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Questions tagged [nouns]

A noun is a word (other than a pronoun) used to identify people, places, or things, or to name a particular one of those.

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Can we say “in upheaval times” instead of “in times of upheaval”?

A native English speaker told me rhat I should say “in times of upheaval” instead of “in upheaval times”. Now that confused me since I know that nouns can act as adjectives such as door-key, fire ...
Asim's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the chart correct by using "recycling" and not "recycle"?

The chart uses recycling and not recycle. Is the legend correct? So, landfill and compost can be used as a noun but recycle cannot? Collins dictionary shows it can be used as a noun: 7. the act or ...
newbie forever's user avatar
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Is it posible to intensify an adjective + noun using "so" or "very"?

I was wondering if it is possible to intensify an adjective plus a noun using the common intensifiers for adjectives only such as "very" or "so". According to grammar, if ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
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object pronoun + gerund

"Sometimes, I like a few things about being a social media influencer. / me being a social media influencer. I have seen people use the first structure, but also the second structure with ...
hwkal's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
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When someone says "piece" can we be 100% sure that it's not a motion picture?

This is a part of the Wikipedia page about Stanley Kubrick. This paragraph describes various freelancing jobs Stanley did as a photographer after finishing highschool. In 1948, he was sent to Portugal ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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What does "lockup" mean in this context?

This context comes from the movie "Sling Blade" (1996). (Karl is a person who was committed to a mental institution when he was a kid and who recently got out. The person speaking is his ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
168 views

Question regarding using singular or plural nouns

Recently I have been puzzled by this question below: There ___ a pen and two slices of cake. Should I put "is" or "are" for the blank above? Some argued that "is" is ...
Tsain's user avatar
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1 answer
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What does a history teacher at school ask a student to prepare by the next lesson? A report, a paper, a presentation or what?

For example, on the topic of "ancient Egyptian culture", "the life of Alexander the Great", "reasons of the Second World War" or something else. That is, the student ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 answer
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When to put "articles" before proper nouns?

I have learned some rules for using articles. I have noticed we can use articles before proper nouns but I am not totally sure. From my understanding, this is the rule for using articles before proper ...
Md Anik's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
681 views

When to use plural nouns and when not?

I am very confused about the use of articles and determiners. What I know:- If we use a count noun, we have to use either an article or pluralize it. For examples: I need pen -> This is ...
Md Anik's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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What's "call" mean in "A call issued to party members in a lawmaking body to ensure attendance at a particular time."

One of the definitions for the headword "whip" in the American Heritage Dictionary 2016 edition is: b. A call issued to party members in a lawmaking body to ensure attendance at a ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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"A giant tap of Welsh nostalgia"

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe) (choir practice, Phillip, the choirmaster; William, a chorister) (Phillip speaking) 'There's disagreement over the words' origins, but it was probably ...
philphil's user avatar
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The usage of "any other" with nouns

If the modifier any is used with singular and plural nouns, and other is only used with plural nouns (and uncontable), why when the word any is used before other estabilishes which form will take the ...
Daniel's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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"I've got a good voice, awful attitude."

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 13) 'I'm Martin Mussey.' He strides ahead on sturdy legs. 'I've got a good voice, awful attitude. I'll never be head ...
philphil's user avatar
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There were dogs in the room

a. Dogs were in the room. b. There were dogs in the room. c. People were in the room. d. There were people in the room. e. Bullets were on the desk. f. There were bullets on the desk. Is there any ...
azz's user avatar
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"She turns her head to look at him, play in her eyes."

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part I, Aberfan, chapter 10) William feels his spine against the cold wall, the floor bearing into his bony backside. He cklaps his shins, his body a ...
philphil's user avatar
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3 answers
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"Die" is a verb, "death" is a noun. "Perish" is a verb, but what's the noun for this verb?

