Questions tagged [intransitive-preposition]

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transitive verb “distract”

I learned and know that the transitive verb must go with object, and some verbs contain both transitive and intransitive but others only have transitive and intransitive, respectively. and the verb ...
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1answer
275 views

worry and worry about

I learned the word worry contains two functions: one is as a transitive verb and the other is an intransitive verb. However, in this two sentences, (from TOEFL) People have a variety of ...
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1answer
183 views

Can I use repeat as intransitive verb?

okay I give up, original sentence was this from my writing: "Now that you have read the insights, in order to move on to the future, you would be better off if you now leave them behind. There will be ...
2
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1answer
560 views

This earring “menaces with spikes of…”: is the earring just dangerous or menacing?

This is a native aluminum earring. All craftsmanship is of the highest quality. It is studded with bismuth bronze and decorated with water buffalo leather. This object is adorned with hanging ...
2
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2answers
526 views

Can I say “He is down” in the following context: “He is down, in the ground floor”?

I live on third floor in the hostel of the university, and sometimes friends ask me about other friend "where is he", and I know that he is on the ground floor. So my question is if I can say to them ...
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1answer
88 views

what does “up” stand for in the following sentence?

OP: US GDP for the second quarter was revised sharply higher at an annualised rate of 3.7%, up from the first estimate of 2.3%. In the sentence above, does it equal: US GDP for the second ...
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1answer
34 views

from 1949 on — meaning

Example: The third wave of immigration came from 1949 on, after the Second World War. At that time, Australia’s government made the decision to start a major immigration program, as Australia’s ...
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2answers
116 views

Is “come in” a phrasal verb in “Can I come in?”

Is "come in" a phrasal verb in "Can I come in?". Any suggestion appreciated. Thank you!
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1answer
936 views

Pour In On / Pour Into

I have a question about the usage of the phrase "pour in" here: Carter announced on Aug. 3 that he had surgery to remove a small mass from his liver. Good wishes poured in on social media after ...
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1answer
346 views

I am wondering what “back” means here?

A. He backs. B. He is back. C. he will be back What is the difference in meaning between these?
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1answer
877 views

Is “get back” a phrasal verb in “I have to get back to work”?

For me, it sounds like it is. I would like to know your opinion though. In this sentence: "I have to get back to work.", 'get back' means to return. If I understand correctly when we pronounce phrasal ...
3
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2answers
267 views

“He threw around a slipper” — Meaning of “threw around”?

In the context of a young Singaporean boy having a temper tantrum, does this sentence mean the boy threw the slipper and picked up the slipper then threw it again? He threw around a slipper. From ...
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3answers
6k views

In “Give it here!”, is “here” a pronoun, adverb, preposition, or what?

In the American regionalism, "Give it here!" (i.e. Pass that thing my way -> in my direction -> Give it to me) Questions: What part of speech is the word "here"? That is, is it a pronoun, adverb,...
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1answer
63 views

a report out Monday that… How should I understand “out”?

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/police-team-turns-back-ukraine-crash-101904675.html The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a report out Monday that at least 1,129 people have been killed ...
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1answer
171 views

Who calls 'where' a preposition?

6 The fused relative construction ▓ Classification An initial illustration of the range of constructions belonging to the fused relative category is given in [1]: [1] SIMPLE SERIES ...
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1answer
4k views

What does “wandering about” mean?

In a TV show I am watching, I just came across a strange expression : [...] you're just wandering about. I don't understand at all. What is the about for?
2
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1answer
91 views

Parse “asking for books back”

Harry picked it up and stared at it, his heart twanging like a giant elastic band. No one, ever, in his whole life, had written to him. Who would? He had no friends, no other relatives - he didn't ...