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Questions tagged [parsing]

This tag is for questions about the form, function, and syntactic relationships of each word in a sentence.

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Correct place of adjectival clause

A few stars are known which are hardly bigger than the earth, but most of them are so large that hundreds of thousands of Earth's can be packed inside each and leave room to spare. Usually, an ...
Abid's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
32 views

"It's a span of a few hundred miles to cross the state." — By what rule was this sentence made up?

britannica.com: (1) It's a span of a few hundred miles to cross the state. As I understand, (1) means: (2) We need to cover a span of a few hundred miles in order to cross the state. But I can't ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
41 views

"The jury rendered a verdict of not guilty." — "noun phrase + of + adjective phrase" is an unusual word order to me. How to parse it?

britannica.com: (1) The jury rendered a verdict of not guilty. "Noun phrase + of + noun phrase" is a typical construction. But "noun phrase + of + adjective phrase" is a very ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
59 views

"I have no idea <of> what you're talking about." — By what rule can we take "of" away here?

my own examples: (1) No idea of what we will do occured to me. — I think it's correct. (2) No idea what we will do occured to me. — I think it's incorrect. That is, "of" is obligatory. ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
41 views

To whom does "her" refer in "Her relationship with then-Senator Palpatine and his successor had been calm"?

In Star Wars: Queen's Shadow, Padme, the former queen and the current senator of Naboo, has returned to her home planet after a visit to Breha. Note that Palpatine is the previous senator for Naboo, ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
369 views

Who does "she" refer to in "She wasn’t the jealous type, but she’d always been curious, and Sabé rarely did anything first."?

In Star Wars: Queen's Shadow, there is a conversation between Padmé and Sabé: “Do you like him enough?”, Padme said. “I don’t know,” Sabé said. “We’ve talked about it, so it’s not like I’m leading ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
88 views

"At last, a women's magazine to explode the myth that thin equals beautiful." — Is it grammatical to build sentences without a predicator?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) At last, a women's magazine to explode the myth that thin equals beautiful. It seems to me (1) consists only of the adjunct "at last" and the subject (the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
26 views

He wants to open his own business, but needs a push in the right direction to get him started

He wants to open his own business, but needs a push in the right direction to get him started. Source: https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/push_2 Does "in the right ...
Englishgood's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

the delay before data begins to move after it has been sent an instruction to do so

From the Oxford's Learner's dictionary definition of latency: latency: the delay before data begins to move after it has been sent an instruction to do so Do "before data begins to move" ...
Englishgood's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
62 views

What is the Subject of the sentence: "Wednesday night found Hermione and Harry sitting alone in the common room,..."

About this quote from Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone: Wednesday night found Hermione and Harry sitting alone in the common room, long after everyone else had gone to bed. The first clause, in ...
Jesse's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
41 views

What does “it” refer to in “it was too much to think of and sit still”

The following quote is from Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser: He would plead until her anger would melt—until she would forgive him. Suddenly he thought: “Supposing she isn't out there—suppose she ...
f6pafd's user avatar
  • 345
2 votes
1 answer
51 views

What part of speech is "her" and "drive" in "I watched her drive."?

Would "her" be the direct object of the transitive verb, "watched"? Or would the verb phrase itself act as the direct object?
Caleb's user avatar
  • 135
7 votes
4 answers
720 views

How does the sentence 'Who did Tom say saw him?' work?

I understand the meaning but not the sentence formation/syntax. In my mother tongue this would make no sense. I would rather say: Who according to Tom saw him? Perhaps the following will help to ...
kyadere's user avatar
  • 156
1 vote
1 answer
65 views

take charge/control of

She was chosen to take charge/control of the organization. Do native speakers think that "take charge/control" is a verb and that "of" is a preposition and that "the ...
Englishgood's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
118 views

tourism studies and the social sciences in general

The concept of overtourism rests on a particular assumption about people and places common in tourism studies and the social sciences in general. Both are seen as clearly defined and demarcated. ...
Englishgood's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
52 views

the facts of providing a home with another family

the fact of providing a home in an institution run by the local authority for children who cannot live with their parents or the fact of providing a home with another family for children who cannot ...
Aaaaaaassssss's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
79 views

"Where" : is there a meal where you eat the same thing every day? What?

