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Questions tagged [linking-verbs]

"Linking verbs" (also called "copulas") are verbs which link a subject to a predicate complement which describes or identifies it. 'Be' is the principle linking verb; some more are 'become', 'remain', 'seem'.

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Can the verb "be' be a dynamic verb?

I have read from many sources that 'be,' 'seem,' and 'become,' are always linking verbs. But I have seen a few sources mentioning 'be' as occasionally a dynamic verb as well. If 'be' is always a ...
A_Mendes's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
62 views

"Giant diamond teardrops and swooping strings of chandelier glass hang imperious and heavy over the tables."

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe) William takes in the ballroom's high ceiling, the pink and white embellishments, looping and twisting in and out of the alcoves. Giant diamond teardrops ...
philphil's user avatar
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The omission of the copula is

I was on a plane and saw this, but I was not sure if another “is” is needed before the adjective punishable. “Unauthorised removal of life vest is a criminal offense and punishable by law”
Angyang's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
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Is "it is looking good" slang?

I heard American people often say this. Say, a person is drawing a picture. When he is halfway to finishing it, he says "it's looking good". I was taught at school that many linking verbs (...
Tom's user avatar
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3 answers
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Can a linking verb be followed by an adverb?

I read a line in a grammar book "at least the play reads well" in this sentence, the verb "reads" is a linking verb, so shouldn't the right word to use be "good" instead ...
Akshit Raj's user avatar
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2 answers
233 views

That is I vs That is me

I understand that after a linking verb, the noun should be in subject case. So why do we say "that is me" instead of "that is I" ? Is the former grammatically accurate?
Akshit Raj's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
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There are one "looks" and one "runs" without "and" in the position of verbs. Is this correct?

I see a sentence in the The Economist 202307015: Each chart in British public policy looks roughly the same, runs a joke among the country’s wonk-class. looks is a linking verb and runs is a verb. ...
Y. zeng's user avatar
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"prove to be painful" vs "prove painful", any difference?

What should I put here, "The learning process proved to be painful or just The learning process proved painful" ? Is there any difference ? BTW, the question is to fill in the blank with ...
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
82 views

Why is "emerged" in "She emerged from the divorce a stronger person" marked only as intransitive but not as linking?

All dictionaries which mark their verbs with the labels: "transitive", "intransitive" and "linking", for some reason, don't write that the verb "emerge" has a ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 answers
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Let me (be) free/loose

Proceeding from the internet, I inferred the following thing: (1) Let me free. — idiomatic (2) Let me be free. — idiomatic (3) Let me loose. — idiomatic (4) Let me be loose. — unidiomatic That is, &...
Loviii's user avatar
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Can a subject and its complement be of different numbers?

Can a subject and a subject complement be of different numbers, i.e. one of them is plural and the other is singular? To check this, I came up with some examples (where, as I understand, "are&...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
126 views

Can the verb "end up" be used as a linking verb?

Can the verb "end up" be a linking verb? E.g. "he ended up homeless"
Petro Probka's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
41 views

than (it) seems/appears

(1a) These boxes contain more toys than it seems possible. — as far as I know, it's correct (1b) These boxes contain more toys than seems possible. — is it correct? (2a) These boxes contain more toys ...
Loviii's user avatar
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Role of like in copular/linking verbs

I'm struggling to make some distinctions regarding copular, or linking, verbs. She sounds like a lawyer. She has become like her mother. She looks like a princess. #1: Is "sounds" an ...
Educator22's user avatar
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1 answer
100 views

“The meeting is canceled.“ “Who told you that?“

“The meeting is canceled.“ “Who told you that?“ “The meeting was canceled.“ “Who told you that?“ What's the exact meaning of "The meeting is canceled."? As a non-native English speaker, I ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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1 answer
23 views

linking verbal clauses with conjunctions

Why is the case that the below sentence has three verbs that weren't linked with any conjunction? Also, why use the comma prior to the last clause. I don't know exactly why this sentence is structured ...
MBR's user avatar
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2 answers
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Why does the writer use 'is' twice in a row here?

