Questions tagged [meaning]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about what a word means. If the question is about the meaning of a word that can't be understood outside its phrase or sentence, the "meaning-in-context" tag should be also used; for the meaning of a phrase, use the "phrase-meaning" tag instead.

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5
votes
1answer
189 views

Could there be any difference between “all in one” and “in one”?

I found these two expressions here Oxford Dictionary and I don't know why one is used and not the other one. 1 - She's a mother and company director in one. 2 - It's a public relations office,...
10
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4answers
4k views

Meaning of “boilerplate”

I came across the term boilerplate somewhere in a documentation (can't find the link/page right now). On coming back to my room and opening up my dictionary, I saw the following definitions: Noun: ...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

What does a “carton” here looks like?

I was looking for the definition of a six-pack and Google definition states it is: a carton containing six bottles or cans. From OALD, I noticed that a carton can have several kinds: a light ...
5
votes
1answer
478 views

Isn't this contradictory?

Mr. Gilmer asked him one more question. “About you writing with you left hand, are you ambidextrous, Mr. Ewell?” “I most positively am not, I can use one hand good as the other. One hand good as ...
6
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2answers
1k views

What does 'fit everything around someone' mean?

Paul wonders aloud why they must always fit everything around Matt. (thearchers.co.uk) What does the highlighted part mean?
15
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3answers
7k views

Word meaning: “arguably”

I am wondering about the meaning of word "arguably". I have of course read its definitions in dictionaries but they seem to differ. As I am from Poland, I checked English->Polish dictionaries in the ...
1
vote
1answer
154 views

What’s the meaning of ‘ever’ accompanying with perfect tense?

We move our chairs forward. This was the nearest I had ever been to her, and the thing I wanted most to do was move my chairs back again. (Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird) What’s the meaning of ‘...
2
votes
1answer
252 views

Why is “robes” used in this sentence?

The oldest boy came striding into sight. He had already changed into his billowing black Hogwarts robes, and Harry noticed a shiny silver badge on his chest with the letter P on it. (Harry Potter ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

what is the difference between kind, type and sort

I see these sentences: Newton invented a new type of microscope. Newton invented a new kind of mathematics. Apple invented a new sort of cameras. What is the difference between kind, sort, and ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Is the sentence “I am already working on this project and it is almost code complete.” grammatically correct?

I am already working on this project and it is almost code complete. Is this a correct use of "code complete"? I know that it is a book but I am not sure if this is the right way to say it as a non-...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

“Dead and gone” vs “Dead and buried”

Is there any difference between these two expressions when we are talking about a person? It seems that they have the same meaning. According to The Free Dictionary "dead and gone" means "long dead" ...
7
votes
1answer
7k views

Does “ to put something in mothballs” mean the same as “to mothball something”?

If we take a look at the idiom "in mothballs" the meaning is "stored and not in use, often for a long time" and the meaning of "to mothball" is "to decide not to use or develop something, for a period ...
3
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2answers
6k views

express delivery service (overnight)

$18 for Express Delivery Service(overnight) Does the overnight here mean they will delivery the package on next business day? or It means the package will be delivered at night?
5
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4answers
7k views

What does “eventually” mean in this sentence?

Looking at a Wikipedia article describing a telefilm, I noted the following sentence that describes an event happened in Season 1: They eventually find and reunite with their father, who reveals ...
6
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3answers
2k views

“Wear mourning” vs “Go into mourning”

Are these expressions the same? As far as I can understand some texts I've been reading with these expressions, it seems that they have the same meaning.
7
votes
1answer
560 views

What does “between drink and dignity” mean?

I'm reading one book now (Black Arrow, by Robert Louis Stevenson), and I found one sentence (or, rather, part of a sentence) I can't understand. “What!” bawled one of the grumblers, “he carrieth ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Does the noun “stable” have meanings other than “place for animals”?

I came across a Japanese person noting that an English term for the Japanese word "heya" (部屋), the training area of Sumo wrestlers, is "sumo stable", and that "stable" is usually a word used for ...
2
votes
2answers
522 views

“evaluator” vs “valuator” vs “rater”

I'm looking for an English verb that describes an entity which gives a score/rating to something (a quality measure, for example). Would that be "evaluator", "valuator", "rater", or even something ...
13
votes
2answers
137k views

Differences between 'till now', 'as of now','yet', 'up till now'

I have seen phrases like the following: Till now Yet Up till now As of now Is there any difference between their usage and meaning, or do they have the same meaning?
6
votes
1answer
143 views

What is the difference between “quote” and “estimate”?

What is the difference betwen the words quote and estimate? Is the difference the same in British English and American English?
1
vote
1answer
344 views

Does “made his point to” in this sentence mean “made his way to”?

Example: Our fox made his point to Moorhill.
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Why is this sentence using “cognizance” instead of “awareness”?

I understand the meaning of cognizance is "knowledge, awareness or notice." However, for a given situation why should I use cognizance instead of knowledge or awareness or notice? Take the below ...
6
votes
3answers
19k views

“Make a point to” or “make a point of”?

Is there any difference between using these expressions? She made a point of taking a vacation in Italy. She made a point to take a vacation in Italy.
5
votes
3answers
25k views

What does “never mind” really mean?

What does "never mind" really mean? I am trying to find out the answer for it. I have been hearing that for years, but I don't use it myself because I do NOT know the true meaning.
8
votes
4answers
15k views

“It is with extremely mixed emotions..”

