Questions tagged [loan-words]

This tag is for questions about words borrowed by English from other languages.

0
votes
1answer
104 views

Is sombrero an english word?

A coworker told me that the word "sombrero" is an English word borrowed from Mexico. I had the idea is a foreign word. Is that right?
22
votes
3answers
5k views

Is there any difference in pronunciation between the words “fiancé (a male)” and “fiancée (a female)”?

I see no difference between transcriptions above-mentioned words, and what words / variants would be better to use in those meanings? fiancé /fɪˈɑːnseɪ/ /fɪˈɒnseɪ/ /fɪˈɒ̃seɪ/ - ODO fiancée /fɪˈɒnseɪ/ ...
2
votes
2answers
264 views

blonde or blond

https://www.lingq.com/learn/en/preview/item/431401/ I was on my bike, and I saw the thief as I cycled past. It was quite dark, but I could tell he was old, at least 35, with blonde hair. He was ...
4
votes
1answer
388 views

What does the phrase 'the absolute finito' mean here?

When I read the book Breakfast at Tiffany's, I encounter a sentence in the following context: Oh, he’s not my idea of the absolute finito. He tells little lies and he worries what people think ...
0
votes
2answers
699 views

Russian loan words in English [closed]

I have a task to make a research paper about Russian loan-words in English and can't find any informative material. Could you help me, please? I spent hours googling and got almost nothing. Is this ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Has the word “phenomena” become a singular noun: even on mainstream media it is often used as if it is

This text was written by coffee1054 in this question: The phenomena of superconductivity was discovered in 1911. Is the sentence above acceptable, or should it be changed to "phenomenon"? I ...
3
votes
3answers
364 views

Plural for words borrowed directly from Russian

In Russian most plurals are formed by adding the “-i” sound to the end of the word. Since English has a tradition of borrowing the plural forms from other languages, I wonder whether it can be used ...
3
votes
1answer
282 views

Pronunciation of mathematical terms “Mahlo cardinal” and “mahloness” by native English speakers

There are terms Mahlo cardinal and mahloness used in set theory (a branch of mathematics). These terms originated from the name of Friedrich Paul Mahlo, a German mathematician. I've only ever seen ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Are terms of endearment such as “honey” or “darling” seen as old-fashioned or archaic?

Often times when we're overwhelmingly beclouded with love and want to put up a petting habit, these words would be a way to show it. Honey, Darling, Sweetie, Mine, Sweetheart, etc I was ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “Nanjing” as likely to be understood as “Nanking”?

When describing the city in China, is the spelling "Nanjing" as likely to be understood by the general population of native English speakers as "Nanking" is? An examination of Google NGrams indicates ...
8
votes
4answers
375 views

Can “bento” be used without “box”?

Is "bento" by itself likely to be understood by native speakers of English, and feel natural, without the word "box" afterwards? For example, can you say "This is a photo of a bento I ate yesterday"? ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “First bite” genuine English, or wasei-eigo?

At a wedding a friend of mine attended in Japan, she saw the bride and groom feed each other a slice of cake. He was told by the MC that it was "first bite" (ファーストバイト), a commitment the bride and ...
19
votes
5answers
14k views

Is rendezvous pronounced like run-they-who?

I know that pronunciation in English is not very consistent, but I heard rendezvous being pronounced like run-they-who, which felt very strange. Is this really the right way to pronounce it, and how ...