Why does the writer use 'is' twice in a row here? Either the issuer's place of business where the undertaking is issued is located in a country that has adopted the Convention, or under international ...
user152973's user avatar
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2 answers
49 views

"To Be" conjugation with Inversions?

Looking at the TV was/were John and Jane. Should "to be" be conjugated in the singular or plural form? My first thought was that it should agree with Looking at the TV; after all it comes ...
lil' barbussy's user avatar
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1 answer
50 views

Combining clauses with different linking verbs by conjunction and leaving out the subject

A TOEFL book claims that I'm not allowed to write like this, for example the conjunction "and" : I still have leftovers on the table and am cooking it later. Why is it incorrect? Does that ...
user516076's user avatar
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"The angry man" vs "The man is angry"

It seems like existential linking verbs behave like determiners, in that they reference a noun, so I'm curious if there is any actual difference between these 'types' of references. For example is ...
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2 answers
52 views

Can we split the (will + linking verb) in a passive form and put an adverb between them?

I was writing this on my Facebook post: ... it will certainly be accepted A friend of mine corrected me it should have been written like this: ... it certainly will be accepted However, I don't ...
user516076's user avatar
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Is the past participle a linking verb in these examples of passive constructions?

A man called Jack opened the door. The man was called Jack. In these two examples, 'called' is a past-participle, and the proper noun 'Jack' is a subject complement that renames the noun 'man'. This ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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1 answer
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Does including 'to be' after linking verbs sounds informal?

Here I provide the excerpt I took from Advanced Grammar In Use: Before a noun we include to be when the noun tells us what the subject is, but often leave it out when we give our opinion of the ...
user516076's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
75 views

When is 'to be' an auxillary or linking verb?

He was broken. He was broken by the news. In the first example, is 'was' a linking verb or an auxiliary verb? The second example shows that adding a prepositional phrase ('by the news') evidences ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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0 answers
29 views

Would "is" be considered a linking or transitive verb in this situation?

Suppose I had the following sentence: The apple is on the tree. "On the tree" is a prepositional phrase. Therefore, the verb is cannot be linking anything back to the subject (apple). ...
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1 answer
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SVC sentence structure confusion [closed]

I have read about SVC sentences like "we all feel sorry for him". Can I also write: The trunk wrinkled old and dry. As wrinkle is not a linking verb so is it incorrect? Is there any other ...
Learner's user avatar
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They seemed a nice couple [duplicate]

They seemed a nice couple. They seemed to be a nice couple. They seemed like a nice couple. Are they all correct?
Mr. X's user avatar
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"I cannot account for my (be) so talkative. It's just my character"

I cannot account for my (be) so talkative. It's just my character. What form of verb "be" should be used in this sentence? I can't come up with anything.
Magda's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
365 views

Is "To be" a linking or auxiliary verb?

I have been wondering about this question for a long time but I was hesitant to ask as it seemed a very small one. But I must ask it now: Is the verb To be linking verb or auxiliary verb(helping verb)...
Guri's user avatar
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word order don't correspond the meaning of a sentence

I can't seem to get started today If we read from the left to the right then we consecutively get following equals: I can't (to do smth) where "to do smth" is "seem to get started ...
xyz's user avatar
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1 answer
81 views

How to convert "my only options are..." to a question?

Suppose we have a sentence like this: My only options are to either do X or do Y. How do I convert this to a question? If I follow the "standard rule", the question becomes: Are my only ...
ICloneable's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
54 views

What the usage and role of "to be" in below sentence?

What the usage and grammatical role of "to be" in below sentence? It rained this morning but it has turned out to be a lovely day. What's the difference between the above sentence and ...
Mojtaba Reyhani's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

felt still more gloomily

The following extract is from Frankenstein. Does anyone know why the adverb gloomily is used after the linking verb felt? Yet, as I drew nearer home, grief and fear again overcame me. Night also ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
408 views

Why do we use "be" with "will", instead of "is" and "are"?