"Die" is to "death" like "perish" to what? I'm interested in whether there's any noun for the verb "perish".
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
99 views

"The Bag of My Sister's" vs "The Bag of My Sister" - double possessive

The bag of my sister's The bag of my sister The bag of an actress The bag of an actress's when do we use and not use Apostrophe + s (for singular, uncountable, and irregular plural nouns) / ...
hwkal's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
71 views

What would you call people from Gaul?

So we have Italians, people from Italy but British, people from Britain. The Welsh from Wales etc. Is there a rule or do you just have to learn them all? What would you call people from Gaul? And the ...
WendyG's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Cut off and cutoff/cut-off

From my understanding: cut off is a verb and cutoff or cut-off is a noun. Am I right? Or is the BBC right? Can "cut off" also be a noun? I am confused because of the following sentences ...
E.V.'s user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
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your many books, Those some people - can we use determiners this way?

I have your many books. I have many books of yours. Those some people are about to come. Some of those people are about to come. I know that the 2nd version of each example is correct but I don't ...
hwkal's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
93 views

Should compound nouns treated as singular or plural

All, Which one is correct: "statistical techniques is " or "statistical techniques are" I Googled "statistical techniques is" and also "statistical techniques are&...
Kernel's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is a noun always preceded by a determiner?

I have studied a grammar rule that states that- A noun is always preceded by a determiner. So- Considering this 'John eats Mango' should be wrong. But I highly doubt it? Because what would I say if ...
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1 answer
101 views

Is 'Messi' Now a Recognized Word in Dictionaries? [closed]

I recently came across information stating that Lionel Messi's name has been incorporated into the Spanish dictionary as 'inmessionante.' This made me curious about how names and nouns related to ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
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0 answers
48 views

Words with plural-only nouns

Some words are used only with singular countable nouns, others only with plural countable nouns and others only with uncountable nouns Category singularcountable pluralcountable uncountable plural-...
Gostlly's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
630 views

What part of speech is an “-ing” form at the very beginning of a sentence?

I have been reading this paper and the following sentence is quite confusing to me: Hiking interest rates to get inflation under control when unemployment is rising could push unemployment even ...
Celius Stingher's user avatar
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2 answers
291 views

How is 'hard work' considered a noun?

An excerpt from my grammar lesson: In a formal context, 'due' should always be treated as an adjective, and 'due to' must therefore follow or refer back to a noun, as in: his success was due to hard ...
CrissyMoltisanti's user avatar
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2 answers
108 views

Suffix "ee" for nouns with a passive meaning

An employment exists when an "employer" employs an "employee". During the employment the "employer" is the active person, the person who employs, and the "employee&...
ceving's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
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'One such+noun' vs 'such a/an + noun'

What's difference in meaning and usage of 'such a/an + noun' and 'One such + noun'?. For example:- I have never seen such an example of government turning its back on illegal activity.” Never before ...
Zaman Nipu's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
389 views

What type of nouns are 'cattle', 'staff' and 'jeans'?

I was taught that there are four types of nouns: singular countable: journey, sheep, child plural countable: journeys, sheep, children singular uncountable: travel, water, fruit plural uncountable:...
Kyamond's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
128 views

I am a Chinese? [duplicate]

The most rampant and fossilized mistake I've heard from Chinese EFL speakers/learners is "a Chinese" where 'Chinese' was used as a singular noun, for instance, "I am a Chinese". I ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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2 answers
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Are there any specific rules for when to use a 'noun+noun' structure and when to use a 'noun+ apostrophe s, or noun+ s apostrophe' structure? [duplicate]

English is sometimes confusing. For instance, do we say 'Goat milk' or 'Goats' milk'? Or 'Cow meat' or 'Cows' meat'?
Haroon Parsa's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
238 views

Red as noun or adjective

In 'The team whose favorite color is red won the match' is 'RED' used as a noun or an adjective?
harvinder81's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
112 views

What are the plural forms of 'man Friday' and 'person Friday'?

