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Questions tagged [ordinals]

Words like 'first', 'second', and 'third' – numerals which denote a place in a sequence.

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"He tied for <the> first place."

britannica.com: (1) He tied for first place. The first place is the only. Then why is there not "the"? I mean: (2) He tied for the first place. What is the difference between (1) and (2)?
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Can we describe someone as a person's "fifth forefather"?

John's father was Max; Max's father was Jones; Jones' father was Douglas; Douglas' father was Andrew; Andrews's father was Browning; Browning's father was Smith. Can we say? Browning is John's fifth ...
English-Learner's user avatar
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1 answer
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Zero article with ordinal numbers

Recently I've seen several examples of phrases like 'awarded for first place' on Wikipedia etc. (E.g., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_ribbon) I think I understand when definite or indefinite ...
ledonter's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
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"We're stuck between floors two and three". Is the definite article implied?

When you name the floor you're on, you say "I'm on the [an ordinal number] floor.", which totally makes sense! So why do people, for example, say "We're stuck between floors two and three"? Do they ...
Let's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
193 views

English article "A" vs "The"

In English Grammar, before ordinals (first, second, third...), we always use the definite article "the." Consider the sentence below. If the same person calls a second time within a 15-minute ...
Anonymous's user avatar
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1 answer
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"it is at 5 minute and 40 second" or "it is at 5 minutes and 40 seconds"?

Tell me please which sentence is correct. The part where he is saying it is at 4 minute and 45 second. The part where he is saying it is at 4 minutes and 45 seconds. Or is this one better? ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
225 views

ordinal numbers modifying uncountable nouns?

I'd like to know whether it is grammatical in contemporary English to modify an uncountable noun with ordinal numbers. Is it right to say, "first disobedience" or "second importance"?
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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How to ask for ordinal date?

Let's say my friend's just arrived in New York 4 days ago. I could ask him "How many days have you been in New York?", and he would answer me something like "4 days." But if I want him to answer me, "...
Thayakorn Rakwetpakorn's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
427 views

ordinal numbers with uncountable nouns

I know countables can be used with ordinal numbers. We can say "the second book," etc. But what about uncountables like "information"? I'd appreciate your help.
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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'grade four' or 'fourth grade' -- which is grammatical and formal?

I just came across the following sentence; How many grade four kanji have you memorised? Is that formal? Should there better be a hyphen like 'grade-four'?
Zeeshan Ali's user avatar
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2 answers
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“The first, it is” or “First, it is”?

In the following sentence, Does the "the" article come before the "first" word? I have two reasons for my claim. The first, it is . . .
Mohammad Afrashteh's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
355 views

A word denoting something taking place for the last time in an indefinitely large series

I've been looking for the word denoting something taking place for the latest time in an indefinitely large series, for example, the solar eclipse occurring for the______ th(?) time from the beginning ...
Victor B.'s user avatar
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2 answers
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Should it be M_th or M^th?

I am wondering when I want to refer to for example, third instance of something, should the rd be superscript or subscript? What about when the exact digit is replaced with a variable like M?
lonesome's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
8k views

Use of "the" and cardinals

I've read that no article is used before cardinals (one, two, three... etc) but ordinals, but here in the following sentence this rule is voided. What is the reason behind it? The cities show an ...
M.Naeem Ahmad's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
257 views

How to write ordinal expressions in mathematical texts?

I was wondering if there is a rule or recommendation how to write ordinal expressions if instead of a number, we have a variable or a formula. For example, it is common to come across to the following ...
Milos's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
911 views

A question about using definite article with ordinal numbers: "content with third place" or "content with the third place"?

I was reading the definition of the verb "content" came across with this example: "he had to be content with third place" Shouldn't it be: "he had to be content with the third place" I thought ...
Cardinal's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
2k views

Different Zero and Nol

I am confused with this one, and I have two questions about that What"s the difference between Zero and Nol? Is 'nol' is accepted in English? And 1st First, 2nd Second, and what about ...
Engkus Kusnadi's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
558 views

How to ask a question which implies an ordinal number as an answer? [duplicate]

How do I ask a question which implies an ordinal number as an answer? E.g. if I want to ask "which exit should I take on a motorway?" and I don't want to get an answer "left" or "right" or "the next ...
il--ya's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
153 views

How to write about ordered things?

Can anyone help me about the correct usage of nd and th ? The nth best grade The n'th best grade The nnd best grade What are they called in the grammar ? Which one of them is grammatically ...
Cardinal's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
4k views

Article before ordinal numbers

That first season wrapped everything up nicely and when I heard that a second season would be made I started to wonder if it would be able to reach the same quality as the first season. Source: ...
bart-leby's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
418 views

Should I use an apostrophe in ordinals?

John Smith was born in Netherlands, on the 21'st of May 1981. Is this sentence grammatically correct?
Heniek Kowalski's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
5k views

What does "every fourth person" mean?

What does this mean? "every fourth person is fat."
user21669's user avatar
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29 votes
7 answers
17k views

Asking the position of a person in a sequence

How to ask the position(?) of a president (like 10th) of a country, correctly?
Nalaka526's user avatar
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