Questions tagged [late-modern-english]

For questions about English from the Late Modern English period (1700-1900).

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
31 views

meanng of “so to”

The following is from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Do you know what the "so to" means? It seems to mean "so as to" or "in order to." But I am not even sure if it is a ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

behind or ahead?

The following is an extract from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. I'm wondering whether the word "behind" is equal to "ahead" in 21st-century English in this context. Justine died; ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

detail or detailing

In the following extract from Frankenstein, which of the two possibilities do you think makes more sense? and although I loved him with a mixture of affection and reverence that knew no bounds, yet I ...
1
vote
2answers
74 views

yet with how many things are we upon the brink of becoming acquainted

The following is from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. I'm wondering whether the boldfaced part is likely to have been "would we be": Whence, I often asked myself, did the principle of life ...
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

returned to my old habits

The following is an extract from Frankenstein. What does the "habits" in "returned to my old habits" mean? It does not seem to refer to habits like drinking, staying up late, etc. ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Greece had not been enslaved

The following is an extract from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Is the "had not been" correct? Should it have been "would not have been"? "A human being in perfection ought ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Meaning of an expression from 'Spider-Man(2002)' movie?

In 3:25 an expression of 'Spider-Man(2002) -"But let me assure you,this,like any story worth telling is all about a girl." Can anyone interpret this expression please? Thanks in Advance.
0
votes
2answers
44 views

become as well acquainted . . . as depended on

The following is an extract from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. I'd like to know whether the use of "as well . . . as" is natural in current English and what it means here. When I had ...
0
votes
3answers
44 views

Does “were carried” have a passive structure, or is “carried” simply an adjective in this text?

At Hit the rolling Assyrian plain had come to an end, and the invading army had entered upon the low alluvium of Babylonia, a region of great fertility, intersected by numerous canals, which in some ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

The meaning of “but knew it”

The full phrase is: There was not one in all that assemblage but knew it. This is from a book first published in 1906 My instinct is that it means “everyone in the assemblage knew”.