Questions tagged [participle-clauses]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why ", removing ..." is better than ", which removes ..." in this case?

I just got a suggestion from Grammarly that I don't understand. This is my original sentence: As a result, type MyEnum is composed of literal string types, which removes the need for import just for ...
Rain's user avatar
  • 1,023
5 votes
3 answers
172 views

How do we determine which person the participle clause is talking about?

I caught him while investigating. (here the investigator is me) I caught him while playing video games. (here it was him who was playing video games.)However, It could mean you were playing video ...
hwkal's user avatar
  • 473
2 votes
2 answers
80 views

What is the subject of the “sizzled”?

I don’t understand what is happening to the following sentence, especially “ that sizzled for a split second” I read this on Kimutatu Tokyo university English reading (キムタツ東大英語リーディング), an English ...
RIN's user avatar
  • 43
1 vote
2 answers
409 views

Having involved and Having been involved

Why does the following sentence need a passive participle (having been involved)? He has worked in different Southern cities and some years in Europe, and considers himself semi-retired, having ...
brp7's user avatar
  • 122
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Participle or gerund clause

I came across the following sentence and I am not sure about the grammatical function of "winning the prize". Is this a participle clause? There is little likelihood of Boris winning the ...
lordkain's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
153 views

'Having been released in ...' or 'Released in ...'? Is the Perfect Participle Necessary?

Admittedly, there are a few questions similar to this, but I find that the examples are usually compromised by other errors. In these two examples (below), which use participle clauses as supplements, ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 247
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

“covering an area of 6000 square metres.”

I came across this introductory text of the Terracotta Army and found the bold part a bit weird, can you use the participle “covering” that way? It reads better, to me, if I rephrase it to “This pit, ...
Angyang's user avatar
  • 524
0 votes
3 answers
59 views

He felt sick and threw up a lot because drinking too much one day before. - correct use of a participle phrase?

Example 1 Because drinking too much one day before, he felt sick and threw up a lot. Example 2 He felt sick and threw up a lot because drinking too much one day before. I know Example 1 is a ...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,235
0 votes
0 answers
65 views

Differences in structure between an participle phrase and an participle clause

Removing his pants, Ron jumped into the water to save the child. Walking down the street, I ran into an old friend. Packing his baggage, he left his home and proceeded to cut all his ties with his ...
hamidkhal300's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
179 views

What does this past participle attribute refer to?

An excerpt from this article: Such solutions all take quantum states to be objective properties of the physical system they describe and not as catalogs of personal judgments about those physical ...
xiaohuamao's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
44 views

Participle clauses with different subjects

I saw other phrases like Tom doing the homework, Jane cleaned her room. But I'm not sure with this sentence: He doing the homework, Jane cleaned her room. Is it possible to have pronoun in subject ...
bigeyechild's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Three questions on "In full glory reflected now shines in the stream"

2nd stanza of "The Star-Spangled Banner": On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
  • 1,053
0 votes
2 answers
29 views

Can someone help analyze the structure of the second clause?

Below is the example: Wind will power the tower’s motion, making it the first self-powered skyscraper in history. Since participial clauses share the same subject. Is "wind" the subject ...
feiniao's user avatar
  • 13
-1 votes
1 answer
36 views

Japan vs the percentage in Japan [closed]

Since what hovers is the percentage and not the country, I wonder if I have to start the second clause with "the percentage" and not "Japan". Hovering between 3% and 7%, Japan has ...
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

participial clause: hitting Mary on the head [closed]

It's generally known that a "having + past participle" clause can indicate an event that takes place before the one described by the main clause. There are, however, "Ving" forms ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
1 vote
2 answers
58 views

What is the implied subject of "accounting"?

I dreamed up these two sentences. I did some research. It seems that they are both correct. I understand that,in Sentence 1, the implied subject of "accounting" is the subject of the first ...
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

What are the grammar rules that support using participle clauses in this way (that is, the way they were used in the sentences below)?

The North West of England has seen the greatest percentage increase in first-time buyer prices, rising by 35% (£43,812) over five years to 2021. Source: independent.co.uk Local fixed line calls were ...
onose shaibu's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Is it a participle or a gerund?

I made two sentences with a word I intended to use as a gerund. But I noticed that it seems like a participle, too. Can the word "having" I wrote below have the both roles? There are some ...
Nigutumok's user avatar
  • 556
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Participles Functioning as Adverbials

I've read that 'participles functioning as adverbials' can be usefully viewed as reduced forms of adverb clauses. My question is can all participles functioning as adverbials be reconstituted into ...
Brooh's user avatar
  • 113
2 votes
2 answers
318 views

Isn't it supposed to be 'it' instead of 'its'?

This is a paragraph from the book 'Less is More: How Degrowth Will Save the World' by Jason Hickel. I am not quite sure whether its having fallen is grammatically correct. If I were to use such ...
Eren Yucel's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
195 views

Use of "Having + v3"

"Having played cricket for two years, I am a very good batsman" Is this sentence correct? Can I use It has been with "having"? Like: " It has been 2 years having played ...
Abdullah al Mamun's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
48 views

until [it had] risen

Could "subject + had" sequence be omitted in the following? If it's possible only in b, why can't the same happen to a? a. The soldiers remained in the room until they had witnessed the ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

What are complete sentences of elliptic phrases such as "Or being lied about..."?

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise: Is the following their ...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
1k views

What's the difference between "people involved" and "involved people"?

I learned at school to put an adjective clause in front of the noun when it consists of only one word and to put it after the noun when it consists of more than one word. However, I sometimes find a ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,468
1 vote
2 answers
101 views

Is "One of them being tourist attractions" a complete sentence?

What the title says. Consider this example: "There are a lot to visit when going sightseeing. One of them being tourist attractions." Is "One of them being tourist attractions." a ...
lil' barbussy's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
713 views

Can we use participle clauses as adverbial modifiers?

