Questions tagged [morphology]

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the stem and root of "dying"

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: stem - (grammar) the main part of a word that stays the same when endings are added to it: (1) ‘Writ’ is the stem of the forms ‘writes’, ‘writing’ and ‘written’. Based ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 answer
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Use of two same words repeating immediately

Button, Button is the title of a short story by Richard Mathewson. The title has the same word two times. Is it the use epizeuxis to lay stress like Papa, Papa I want to go to picnic? If not, how will ...
Abid's user avatar
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1 vote
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wake up, awaken and awake

He woke up to find others gone. He awakened to find others gone. He awoke to find others gone. All of the sentences can be found grammatical in OED and they seem identical in meaning. I am ...
user421993's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
92 views

An interesting teacher VS an interested student [duplicate]

We know an adjective ending in either -ing or -ed can modify a noun. What is the difference between these two pairs? An interesting teacher An interested student A heartbroken mother ( A ...
user421993's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
127 views

from here to the hotel vs from the hotel to here

It is two miles from here to the hotel. It is two miles from the hotel to here. The first example is commonly seen with no problem, but the second one seems not right. CGEL says "here" is ...
user421993's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
123 views

Is "a pair of words formed with prefixes that convey the same meaning" ambiguous?

I was asked to choose, between two options, the correct. The question: A pair of words formed with prefixes that convey the same meaning is ( x ) inside/intimate ( ✓ ) impossible/discourage It's ...
testing_22's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
291 views

The word "Unlockable"

Unlockable(unlock-able) usually means something that can be unlocked. Ex: That door is unlockable. However, I noticed that you can say the opposite... Unlockable(un-lockable). Something that can not ...
Skye-AT's user avatar
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1 answer
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Are there compound words whose meanings would be changed once there is a change in stress?

I have one true-or-false question. The different stress used in a compound do not usually affect the meaning of the compound. The example used in my book to illustrate why this statement is false is ...
user112563's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why do some people use 'It's ain't' as in "It's ain't true" with "Is + ain't"?

I found that many people use the form of 'is ain't' on the Internet. I don't know why they use "Is" + "Ain't" whereas it doesn't make any sense? According to Google, there are ...
NIA Team's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Why " other" not " others"

I saw this sentence in the Cambridge Dictionary. We'll find someone or other to help us. Why does this sentence use " other" rather than " others" or " other people" ?
user421993's user avatar
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1 answer
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A mathematics nazi is part of the mathematical inquisition?

I learned that a grammar nazi is someone who seems extremely authoritarian in compulsively correcting people's grammar mistakes and other errors while practicing languages. And today I learned another ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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What's the adjective of the word "use"

If I want to say "popular" about the cars. Cars were more (popular) than now days In the sense that they were used a lot, what's the adjective I should use? Not popular, but... (adjective ...
user avatar
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1 answer
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meaning of "divvy up"

A tutorial coins a word "divvy" "div" is an HTML tag, could simply be considered a section in a document. I guess the morpheme used in the coining word might have some common ...
JQQ's user avatar
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1 answer
204 views

What is 'round in "Gather ’round and listen close"?

In page 11 of this book: Algorithms by DPV a line confused me: Gather ’round and listen close. I thought it means to come close and listen carefully, but I get stuck by the 'round form. Does it ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
2k views

The past tense of eat: eat or ate

It seems that the past tense of eat is both eat and ate. (OED.) I think ate is more prevalent. Is eat used in a certain region? eat ▪ I. eat, v. (iːt) pa. tense ate, eat (eɪt, ɛt, iːt). ...
Toothrot's user avatar
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2 answers
503 views

Why does something "belong to someone" and not "belong someone"?

