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Questions tagged [numbers]

Cardinal and ordinal numbers and numerals: zero, one, forty-two, 3.14, etc. Use this tag for questions related to numbers in the mathematical sense and expressions involving numbers. For questions about singular/plural, use [grammatical-number].

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Why are "half of a loaf" and "half of an orange" not correct, whereas "half of a pizza" is correct?

my conclusion from forum.thefreedictionary.com: half of a loaf — incorrect half a loaf — correct half of an orange — incorrect half an orange — correct my conclusion from english.stackexchange.com: ...
Loviii's user avatar
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"X increased two times." — What can this mean?

my own sentence: (1) X increased two times. What meanings can (1) have?: (1a) X that increased to two times is two X. (1b) X that increased by two times is three X. (1c) X increased twice.
Loviii's user avatar
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1) "Six and a quarter of a mile" — Is this correct?; 2) "Six and a quarter of a million" — Is this correct?

As far as I understand, "a quarter of something" is correct. But I'm interested in whether we can add a number to the beginning of this phrase or not. For example, is "six and a quarter ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1) "A ten-thousand-dollar profit" — Can we say this without "dollar"? 2) "A ten-thousand-head growth" — Can we say this without "head"?

All examples below are mine. (1a) a ten-thousand-dollar profit — I think this is correct. (1b) a ten-thousand profit — Is this correct? (2a) a ten-thousand-head growth — I think this is correct. (2b) ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 answer
44 views

"How many strong was the army?", "How many fold was the increase?" — Can we use "strong" and "fold" this way?

All examples below are mine. I'm interested to find out how "strong" and "fold" (when they relate to numbers) behave in questions. Can they remain or must they be removed? (1) It ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 answers
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How to pronounce "the 1900s" and "the 1940s"?

How to pronounce "the 1900s"?: (1a) the one thousand, nine hundreds (1b) the nineteen zero zeros (1c) the nineteen hundreds How to pronounce "the 1940s"?: (2a) the one thousand, ...
Loviii's user avatar
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20 votes
5 answers
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Why is zero plural?

I saw this sentence in the math textbook. For example, if we choose two 2s, zero 3s, and one 5, we get the divisor Here they said zero 3s and one 5. Two is plural and one is singular, which is ...
user67275's user avatar
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2 answers
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"rise 2%" VS "rise at 2%" VS "rise by 2%"

I thought we can say only "verb + by + number" but I came across "verb + at + number" and "verb + number". I got interested in whether there is any difference between ...
Loviii's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
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"a single" vs "one single"

School dissertations typically revolve around a single idea. School dissertations typically revolve around one single idea. Should we use "a single" or "one single", and why?
jewels's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is it possible to read 4,500,000,000 as four thousand five hundred million?

Is it possible to read 4,500,000,000 as four thousand five hundred million? I know the number is four billion five hundred million, but wonder if there is another option.
jung won kim's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
89 views

How to say numbers correctly

1/ How can we say such numbers as 3.500, 27.500, etc.? Is it possible to say "three hundred and a half", "twenty seven and a half"? 2/ Is it ok to say 4.5 as "four point five&...
Zina B's user avatar
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2 answers
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Does this refer to the original or sale price? W: "How much were they?" M: "70 dollars. I got them on sale. They were 30% off."

W: I like your sports shoes very much. How much were they? M: 70 dollars. I got them on sale. They were 30% off. What was the original price of the new shoes? A. 120 dollars. B. 70 dollars. C. 100 ...
ForOU's user avatar
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How to correctly describe the size of the army using "strong"

How to say properly: "They keep an army in Kashmir of the size of 30000 strong " Or "They have deployed an army 30000 strong" Meaning it has 30000 soldiers? Do I need to put other ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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"An a hundred millilitre bottle"

After searching online for some time, I still haven't found anything quite like my question (which probably indicates that I'm wrong). Even though English is my native language I just found out that I'...
David's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
669 views

What's the difference between "35 mile ish commutes" and "35ish mile commutes"?

ell.stackexchange.com: (1) 35 mile ish commutes Such placement of "ish" isn't clear to me. Why is it grammatical to place "ish" after "mile"? What does (1) mean? my ...
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Zeroish, oneish, twoish, threeish, …, one hundred and fifty sevenish, …, a thousandish, …, a millionish, … — Can they all be used?