I want to know from a grammatical point of view why do we use be with will instead of using is and are. For example: Jack will be skydiving tomorrow. Correct Jack will is skydiving tomorrow. ...
Hammad's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
224 views

Is "there" a subject?

A clause usually has a subject and a verb. For example, in this sentence, "Joe loves baseball". "Joe" is the subject, "loves" is the verb. How about "there is"? There's someone on the phone ...
Piete3r's user avatar
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2 answers
43 views

why do we use "of" here, this structure can be repeat after other verbs, but "to be"?

In some sentence, we see that the "of" is used, do you think the use of it is need? for example: 1- It is of the utmost/highest importance, 2- those built were of interest, 3- cooperation ...
lee's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
215 views

What clause elements are in "That doesn't sound like him."?

I've been struggling to analyse this sentence in terms of its clause elements. That doesn't sound like him. What I mean by the clause elements are the following: verb, subject, object, subject ...
Domi's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
191 views

Which linking verb to use with countable and uncountable nouns

Here is my example: "Cloud phone solutions work over the internet, so the only on-site hardware you would ever need (is/are) the phones." Hardware is uncountable, but phones is countable. Is the ...
Michael Frearson's user avatar
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0 answers
206 views

Linking verb followed by a verb

According to The British Council description, links-verbs are followed by either a noun or an adjective. In the following sentence, "smiling" is a verb, and as I see it, "is" acts as a linking verb. ...
SunnySideDown's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
142 views

After linking verb whether adjectives or adverbs

I know after linking verb, Adjectives should be used, not adverbs. For example I'am fine (not well, as WELL is an adverb). But how you explain the following sentences , I'm abroad. I'm home. I'm ...
Mohammad Abul Hasem's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
62 views

Different Usage of adjectives

Sometimes I come across sentences where adjectives is used and act like adverbs (?) . Usually they are placed at the end of the sentences. I understand them perfectly but grammatical structure seems ...
Talha Özden's user avatar
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2 answers
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linking verbs followed by noun or noun phrase?

At my school I have learned - linking verbs are followed by adjectives but the following sentences confuse me. He is a good teacher. He became headmaster. She is a nurse. In the above ...
Arif Talukdar's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
409 views

Adjective preposition phrase vs adverb preposition phrase

I'm good Chicago is on the northest tip of Illinois. I'm confuse, in first sentence, "Good" as an adjective, modify subject "I", or linking verb 'IS". If "Good" modify subject "I", then what the ...
Mohammad Abul Hasem's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
539 views

Is asleep in "to fall asleep" an adverb?

DK school dictionary says "asleep" in to fall asleep is an adverb. Yet, according to https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/asleep "Asleep" in to fall asleep is an ...
JYJ's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
183 views

"Often" as complement of BE

Often is an adverb according to Oxford Dictionaries Online. ADVERB 1 Frequently; many times. 'he often goes for long walks by himself' 'how often do you have your hair cut?' 1.1 ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
85 views

"She smells...." -> just who's sniffing at the moment?

Linda smells bad! Patricia smells the flower. When you say the first sentence, the one who sniffs the scent would be the others than Linda herself. On the other hand, on second phrase, the one ...
dolco's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
120 views

When and How to use Linking verb (Is/Was/Were) In the sentence?

Which one of the below sentence is correct? Is there any rule to include linking verb? a) Three person were killed when boat capsized due to overload. b) Three person killed when boat was capsized ...
user4084's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Can "get" be used as a linking verb in a context of a gradual change?

Can "get" be used as a linking verb in a context of a gradual change? For instance, instead of saying: She came/grew to like him more. Can I say: She got to like him more.
F0rg1v3n's user avatar
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1 answer
48 views

Being and Was, Which one is correct and why?

Can you please tell me which sentence is correct here? What if I just take out the preposition "with", is it still grammatically correct? Less coal was burned in 1980, with its figure being just ...
Tinh Le's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
844 views

Seem (to be) past participle

Please kindly read the sentence: ‘[Some court decisions] seem best explained as based on considerations of the well-known policy of preventing the Statute being used itself as an instrument of ...
Rashid's user avatar
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