Whenever somebody resigns, or does something out of the ordinary, the president at our institution always sends out an email that begins It is with extremely mixed emotions that I announce the ...
4
votes
3answers
406 views

Comparing “atom bomb” & “atomic bomb” with “atom explosion” & “atomic explosion”

Merriam Webster says that "atom" is a noun, not an adjective, albeit there is the entry "atom bomb" in which, I think, "atom" is used as an adjective. Google Books has a lot of hits for "atom ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

Appointment vs. meeting (vs. date)

What is the difference in meaning between these words? I would use date if I were single, I like a woman, and I want to spend some time with her; let's say that this word is different from the other ...
4
votes
1answer
162 views

Did the author forget to use 'if' or I'm missing some literary style [closed]

I completed reading a short novel "A Little Princess" written by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The servant, "Ram Dass" says the following while planning to change the protagonist's(Sara Crewe) room from ...
3
votes
1answer
37k views

What does “stark contrast” mean? [closed]

I was reading The Accidental Billionaires and I came across this sentence "...; the relaxed, almost rubbery way he leaned against the window - a stark contrast to his usual calcified, if slightly ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Meaning of progressive: “were seeing” vs “saw”

(1) We still saw each other a couple of times a month. (MacMillandictionary.com) * I changed the verb 'saw' from 'see' (2) They were seeing so much of each other, he was almost one of the ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

nothing a good beating wouldn't have cured [closed]

"I accept there's something strange about you, probably nothing a good beating wouldn't have cured - and as for all this about your parents, well, they were weirdos, no denying it, and the world's ...
4
votes
2answers
866 views

Is the meaning of “travel company”, “travel firm” and “travel agency” the same?

I wonder whether the meaning of "travel company", "travel firm" and "travel agency" is the same. Can we use them interchangeably to vary the language in a paragraph?
6
votes
1answer
930 views

Intimidate - Always to threaten and fill with fear?

I work in the IT field (software development). Whenever we get some task to do I hear my supervisors saying, I will intimidate him regarding this (to do some task). When I searched I found that ...
19
votes
2answers
30k views

What does “80-odd” mean?

http://underscorejs.org/ has a paragraph: Underscore [library] provides 80-odd functions that support both the usual functional suspects: map, select, invoke... What does '80-odd' stand for? ...
13
votes
3answers
141 views

How does 'all' work in “Are these two agreements all right?”

The title of an earlier question is: Are these two agreements all right? I'm not sure whether that title means (1) or (2) below. "Are both these two agreements right?" "Are these two agreements ...
4
votes
1answer
211 views

Replacing “adverse” with “averse” and “not adverse” with “not averse”

1.A. They said they were not adverse to examining proposals for modifying the lobbying law, though they [...]. 1.B. They said they were not averse to examining proposals for modifying the ...
5
votes
1answer
11k views

Differences between “has started taking”, “has been taking”, “has taken” and “took”

Can anybody explain the meaning of these sentences? He has started taking antidepressants. He has been taking antidepressants. He has taken antidepressants. He took antidepressants.
6
votes
1answer
85 views

Is 'causal' strictly needed in “… the most important 'causal' agents …”

1-. Salmonella is considered one of the most important causal agents of food-borne illness in developed countries. (US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health) After having read ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Dispute around the word “snatch” in movie TED

Below is an extract from the movie TED, between sophisticated Lori and trailer trash Tami-Lynn: Lori : Ted's very handsome, so I'm always interested in meeting the lady that can snatch him up. ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

what is the meaning of the two sentences

Flowers are planted in the garden. [planted: past participle, past tense of plant] Flowers are planting in the garden. [planting: present participle of plant] What is the meaning of the above two ...
0
votes
2answers
113 views

Would somebody describe the exact position of this man in this sentence? [closed]

"When they arrived, the body was lying on the sand with its head resting on the seawall, and with its feet crossed and pointing directly to the sea". If his head was resting on the seawall then how ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

“expected never” vs. “never expected”

The ridicule and scorn we expected never happened. The ridicule and scorn we never expected happened. Can anybody explain if 1 and 2 mean the same thing? If not, what are the differences in ...
6
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the meaning of “imbibe the imbibements”?

Though no statistics are available, it is probably safe to asssume that few of them regularly drop their butts and boogie to rock music, and that even fewer imbibe the imbibements which were easing ...
8
votes
2answers
91k views

What does “same same but different” mean?

A friend of mine asked what "same same but different" meant. The context was in an essay called Same-same, but different on the Japan Times website: One Indochinese term we all learned was the ...
4
votes
1answer
684 views

What does 'scape mean in this quote by Shakespeare?

I found this line in Hamlet by William Shakespeare. And 'scape detecting, I will pay the theft. What does "'scape" mean? Google says this. A long, leafless flower stalk coming directly from ...
2
votes
1answer
139 views

Superstitious - How to use with a person's name?

Below mentioned is an excerpts from Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. What is the meaning of the bolded phrase below? I know what superstitious means, but I don't understand how it can be ...
10
votes
7answers
17k views

What does “Don't take my words at face value” mean?

What does "Don't take my words at face value" mean?
5
votes
1answer
7k views

What does “do't” mean?

I found this line in Hamlet by William Shakespeare. I'll do't. Dost thou come here to whine? What does "do't" mean? Google returneth only "don't". Is "do't" an alternative spelling of "don't"? ...
12
votes
4answers
12k views

Froth and foam, which one is preferred?

Tonight, while having a cup of hot-chocolate, me and my friends had a little discussion about the foam/bubbles/froth formed on the top of the drink. While I said that it should be referred to as ...
8
votes
2answers
6k views

“Confused” vs. “bewildered”

Is there any major difference in the meanings of bewildered/bewildering and confused/confusing? How about the context in which they can be used?