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Questions tagged [licensing]

Use this tag for questions about what sort of arguments a particular word 'licenses'-- that is, what forms of subject, objects and other complements it requires or permits.

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1answer
405 views

“One‘s wish is to do something” vs “One's wish is doing something”?

I can't see any difference between “His wish is to be a fighter jet pilot” and “His wish is being a fighter jet pilot”.
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2answers
497 views

Why can't we say “explain me it” or “say me it”?

By putting the direct object before the indirect object we can say: tell it to me say it to me explain it to me And if we put the indirect object before the direct object we can say: ...
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1answer
849 views

“be forbidden to Verb” or “be forbidden from Verb_ing”

1.Long ago, women were forbidden to vote in political elections. 2.Long ago, women were forbidden from voting in political elections. Which's true? "be forbidden to V" or "be forbidden from ...
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2answers
599 views

“sue for + verb” or “sue + to + verb”?

… who with Mississippi's attorney general Mike Moore are suing Big Tobacco to reimburse the state for Medicaid funds used to treat people with smoking-related illnesses. (Source) We always say: s/he ...
1
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1answer
675 views

Should “other than” be followed by the infinitive or the -ing form

I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than killing people. I'd do anything for you to repay my debt, other than kill people. Are both sentences grammatically correct? Is the first more ...
10
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1answer
1k views

Is there any reason why we can't use “I hope you to buy me a doll.”

I saw the sentence like I want you to buy me a doll. But I read the book that says I hope you to buy me a doll. is not the right sentence. I think there is a reason certainly.Don't say that ...
0
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1answer
890 views

Subject of infinitive clause with “expected”

You are expected to be well informed. Is it possible to rewrite the above sentence in this way: It is expected from you to be well informed.
0
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1answer
420 views

Is “coincident” followed with “as” or “with”?

I was looking at examples of the word usage of "coincident", and I saw that most "coincidents" were followed by "with". dictionary.com then says that coincident is "happening at the same time", so ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Difference between 'record for' and 'record in'

In an english exercise, there was the correct answer: I am going to establish a new record for swimming. However, my gut wants to write 'record in swimming' (as it is written in Wikipedia: 'list ...
1
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1answer
838 views

When should I use a gerund and when an infinitive with 'like' or 'love'?

Do you like to cook? Do you like cooking? Do you love cooking? Do you love to cook? In which one we should use gerund?
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2answers
78k views

“I like listening to music” and “I like to listen to music” - is there any difference?

When speaking about my hobby, should I say: I like listening to music. I like to listen to music. Do both mean the same? Is any of these sentences grammatically incorrect?
5
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1answer
697 views

What's the difference between “continues doing” and “continues to do”?

I realized I don't really know. I've just been using them interchangeably. If I were to guess, perhaps "continues doing" hints a bit more at a continuous process (continues hitting him for ten ...
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1answer
279 views

Fall/Come Under Investigation

I have a question about "come under" and "fall under". These: He came under suspicion for fraud. He fell under suspicion for fraud. are standard English. Could I then write ...
2
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1answer
217 views

Is it predicative or object clause?

Could you tell me what type of subordinate clause it is: predicative or object? I felt (or had a feeling) that they had no objections. I know that if we have such construction: "I felt as if they ...
11
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1answer
760 views

Bare infinitive vs to-infinitive

I found these sentences in my book: He did nothing but cry. He had no choice but to obey. Example #1 uses a bare infinitive ("cry"), but example #2 uses a to-infinitive ("to obey"). Why ...
2
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4answers
610 views

Perfect Infinitive: To + have

She denied to have seen him yesterday. She denied seeing him yesterday. She denied having seen him yesterday. Are these sentences grammatically correct? Do they mean the same?
1
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1answer
2k views

Except + gerund or infitive

1 The graduate student had nothing in mind except finishing his thesis. 2 The mason will not do any work except giving the order. Both sentences use -ing of verb finish and give. I know these ...
1
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1answer
120 views

Usage of “As Spotted By”

If I take a look at the usage of the verb "notice": As noticed by some customers, the store does not stock the ... Some customers noticed that the store does not stock the... I will ...
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1answer
1k views

… finished {written/writing/to write/wrote} two compositions

I am just practising some english grammar related questions , here is the question I am confused about : Salman finished__________ two of his published compositions before his twelfth birthday. ...
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4answers
4k views

Usage of “ratio to” when talking about proportions

In my application, the fonts are automatically resized to stay proportional with the window. I am trying to describe it with this sentence: Font sizes are dynamically calculated in order to ...
1
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2answers
336 views

Go Into Stalemate

Some usage of "go into" allows this sentence: The company went into bankruptcy. Could "go into", then, be used like this: The two teams went into stalemate. where the context is sports? ...
5
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2answers
3k views

'Would' vs 'should', expressing expectation on the part of the speaker

Page 111 (77, Should expressing probability), Oxford Learner's Grammar - Grammar Finder: We can also use should to say that something is probable, either in the present or the future. ...
2
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1answer
67 views

What is this variant of remember doing?

