Questions tagged [objects]

A noun phrase denoting a person or thing that is the recipient of the action of a transitive verb

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
1 answer
23 views

How should I read the sentence of multiple objects

This is a extract from session 6 'word power made easy Norman lewis' book. "The orthodontist specializes in improving your "bite," retracting "buck," and by means of braces ...
Ansh's user avatar
  • 91
1 vote
2 answers
82 views

Infinitive objective complement

Why do some verbs can have “to infinitive” as object complement? I found him to be marvelous But others cannot: I painted the house blue And why do some verbs can omit the “to” in infinitive but some ...
Gimletful's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

Clauses after prepositions

Many sources say to use noun phrases, nouns, or objective pronouns as objects of preposition. As per that, "Like I said" should be corrected to "As I said." At the same time, we ...
brp7's user avatar
  • 122
2 votes
1 answer
57 views

Transitive and intransitive verbs, parallelism and object [closed]

This is my second question marked to be closed. If I knew the language very well, I wouldn't ask any questions here. I removed the original question. Let the moderators write the question here the way ...
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
270 views

Subject question vs. object question

In the text book that I am supposed to use in my lessons I have this explanation on the difference between subject and object questions: I want you to especially pay attention to this sentence above: ...
brilliant's user avatar
  • 4,305
1 vote
2 answers
110 views

"I" vs "me" when subject of sentence is implied

The image above says "The hard working employee and I on payday (Our paychecks are the same)". I am convinced it should me "me", not "I", since the sentence without the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

"London is an easy place to get lost in." — What is the object of "in" here: "an easy place", "a place" or "place"?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (pages 1248-1249), "hollow to-infinitivals licensed by an attributive adjective": [i] London is an easy place to get lost in __. [ii] The price ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,232
0 votes
2 answers
54 views

Multiple consecutive verbs with ambiguous objects

I found the following sentence: It was a fine gun which he forged, stocked, and completed himself. I can't just figure out the exact meaning of "completed himself", does that mean: ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

Do the subject and object have to agree in number? For example: "Tigers (plural) are a wild animal (singular)"

Does the plurality of the object have to agree with the plurality of the subject? For example, which one of the following sentences is correct? Tigers are wild animals and they live in the jungle. ...
A Slow Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Where is the object of "into" in "a sauce for dipping pieces of food into"?

Wikipedia.org doesn't mark "into" as a preposition that can be used intransitively, i. e. "into" must always have an object. Here are my three phrases where "a thick cold ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,232
1 vote
2 answers
45 views

infinitive functioning as a noun or an adjective

I got him to repair the bike. In this sentence is the infinitive functioning as a noun or an adjective? Or without context is it just an <object + object compliment>?
sprbndt's user avatar
  • 13
3 votes
2 answers
509 views

"Please give me until tomorrow morning" Is this expression correct?

https://eikaiwa.weblio.jp/information/business-material/suggesting-solutions-to-problems This is an English lesson material that is used in an online English class. Please look at the bottom of PART ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,468
0 votes
1 answer
87 views

Can we omit the subject and object at the same time?

Can we omit the subject and object at the same time? example: Although he is hurt by her, he still loves her. (nothing omitted) Although hurt by her, he still loves her. (subject omitted only) ...
leaningEnglish's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

What is the sense the "either" as an object in the sentence?

This is the first time I see the either at the end of a sentence to be an object. I don’t think women and men are different, and I don’t even think age groups are either. I guess the either means ...
Y. zeng's user avatar
  • 1,233
0 votes
1 answer
135 views

In the sentence "She ate pizza at school," is "school" an indirect object?

I know that in the sentence "I'm doing a project for school," "school" is indeed the indirect object, but in the title sentence, is "school" a indirect object there as ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

Can I add an object after the verb "live"?

I wrote the following sentence They lived a lot of good experiences together. but started wondering whether it is correct to add an object after "live". Here are some other ways to say ...
rdrg109's user avatar
  • 199
0 votes
1 answer
150 views

Does the sentence containing "I’ve done made" make sense?