The confusing language lesson bewildered John. Detective Frey believed the suspect's story. You're trying to befriend someone who doesn't trust you. If the examples above are correct, this one ...
M.A.R.'s user avatar
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1 answer
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Does the morpheme “ative”, used as a suffix, transform the word into adjectives or nouns?

preservative, for instance, can be either used as a noun or an adjective. This kind of food doesn’t contain any kind of preservatives the preservative effect of freezing is good to keep most ...
Bavyan Yaldo's user avatar
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Are the suffixes -al and -ar the same adjective suffixes? if not why? [closed]

This picture is about specific examples of these two suffixes.
Michael's user avatar
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1 answer
225 views

What do native speakers think of when they are speaking? [closed]

I know this question might seem somehow ridiculous to you or silly. You may ask me why don't answer these questions by thinking of what you do in your native language. The thing is that I didn't want ...
An english thinker's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
201 views

rule of adding suffix -ing [duplicate]

Today I went through a link in Oxford stating https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/spelling/verb-tenses-adding-ed-and-ing If the verb has only one syllable and ends with a single vowel plus a ...
Jessi's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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an average of - what is it - a noun or a preposition?

please help me to understand using "an average of" in this sentence: > Husbands help in the house more than they did in the past, but in the UK for example, men do an average of just six hours a ...
Stan Wolfe's user avatar
52 votes
7 answers
13k views

Why are nice picture/gif/video about foo called "foo-porn"?

I was browsing Reddit and I discovered many subreddits named after foo-porn, to name just a few: /r/EarthPorn /r/FoodPorn /r/Map_Porn /r/ruralporn /r/shockwaveporn /r/SkyPorn /r/unixporn It seems ...
nalzok's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Positive, comparative, superlative and... is there a fourth?

I'm wondering whether English has something beyond its superlative degree. In my language we call that "túlzófok", it literally translates to "exaggerative degree." I'm wondering because I often hear ...
Korvin's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is "I bought it because it costed ..." an idiomatic and grammatical phrase?

I thought the phrase was common. Example sentence: Naomi bought the coffee because it costed ¥499, and she was obsessed with prime numbers. However, Google only yields 4 results. This makes me ...
alex's user avatar
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3 answers
555 views

Why doesn't "aversion" correspond to "aver"?

I thought that the noun "aversion" was derived from the verb "aver". However, it seems they have different meanings. My question is, how can an English learner know such nouns? I don't think there ...
Cardinal's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
555 views

Is the word 'restrictionable' correct?

How do you form -able words? Which root do you have to attach the suffix to in order to make the new word? For example, is the word 'restrictionable' correct? restriction + -able ⇒ 'that may or ...
POIR's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
937 views

The 's' or 'es' word

Where do exactly put the 's' or 'es' word on the sentences? And why using that word on sentence? And when the right time to add the 's' or 'es' word?
user133893's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
410 views

Looking for the name of this type of grammatical term "im-", "mis-"

We can break some words in two or three parts. Example: Impossible = Im + possible Misconception = Miss + conception What does these type of grammatical term called? PS:I'm looking for this, because ...
Nadia Ali's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

How can I differentiate between the meaning in the following words

How can I difference between the meaning in the following words? - Audience it's noun - Audible it's adjective - Audition it's also noun - Auditory it's also adjective So, my question is we have ...
user87151's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
97 views

What is the difference between the -able that attaches to nouns and the -able that attaches to verbs?

Ie: marriageable vs acceptable honourable vs agreeable Are there any differences in the way this suffix functions?
user avatar
4 votes
5 answers
777 views

Do you perceive nouns ending with -a as somewhat feminine? [closed]

In Russian, most nouns ending with -a are considered feminine and decline accordingly (with -a considered an ending). But English has no declensions and no -a ending. So I wonder whether you perceive ...
Anixx's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
92 views

Why does Register become Registration (no e)?

Why does the English word Register become Registration, with the second 'e' being removed?
CGCampbell's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
965 views

What word has the root "vale" in it?

This really seems to be a strange question, but I just came cross a word valediction, I looked it up and found out that vale means "farewell". Even though I'm not that keen into etymology, this word ...
Evelyn1986's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
2k views

If "dis" makes antonym of a root word, then why doesn't "creet" have a meaning where discreet="dis"+creet?

In a dictionary, I found the word "discreet" which means: not likely to be seen or noticed by many people. I think maybe the word discreet is formed by : "dis"+creet. If it is so then what is the ...
showkey's user avatar
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