I'd like to find out when we can use "-ish" with numbers. Am I right that we can add "-ish" to a number when we want to say an approximate number of something/someone? For example: ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
147 views

Space or no space? '3x bigger' vs. '3 x bigger'

Which one is a correct form in English? '3x bigger forest' or '3 x bigger forest? With a space after the number or without a space?
Paja's user avatar
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3 answers
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Is there any difference between "A + ADJECTIVE + NUMBER + NOUN" and "NUMBER + ADJECTIVE + NOUN"? (e.g. "a full ten bottles" VS "ten full bottles")

Are "A + ADJECTIVE + NUMBER + NOUN" and "NUMBER + ADJECTIVE + NOUN" interchangeable? If not, then what is the difference between them? For example (a-variants are from ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
73 views

How to read the telephone number?

The number in the sententce: Is this empire 5-4093? I have heard someone read the number as five to four thousand and ninety-three,can it be read as five four zero nine three or five four o nine ...
showkey's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
161 views

Could anyone explain why is the article used before percentage? Is there any grammatical rule regarding this?

Could anyone explain why is the article used before percentage? Is there any grammatical rule regarding this? Most countries would be very happy with a 7% growth in this environment. Link But ...
John's user avatar
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20 votes
5 answers
7k views

How do you read "10/10"?

How do you read "10/10", as in "10/10, no notes"? it is a score! The "no notes" comes from the acting community, I think: you've done so well, that the director has no ...
Cocobop's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the difference between "the number of" and "the numbers of"?

I read an IELTS test, which has the sentence: Universities should accept equal numbers of male and female students in every subject. At first, I thought it mentions two objects (male and female), so ...
trungbk's user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
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Does prior refer to the one which is exactly one place earlier, or any one which is before the current one?

https://www.etymonline.com/word/prior says prior (adj.) "earlier; preceding, as in order of time," 1714, from Latin prior "former, previous, first;" figuratively "superior, ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
620 views

What does "40-odd years" mean? [duplicate]

I heard "40-odd years" on https://youtu.be/9QCgqQdmr0M?t=59: What does "40-odd years" mean? I found https://ell.stackexchange.com/a/44142/3023 but the usage of odd wasn't made ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
535 views

Doors No. 1 and 2 or Door Nos. 1 and 2?

If there are three doors in a building numbered No.1, No.2, and No.3. When referring to them collectively, do I say "Doors No. 1, 2, and 3"; or "Door Nos. 1, 2, and 3"?
Ashvij Putta's user avatar
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1 answer
309 views

On/in/within when used with a range of numbers

Here is my troubling sentence: The student scored 1364 on/in/within a range of 987-2198. Which preposition do you recommend?
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1 vote
1 answer
158 views

When do you spell out numbers? [duplicate]

I have been learning English as a foreign language and my teacher told me instead of "I'm a 17-year-old girl" I should better write "I'm a seventeen-year-old girl". Why does it ...
Emilia's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
208 views

numeral, number word belonging to which word class

According to available information, there are eight word classes (=part of speech) in English: noun, adjective, adverb, verb, preposition, pronoun, interjection, conjunction What is a word class of ...
Jene's user avatar
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0 answers
5k views

"two weeks' time" vs "two-week time"

I know that: (1) in two weeks' time - correct (2) in two-week time - incorrect But I don't know what will be without "in". For example (my own sentences): (3) Two weeks' time is enough for a ...
Loviii's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
3k views

Which number is "four and forty thousand"?

Reading The Lady of the Lake by Andrzej Sapkowski and at one point he describes the number of troops in the army as "four and forty thousand". Which number would that be? 44,000? 440,000? 40,...
Michael Munta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why are Years Cardinal?

It is the year twenty-twenty, and the world has changed. This is a phrase that is odd in a way that I didn't realise until recently. Normally, calendar units are meant to be ordinal. 'The twenty-...
vicky_molokh's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
121 views

How to understand "add the first number to itself"

If you multiply one number by another, you add the first number to itself as many times as is indicated by the second number. For example 2 multiplied by 3 is equal to 6. (Collins Dictionary) 2*3= ...
ForOU's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
660 views

Is 'two' a noun?