I’ve done made a black tea with a slice of lime on it . it appeared in a group chat that include many non-English native speakers and seems odd to me. since "done" can be a transitive verb, ...
novice's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

adjective or noun + for + object?

It's impossible for the job to be finished in time. It's a good idea for us to travel in separate cars. There is a definition in the books : adjective + for + object + infinitive noun+ for + object + ...
emilywenly's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

A grammar question about object

I've read a sentence. But a series of interruptions and heckles showed the uphill task it will be to find co-operation. "the uphill task it will be to find co-operation." is object. But I ...
zpd's user avatar
  • 5
-1 votes
1 answer
56 views

reinforce + that-clause

I don't know if it's okay for the verb "reinforce" to take a that-clause as an object. Is it a new usage? Following learners' dictionaries, I'd have expected a noun object, such as "the ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
1 vote
2 answers
79 views

Anticipatory “it” representing the object in a gerundial phrase

Can anyone explain to me why we need the dummy “it” in the sentence 1 and 2, but not in 3 and 4? 1– We found it very useless trying to persuade him to go with us. 2– I don’t think it worthwhile taking ...
Piermo's user avatar
  • 155
1 vote
2 answers
150 views

can a word be both an object and a subject in a clause?

She handed him a cup of tea that he knew without tasting would be exactly as he liked it. Is "that" the object of "he knew" and the subject of "would be…"? In other ...
wonderfulwonder's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
149 views

object + infinitive?

In a book there is an expression like '' Many verbs are followed by object + infinitive '' I want you to listen. They told me to go. What is meant by '' object '' in this statement ? Yes i know these ...
emilywenly's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
590 views

"I doing sth", "me doing sth", "my doing sth" as a subject or an object

I'm learning English and it sometimes confuses me what constructions, either clause or gerund, are acceptable as subjects or objects. In a question I asked previously, I asked about the grammaticality ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 73
0 votes
0 answers
124 views

"I doing something", "me doing something", "my doing something" as an object

Consider the following four sentences: She doesn't like that I talked rudely to her. She doesn't like I talking rudely to her. She doesn't like my talking rudely to her. She doesn't like me talking ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 73
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

About indirect object in sentence

I came across the sentence "He charges me money". Can the verb "charge" take an indirect object?
Petro Probka's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
497 views

Pay someone vs Pay to someone

I know we don't use "Pay to someone," but is there a reason? In terms of grammar, it seems correct. Pay (transitive verb) + someone (direct object) Pay (intransitive verb) + to someone (...
A S's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Can the subject of a sentence also be its object?

Can the subject of a sentence also be its object? In the sentence, "There came a man who was sent from God," is "man" both the subject of "came" and the object of "...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
44 views

How do you determine the object of a verb in a rather long sentence like this?

Eric Leed identifies and provides historical, sociological and psychological insights about the different elements that together combine to form a journey, carried out by a traveller. In the above ...
burningeyebrows's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

Why does this sentence 'I find it difficult to speak English fluently' have no copula? [closed]

Moreover, is 'I find it is difficult to speak English fluently' incorrect or unnatural?
Beau Garçon Idol Lucianus's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
27 views

A second essential function vision serves is to facilitate major changes. Is the sentence grammatical?

I came across this sentence and am not sure whether it is grammatical. It looks like the clause "a second essential function vision serves" functions as a subject and is embedded into the ...
Chan Tony Y's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
173 views

Can transitive verbs not be followed by an object?

Here's an example of a transitive verb "found" not followed by an object. Can anyone tell me what kind of sentence structure is that which makes this possible? Some people with pain, ...
Chan Tony Y's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
991 views

It's us! / It's we!

