Questions tagged [locative]

Grammatical case dealing with location.

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How to describe a position in English?

As I know, if there are two things distributed in front of me like below, I can say there two items going "left to right". If I want to specify a particular one, "the right one" or ...
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"NP is there to-infinitive" vs "there is NP to-infinitive"

ldoceonline.com: (1a) Your adviser’s experience is there to be tapped. — "NP is there to-infinitive" is odd to me in this sentence. my variant: (1b) There is your adviser’s experience to be ...
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Is it necessary to add hyphens before this location?

I am wondering whether I need to add hyphens to Karala in this context? Is it necessary? Moreover, this specific education allows her to aid like no other to her home region --Karala, whose population ...
pepo's user avatar
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Location Description

When I described the location of the shop, I preferred to use "upper side" phrase, but one of my friends advised me to use compass information. My Sentence: The shop is located in upper side of of ...
Goktug's user avatar
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location - returned from where?

Consider the following sentences. If John had come from Boston, was it the place Peter arrived at, or the place Peter came from? Peter returned from where John had come. Peter returned whence ...
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What is the difference between 'There is a pencil there.' and 'There is a pencil.'?

I want to know the difference between the two sentences above. There is a pencil there. There is a pencil. I think that 'there' is unnecessary in No.1 sentence. Would you please tell me the ...
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"Look at" vs "Look over"

I keep seeing "Look at" and "Look over" being used, but I don't quite understand the difference between them. The boy looked over her. The boy looked at her.
Blue's user avatar
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When giving directions, which of these examples are acceptable?

Which one of these sentences is the most natural way to say this? You have to walk 200 feet up on Elm Street. You have to walk up 200 feet on Elm Street. You have to walk up for 200 feet ...
user34244's user avatar
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Can I row this boat to the water's edge?

Can a person in a rowboat, while he is in the middle of a lake, say "I am now going to row the boat to the water's edge"? I can imagine a man in a boat, in the middle of a lake, looking towards the ...
TimR's user avatar
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Is the use of the phrase "at New York" correct?

If someone says that he lives at New York, looking at the map, is the use of the phrase "at New York" correct?
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Using "in that" instead of "in which" [duplicate]

In this sentence: The diet could be prescribed for someone with any disease in which there is an abnormal retention of fluid. Is it correct to replace "in which" with "in that"? Where we could do ...
user115688's user avatar
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Can Intransitive verbs such as "arrive" take objects?

I am learning English grammar. I am not a beginner and I am following an English grammar book to improve my grammar. The book gives some examples of intransitive verbs (verbs that don't take any ...
Waheed Khan's user avatar
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1 answer
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I am wondering what "back" means here?

A. He backs. B. He is back. C. he will be back What is the difference in meaning between these?
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"Deep in the forest a call was sounding", existential construction?

“Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to ...
saySay's user avatar
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In "Give it here!", is "here" a pronoun, adverb, preposition, or what?

In the American regionalism, "Give it here!" (i.e. Pass that thing my way -> in my direction -> Give it to me) Questions: What part of speech is the word "here"? That is, is it a pronoun, adverb,...
TimR's user avatar
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Can an adverb follow "to be"?

Consider these examples: They are everywhere. There is food everywhere. I used sentences like these a lot but lately I realize that everywhere is an adverb. What about those grammar rules that ...
user2747502's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
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Transitive verbs VS intransitive verbs

As per my knowledge: A transitive verb takes a direct object. Some examples: I watched a movie. He played cricket. An intransitive verb does not take a direct object. Some examples: ...
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What does this use of 'there' mean?

[Ron] "Look –– they're off Ouch!" Someone had poked Ron in the back of the head. It was Malfoy. "Oh, sorry, Weasley, didn't see you there." (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) They say ...
Listenever's user avatar
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What is the role of 'level with' in this sentence?

"Give that here, Malfoy," said Harry quietly. Everyone stopped talking to watch. Malfoy smiled nastily. "I think I'll leave it somewhere for Longbottom to find - how about - up a tree?" "Give ...
Listenever's user avatar
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Parse "asking for books back"

Harry picked it up and stared at it, his heart twanging like a giant elastic band. No one, ever, in his whole life, had written to him. Who would? He had no friends, no other relatives - he didn't ...
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