I've been taught that 'number words' are names for numbers, this implies they should be considered nouns, how come we can have phrases like: 'Two apples' 'One person' 'There are two of them' Where '...
Confused's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Comparison of two categories over a specific period of time

Year: 2009 / 2019 Mobile use: 15% / 26% Tablet use: 5% / 19% what is the correct way to describe changes in two different years? I have tried to describe the changes in three different ...
DrDentMBR's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
499 views

What would you call a number that's 5 or 6 zeros past the decimal point? [closed]

Today the current price of the Shiba Inu CryptoCoin is listed as $0.0000017 USD. How would you phrase this number?
Sunny Profit's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
60 views

seeing a therapist

They are both seeing a therapist. They are seeing a therapist. Do those necessarily mean that they are seeing the same therapist? Could they be used if each of them is seeing a different therapist?
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
69 views

Read 2,000,005, use oh (o) or and?

https://youtu.be/ioldoJQYKyQ?t=155 teaches us that 205 can be read as two o five. Then how do I read 2,000,005, a number with multiple 0 in the middle? two million o o o o o five or simply two million ...
Gqqnbig's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
69 views

"some" vs "about"

All examples are mine. Could you help me to deal with them? (1a) There are some thousand people. - as far as I know, it's correct (1b) There are some a thousand people. - ??? (I don't know if it's ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,987
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Understanding "between... and... "

He wrote between 20 and 30 novels. The eight thieves served a sentence of berween 2 and 7 years. Are they shorthand of respectively: 1a. He wrote between 20 novels and 30 novels. 2a. The thieves ...
ForOU's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
53 views

How large "thousands" can I convert it to "hundreds" in speaking?

I still have a problem with pronouncing big numbers in English. Aside from all other issues, I found one single problem that I still haven't figured out how to use properly or "if" I can use ...
Gwangmu Lee's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
72 views

In arithmetic, what is the generic name for a number written in an arbitrary base?

A number can be written in various bases. We commonly use base 10 and the resulting number is called decimal. If it is written in base 2 then it is called binary. A list of over 100 such names, as in ...
Maesumi's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
949 views

"in the hundreds" vs "in hundreds"

I'd like to know the difference between "in the hundreds" and "in hundreds". For this purpose I've found some examples: collinsdictionary.com: 1a The temperature was in the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
174 views

How to say "the majority of our participants" and follow that with a number and percebtage [closed]

I want to express that the majority of participants and also want to say the number of participants (20) and percentage (50%) were students. I need to use this structure in different contexts. Does ...
randomname's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
76 views

The number consisting of two numbers

I need to describe the following set of numbers as simply as possible. 12345-12345678 The problem is that the first number is always a five-digit number but the length of the second number can be ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
26 views

one incident in each city

a. Today we had gun-related incidents in Los Angeles, New York, Austin and Tampa. b. Today we had a gun-related incident in Los Angeles, New York, Austin and Tampa. c. Today we had a gun-related ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
124 views

Difference between 16 and sixteen [duplicate]

Which one is correct -- The method uses a classifier technique where there are 16 features used. and The method uses a classifier technique where there are sixteen features used. ? Explain why.
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
40 views

"After age 70" or "after the age of 70"? [closed]

I cannot really find an answer: I know commonly we say "at the age of 70". But when I see sentences with "after", there is typically no article or preposition, and it becomes ...
Markazali's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

Calculus II, or Calculus 2, or Calculus Two, is there a preference? [closed]

Judging from the way Super Bowls are named I guess "Calculus II" is the right one. But what is the rule if there is any?
Maesumi's user avatar
  • 135
1 vote
0 answers
532 views

What is the natural way to say "increment by 0.5"?

I have a digital scale. The number on the display goes up like 0.0kg, 0.5kg, 1.0kg, 1.5kg... What are good ways to describe this? My ideas are below. This can scale every 0.5kg. The number increments ...
dmjy's user avatar
  • 275
-1 votes
1 answer
331 views

What does "thousands of hundreds of people" mean? [closed]

What the title says. How many people are there when a larger quantity (thousands) is followed by a smaller quantity (hundreds). Is this even grammatical? I can understand "hundreds of thousands&...
lil' barbussy's user avatar

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