It was him who meessed up everything. It was he who messed up everything. It's them who was there. It's them who were there. It's they who was there. It's they who were there. It's me who is sorry. ...
IlyaTretyakov's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

The object of "Address a concern on"

I came across a sentence below: Its purpose is to address a concern on the part of the xxx staff that conceptual models of processes constitute a major source of uncertainty. (xxx is the name of an ...
T. B.'s user avatar
  • 17
4 votes
2 answers
369 views

a verb "know" as a transitive verb and an intransitive verb

Can I say only "Do you know?" without saying the object in this case?: I'm looking for a flower shop around here. Do you know? How can I distinguish cases where I need to say object and ...
Nigutumok's user avatar
  • 556
1 vote
1 answer
914 views

The passive voice with prepositional objects

The question concerns changing of the form and place of the direct object and prepositional objects in a sentence after it was reverted to the passive voice. For example let's consider the following ...
xyz's user avatar
  • 181
3 votes
2 answers
438 views

intransitive use of "drink"

In the following sentence, the object it is necessary, isn't it? But why? a. The milk was so hot that I couldn't drink [it]. The verb drink has an intransitive use, not necessarily related to ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Can the verb "entail" be complemented by a "that"-clause?

When I look up the verb entail in my dictionaries (Cambridge, Merriam-Webster and Longman) I get examples showing that this verb may be complemented by noun phrases (e.g. This will entail major ...
Helen's user avatar
  • 1,724
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

"... hours he spent leisurely" vs. "... hours he spent them leisurely."

The first two hours he spent (them) leisurely. Google Docs suggested that I remove them in that sentence. But if I do that, spent doesn't have an object anymore. Or maybe it's okay to omit objects in ...
wyc's user avatar
  • 7,155
0 votes
2 answers
203 views

How to make an object question for the object of infinitive of purpose?

Object questions are easy, if in the sentence there is just a main verb, showing the whole action. What if there is an infinitive of purpose with an (prepositional) object? How does one make object ...
yewgeniy's user avatar
  • 135
0 votes
2 answers
117 views

She was told a joke

She was told a joke Is a joke an object here? Or maybe a compulsory adjunct? Cuz I think she was told doesn't make sense on its own. I'm confused, can someone help?
Angyang's user avatar
  • 524
0 votes
1 answer
122 views

Subject and object questions

I am studying the subject and object questions and I saw an example here Asking object - subject questions. "Did" or past form of the verb in Past Simple but I'm not sure it that's correct: ...
Mary's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
9k views

What is the difference between was/were and did? [closed]

I am looking / would like to learn basic difference or understanding when to use did and was/were in the past tense. looking answer with example that will be greatly appreciated from the community. ...
Nadeem Taj's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

What is the real function of objects?

I expect you to be my friend. I expect that you’ll be my friend. I see the only difference is that “you” is an object in sentence 1 and that-clause is an object in sentence 2. In this situation, I ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
96 views

How to use the word 'unexpectedly'?

What would be the correct interpretation of the word 'unexpectedly' in a sentence. For example. I spoke to her unexpectedly. My question regarding the above sentence is what is the correct ...
Josh 's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
40 views

Can I omit an object after 'those who + verb?'

Those who speak English respect those who don't speak English. Those who speak English respect those who don't speak. Those who speak English respect those who don't. I believe the first and third ...
nealK's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Is this use of 'whom' correct? [duplicate]

Apologies for the subject matter but, from a recent novel: This was a person I had known for several years, since college, whom I had seen vomit, whose life-changing cover letter I had basically ...
AmbroseChapel's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
34 views

With Tom's being a VIP, we should treat him very well

With Tom being a VIP, we should treat him very well. With Tom's being a VIP, we should treat him very well. Do they both sound correct?
Mr. X's user avatar
  • 848
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

What would you write as the object of this sentence?

Learning to respect others is important. Is the object: "to respect others" or "to respect"?
NUMERICALUDD's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
59 views

dislike getting married?

I'm wondering if the object of "dislike" should be something that is naturally repeatable. Does it make sense to say the following? Many women dislike getting married.
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986