I came across this question where "where" is used as the pronoun of place in time. I don't understand the function Is there a meal where you eat the same thing every day? what?
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
140 views

Parsing of the sentence "I have been happily married for nine years."

I have been happily married for nine years. I want parsing of this sentence. Married I think adjective and happily is an Adverb. Here happily mean I think -In a happy manner
Sam's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
97 views

"London is an easy place to get lost in." — What is the object of "in" here: "an easy place", "a place" or "place"?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (pages 1248-1249), "hollow to-infinitivals licensed by an attributive adjective": [i] London is an easy place to get lost in __. [ii] The price ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
75 views

"<Long> a proponent of government health insurance, he pointed out that millions of Americans have no health insurance at all."

cambridge.org: (1) Long a proponent of government health insurance, he pointed out that millions of Americans have no health insurance at all. I can't understand the grammar of using "long" ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

"the much more common" vs "much the more common"

from ell.stackexchange.com: (1) Of the two examples, #2 is the much more common. (2) Of the two examples, #2 is much the more common. Am I right that?: "Much" in (1) and (2) is an adverb. &...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Is "from her" modifying the flower or the verb buy?

No one wanted to buy a flower from her. "wanted" is transitive, flower is the direct object and I'm a little confused about the modifier "from her".
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
72 views

Where is the object of "into" in "a sauce for dipping pieces of food into"?

Wikipedia.org doesn't mark "into" as a preposition that can be used intransitively, i. e. "into" must always have an object. Here are my three phrases where "a thick cold ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

parsing "The shop stocks everything from cigarettes to recycled loo paper."

thefreedictionary.com: (1) The shop stocks everything from cigarettes to recycled loo paper. Am I right that?: The noun phrase "everything from cigarettes to recycled loo paper" is the ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Could you parse "She was younger than any of us had figured on"?

an example of "to figure on something" from ldoceonline.com: She was younger than any of us had figured on. So, the phrase is "to figure on X". But where is the X in this sentence? ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

What part of speech is "free" in "Free was the best deal I could get"?

Free was the best deal I could get. A subject should be a noun, but free is an adjective, which confuses me. If this sentence is correct and natural, then I have two guesses: First, there is an ...
joy2020's user avatar
  • 1,056
0 votes
1 answer
135 views

Parsing "Happiness makes up in height for what it lacks in length" [closed]

This is the title of a Robert Frost poem: Happiness makes up in height for what it lacks in length. I am having difficulties in understanding the correct interpretation.
Sam's user avatar
  • 1,925
-5 votes
1 answer
72 views

I am having difficulties in understanding the sentence, (Parse this sentence please.) [closed]

Nothing worth having comes easy...
Sam's user avatar
  • 1,925
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Can a "because" clause, or any clause, be the subject of a sentence?

(Just) because I am free doesn't mean I want to do homework. I made this sentence and it sound right to me; adding “just” makes me feel more certain. However, I can't parse it. I thought "...
joy2020's user avatar
  • 1,056
0 votes
2 answers
94 views

methods of parsing passive voice

The show was watched by five million people. Am I right there are two approaches to parsing this sentence?: first approach: "Was watched" is a verb. The verb "was watched" is ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

parsing "She wasn't at her best, it has to be said."

A sentence from "extra examples" of item 4 on oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) She wasn't at her best, it has to be said. I would like to parse this sentence. Is "it" a personal ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
1 vote
2 answers
77 views

Can I use "parse" and "parsing" as nouns?

Can I use the word "parse" (any type of analysis in linguistics) as a noun? For example: a morphological parse a phonetic parse a sentence parse a word parse a text parse (1) We need to do ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

parse of "stopped"

Where are you? (on the phone) (1) I'm stopped by police. (2) I'm stopped at a red light. (1): "Am stopped" is a verb. "Stopped" is a past participle. (2): "Am" is a verb. ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is "life is too short to count calories" grammatically wrong?