Most of the time, participle clauses are used in sentences like the ones that I have written below (all of which feature present participles): [1] Walking the dog, she breathed the fresh air. [2] He ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 247
4 votes
3 answers
2k views

and fixed himself a cup of coffee = fixing himself a cup of coffee?

Can "and fixed" be changed into "fixing" in the following sentence? If not, why? John got up at 7:30 and fixed himself a cup of coffee. John got up at 7:30, fixing himself a cup ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

participial construction: heading to Germany

Can the following sentence be naturally rewritten as one containing a participial construction? a. Those refugees were driven out of their country and headed / and were heading to Germany. b. Those ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

participial construction: the driver dying instantly

Is the boldfaced participial construction used properly? If not, why? The car crashed into the building, the driver dying instantly.
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

After / when scolded

Are the following sentences both okay? Or should "being" be inserted? After scolded by her teacher, she ran crying all the way home. When scolded by her teacher, she ran crying all the way ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

while Sarah running her own business

In the following sentence, can the second "dreams of" be omitted? Laura dreams of becoming a chef, while Sarah dreams of running her own business.
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
2 answers
81 views

Is 'watching him' a gerund clause in this example?

He saw James watching him. Recently, I have become familiar with non-finite clauses. This has led me to question the function of the ing- clause in constructions like the one above. Prior to learning ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 247
0 votes
1 answer
121 views

Why are non-finite verb phrases defined as non-finite clauses?

Before this question is marked as a duplicate, understand that I am not questioning the classification of a non-finite clause nor asking the generic reason for said classification. I know that the ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 247
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

"The prices of medical supplies got higher, leading to more COVID cases."

Can a whole sentence work as a subject of present participle clause? Can I write like this (is this grammatically correct)? The prices of medical supplies got higher, leading to more COVID cases. (...
Oden-kun's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
58 views

Present simple with "that" vs. a participle

I know the subordinate conjunction that is often omitted. Here are two sentences: Select the course containing the exercises you want to repeat. Select the course contains the exercises you want to ...
user90726's user avatar
  • 693
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

how to use participles as adverbials

Would you please tell me whether the use of the participle clause is correct in the following sentence: Our young children are fascinated with the old-day musicians, TV shows and the life before they ...
f6pafd's user avatar
  • 345
-2 votes
1 answer
124 views

Participle phrase or participle clause?

In the following sentence, I want to know what the bold part refers to. Is it a participle phrase or participle clause? And the reason behind it. Being the earliest well-known example of a financial ...
Maverick's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

grammatical role of "using piano keys"

You just heard "Ebony and Ivory" by Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder. This is a song about racial harmony using piano keys. The black keys on the piano are ebony, and the white ones are ...
Mcreaper's user avatar
  • 125
0 votes
1 answer
233 views

Is it being faced, faced, or having been faced with the increasing unemployment?

In writing the following sentence, I am hesitating which one (Being faced, faced, having been faced) I should use at the beginning: _____ with the increasing unemployment, many people went on strike ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
268 views

"There is somebody" + verbing or + to verb?

I looked up "there is somebody" in Corpus and found two sentences In short, unless there is somebody willing to take the risk of speaking up for it.... there is somebody to protect the ...
Elizabeth's user avatar
  • 634
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

the group set out for Athy having had an enjoyable, interesting and fun weekend

However, on landing all was well and the group set out for Athy having had an enjoyable, interesting and fun weekend. https://www.lexico.com/definition/fun This sentence is an example listed as one ...
Mcreaper's user avatar
  • 125
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Never having p.p. vs. Having never p.p.?

Recently I have encountered 'Having not p.p.', which puts not between having and p.p. In fact, I was taught to put not before having p.p. And BBC Learning English confirms it. Which is the definite ...
user121695's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
57 views

"exceeding France’s rate in 2009 and reaching almost 60% in the end of period." Why not "exceeded" and "reached"?

In this sentence why the ing form of the verb is used instead of past tense? Germany’s rate increased sharply throughout the period, exceeding France’s rate in 2009 and reaching almost 60% in the end ...
Question's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Can we transform clauses to participle clauses when they appear in question-form sentences?

We know the clauses in bold (01 and 02) can be reduced to participle clauses because the subjects of the subordinate clauses are the same as those of the main clauses: 01 We saw lots of lanterns when ...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,235
1 vote
2 answers
64 views

The subject of "lacking accounts by conquered people..."

However, lacking accounts by conquered people about their interactions with the Incas, it is unknown how much of the information of the Inca conquest as related by the ruling class is factual.(From ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

"largely transshipping goods produced elsewhere"--participle clause or shortened relative clause?

A century ago, Carribean, Chinese, and African ports were open for trade and served as flourishing entrepôts, largely transshipping goods produced elsewhere. ( From https://eml.berkeley.edu/~eichengr/...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

have editorialized, criticizing... / have editorialized and criticized

Other papers have editorialized, criticizing the government for its inflexibility. This is an example of the word editorialize found in Collins English Dictionary. I would like to know if there's any ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 55
0 votes
2 answers
209 views

Is "using" a Gerund or participle?

The house was built using cardboard. Is "using cardboard" a participle phrase or gerund? If it is a participle, what's its subject? If it is a gerund which word it is modifying?
Kukukk's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

Is the usage of the participle clause correct, here?

I read in Advanced Grammer In Use that sometimes the participle clause has its own subject, like: The collection of vases is priceless, some being over two thousand years old. According to the above ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Which one is used in the sentence? parallelism or participle cluse

A good Captain needs to be steadfast, continuing to hold the wheel and stay the course even during the most violent storm. I faced with the above sentence at an App, but I think the parallelism ...
user avatar