What re the plural forms for 'man Friday' anf 'person Friday'? I've come across the variants 'men Friday' / 'man Fridays' / 'men Fridays' on the Internet. Which one is grammatically correct? Or are ...
Natalia's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What does a comma mean when it separates noun phrases?

A comma separating adjectives is understood as AND. What does a comma mean when it separates noun phrases? Flow is a state of mind, a level of concentration in which outside stimuli seem to fall away....
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
86 views

Neighbour John saw cat Whiskers near pharmacy GBN when car Mercedes was there

Are there any restrictions as to which title nouns can be placed before proper names? How correct is this sentence: 'Neighbour John saw cat Whiskers near pharmacy GBN when car Mercedes was there.'
waterlily99's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
206 views

What does a "three-card-monte man" mean in this context?

I know what a three-card-monte game is, but I don't know what the author wants to say when he says "he wasn't a three-card-monte-man". I don't find any really intuitive connection between ...
philphil's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
70 views

What does "phantom central" mean?

I would understand a central phantom. The word-order puzzles me. Does phantom central have a specific meaning? Is central a postpositive adjective there? Thanks in advance :). And now a madcap ...
philphil's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
89 views

When can noun adjuncts or attributive nouns be plural?

I know that noun adjuncts or attributive nouns (are they the same?) are usually singular. However, I often see native English speakers using plural forms in such nouns. For example, the following ...
goshawk's user avatar
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4 votes
8 answers
4k views

Does "I saw a blue car and bus" mean "blue bus" or any coloured bus?

What is the outcome of any and every sentence in the following sentence format when the rules of English grammar is applied upon them. sentence format <Noun Verb Determiner Adjective Noun ...
Stechavy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Should I use 'Combo', 'Set' or 'Assortment'?

In the context of common hardware items, for instance: 2 screws 2 bolts If these are sold in a single packaged product, should it be called a 'fastener combo', 'fastener set' or 'fastener assortment'...
Jiro F.'s user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
58 views

Are the words in "The 40th-anniversary restoration of the concert film" really in the right order? Is this semantical?

The 40th-anniversary restoration of the concert film is a funk spectacle. It has also united the band, which split up in 1991, to discuss the landmark. — NYT For someone learning English, the phrase &...
harola barros's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
504 views

Difference between 'gamer' and 'player'?

I saw a sentence today: Back in the last century, gamers were sometimes known to take advantage of players with slow (as in dialup) links; an opponent could be eliminated literally before he or she ...
kokomi's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
145 views

Is this sentence an acceptable idiom? "Is there any park near here?"

I know that we can use "any" with singular nouns, but there needs to be a proper context as well, such as "Any park needs a playground for kids, I believe". But what about the ...
Shahrooz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
56 views

What is a English noun without determiner?

I read a sentence today: The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) uses a retransmission timer to ensure data delivery in the absence of any feedback from the remote data receiver. I saw in the ... of ...
kokomi's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
310 views

Count vs Number of

I am a software engineer and I struggle with the variable names, regarding this scope, what would be the best suited term for a counter. For example if I want to count parts, would "Parts Counted&...
DonMiguelSanchez's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
79 views

We can't remove article from a singular countable noun. So is that a noun modifier or complement?

We can't remove article from a singular countable noun. So is that a noun modifier or complement? We generally call it a modifier though it's mandatory...But why?🤔
Salim Uddin's user avatar
8 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is the 'a nice' in 'a nice to have' grammatical?

In this context, 'a nice' is used as a noun as 'a must': Design’s role has moved from a nice to have to a must have to a differentiator I wonder if the 'indefinite article + adjective' form can ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
67 views

Which way of saying is more general? [closed]

Consider the following two sentences, where I highlighted the differences between them: Technology has drastically improved the easy of obtaining information: from making a phone call in the forests ...
A Slow Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Mixing different forms of a noun in a paragraph?

I am sking if it is allowed to mix the singular form, the plural form, and "the + n" form of a noun within a paragraph, and whether the meaning changes at all. For example, are both (1) and (...
A Slow Learner's user avatar

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