I remember to have heard that your mother has many suitors Source "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember to have heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill ...
3
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1answer
37k views

Departure To/For

Two senses of both "depart" and "departure" are 1) going from one place to another, and 2) leaving one job and taking another job. For sense 1, it seems that "depart/departure" should be followed ...
2
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1answer
249 views

“Of His Own” Usage

For these idioms: "take a chance" "kick the bucket" "of his own" could be add to first sentence, but not the second: He took a chance of his own. He kicked the bucket of his own. I ...
2
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3answers
79 views

Usages of “Important”

I have a question about "important". When we say <something> is important, that "<something>" is assumed to be positive/desirable. But when we way something is NOT important, then that ...
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4answers
18k views

“I have ever been to New York. ”Is this sentence correct?

I'm not a native english speaker. I know this sentence is correct. Have you ever been to New York? (O) I have never been to New York. (O) I have ever been to New York. <<<< ??? Is this ...
1
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1answer
121 views

look forward to meeting

“My daughter and I––and my dog, Enzo––would very much like to join you for dinner in Maranello, then.” “Your dog is named Enzo? How propitious!” “He is a race car driver at heart,” Denny ...
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1answer
59 views

complements of 'typical of'

"It's typical of men to annex a global trend and turn it into a male device to reject women to make themselves feel clever and us feel stupid." (Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones's Diary) It seems ...
2
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2answers
631 views

“I end up studying English” vs. “I end up to study English”

Why is it that we have to use the gerund form for the first example? I have been told that it is not grammatical to use the infinitive form. For some verbs, it's okay: I wanted to study English. ...
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3answers
881 views

I don't understand this structure of the sentence

As committed as he is to improving the quality of education in urban school, I don't understand why the word used is improving, not improve (root verb)
9
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2answers
4k views

Interpretation of “My dream is becoming an English teacher.”

My dream is becoming an English teacher. Do native speakers not think that the person who says that wants to become an English teacher? And, by any chance, do native speakers think that he/she went ...
3
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2answers
5k views

How to say “I suggest adding [something]”

I said to my employee: I suggest adding dtUpdate column to the table. For me it sounds wrong. I want to say: I suggest to add dtUpdate column to the table. But I know by verb pattern this is ...
2
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2answers
12k views

How to parse this sentence: “The book is worth reading”?

The book is worth reading. How to parse the sentence constituents? How to parse "worth doing"? What kind of constituent it is?
1
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1answer
107 views

Does 'reason' have a modifier and a complement?

Things couldn't have been worse. Filch took them down to Professor McGonagall's study on the first floor, where they sat and waited without saying a word to each other. Hermione was trembling....
7
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2answers
4k views

Verb + object + verb

Which one of this two sentences is correct? I need you to help me do this job I need you to help me to do this job Can you also provide me some explanation?
2
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1answer
1k views

“ … need [something] 'verb-ing' … ” vs. “ … need [something] 'infinitive' … ”

Like most backup programs, you need another drive to store the File History archive. You can use an external USB drive or a network location, and Microsoft has instructions for setting up either ...
7
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1answer
2k views

Infinitive and Gerund Construction

English isn't my mother tongue. I'm familiar with the notions of infinitive and gerund but I sometimes just don't know which of the two should be used in combination with which verb. Thomson and ...
21
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3answers
30k views

“He likes swimming” or “He likes to swim”?

One can say: He likes swimming or He likes to swim. What is the exact meaning of each of these? What is the difference?
7
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3answers
4k views

Why is “He said me he was …” ungrammatical, but “He told me he was …” is not?

a.1) He said he was moving to New York. a.2) *He said me he was moving to New York. b.1) *He told he was moving to New York. b.2) He told me he was moving to New York. Why is a.2) ...
9
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2answers
1k views

“Make” meaning “force to do something”

As it is well known, among other meanings "make" means force someone to do something and searching on Google shows that the sentence "The boss made me work an extra day" is grammatical (68,500 hits). ...