I am too tired to talk. I am the actual agent of the action "talk". Life is too short to count calories. However, life is not the actual agent of the action "count". I think it ...
joy2020's user avatar
  • 1,056
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

That's what I take it to mean

A: Does it mean ... ? B: Yes. That's what I take it to mean. I can't understand at all the way the sentence "That's what I take it to mean" is made up. Is "that" the object of &...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

"I read <more> books <more> than magazines." — parsing

(1a) I read books more than magazines. — correct "More" in (1a) modifies "read". (1b) I read books more than I do/did magazines. — correct Since (1b) exists, then "than" ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

Is an adverb fit for this sentence/phrase?

In the NY Times headline: "The Fight to Save New York’s Extravagantly ’80s Subway Entrance" is the adverb Extravagantly a correct use there? shouldn't it be Extravagant instead?
guerdoo sinfu's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

"Go" a punctual verb?

Is the word "to go" a punctual verb? I don't think so because we can say: It took him five days to go to xxx. But why we can't say: I have been going to New York for five days ( ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,677
0 votes
1 answer
16 views

Understanding descriptions from novel

From the beginning of House of Suns by Alastair Reynolds Chimneys and turrets, belvederes and clock towers punctuated the haphazard, dinosaur-backed roofline. Some parts of the house were only one or ...
Jimmy Yang's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

Is "worsening" an adjective in this ocntext? [closed]

The headline in NY times is: "Why Climate Change Makes It Harder to Fight Fire With Fire Worsening wildfires have led officials to embrace planned fires to thin forests ahead of disaster. But the ...
ilma pav's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

What is "Them" related to in this text?

in the NY times headline I found this: "Traffic deaths in New York City have risen to the highest level in eight years. A new campaign aims to shock them into slowing down." what is "...
guerdoo sinfu's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
88 views

'He walked off embarrassed and sad'

He walked off embarrassed and sad. (I can't remember where I found this sentence as I then just noted it without citing the source to ask later). 'Embarrassed' and 'sad' are functioning as Subjective ...
RADS's user avatar
  • 519
4 votes
1 answer
175 views

How to use a gerund+infinitive structure like "trying to win"

While reading a book, I met a sentence with a curious grammar construction which got me utterly confused. Here it is : There is a curious corollary to the principle of trying to win the big pots ...
Makhmud's user avatar
  • 49
0 votes
2 answers
84 views

Function of "as" in "Something is as what we would like it to be"

Today I've come across an English sentence that is "Something is as we would like it to be." According to English grammar and the context, I think "as" there can only be an adverb ...
Ng.'s user avatar
  • 387
9 votes
7 answers
4k views

In the sentence "The table was set for lunch" is "set" a verb or an adjective?

The table was set for lunch I want to see if this is a passive sentence. I think if the word "set" is a verb it is passive, but if “set” is an adjective it would be an active one.
Dan's user avatar
  • 89
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

phrases that work as verb or verbal phrases working as adjective?

In the example: 1 - "The most beautiful and perfect experiences of my life all happened when I was trippin' balls." I belive "trippin' balls" is a reference to some thing being ...
Dagaggio lera's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
81 views

What does "in abundance" modify in "These dogs have silliness in abundance"?

These dogs have silliness in abundance. What does "in abundance" modify? Is it "have" or "silliness" Someone told me that it modifies a noun, but I don't agree. Is there ...
bak1936's user avatar
  • 464
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Are "open" and "empty" adverbs in "The food bins are broken open and empty."?

The food bins are broken open and empty. The words "open" and "empty" in the above mentioned sentence seem like adjectives, but in another sense they modify the verb "broken&...
Abid's user avatar
  • 415
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Syntax.Analysis of the sentence

She didn’t want to hear that this was the platform he usually sat on to wait for the cheaper train, she didn’t want to become part of his ri-diculous pattern of commuting from this new home to get ...
StudentStudent's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

Syntactic analysis of the sentence

He lay still for a long time in the foreign softness of the bed, unable to figure out where he was. Can you help me with this sentence? I understand that still is certainly an adverb, but is ' for a ...
StudentStudent's user avatar

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