • 2,099
-2 votes
1 answer
39 views

She went to sleep. (to inf. vs. preposition to)

She went to sleep. to inf. : She went (somewhere) in order to sleep. preposition to : She fell asleep. Which one is more likely at the first glance of the sentence above if you are a native English ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,656
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

How is it possible the verb "mean" be intransitive in "How do you mean?"?

It's explained here what "How do you mean?" means. But I can't understand how it's possible the verb "mean" be intransitive in this sentence. Dictionaries don't give any its ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
93 views

Could "run late" and "run out of something" be transitive verbs

I know "run late" and "run out of something" are usually intransitive verbs. But could "run late" and "run out of something" be "transitive verbs"? ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar