Questions tagged [participles]

For questions about the form of a verb that usually ends in "ed" or "ing" and is used as an adjective.

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Unfortunately, setting only big goals can feel overwhelming / overwhelmed

Unfortunately, setting only big goals can feel [overwhelmed / overwhelming] because they often take a lot more time and energy than smaller goals. Why is 'overwhelmed' wrong? We can feel overwhelmed ...
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Does this form of participle work well?

I wonder if this form of the participle can be used, here are two examples. Being sold well by the car dealer, the cars are going to be sold out soon. Being cooked in the right manner, this dish is ...
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Should I use possessive + gerund structure or reduced participal clause?

I haven't seen a perfect participle in a reduced form (I know some aren't keen on using this) so often (eg: a house having burnt). Is it still okay to use it as in the first sentence below, or does ...
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Noun + Participle

I believe that the participle in the following phrase refers to the second noun (rubbish): ...possible sites with submerged rubbish But I have some doubts. Could "submerged rubbish" be a ...
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What is the function of 'having seen' in this sentence?

I am reading my text Why Do Friendships End? by Allison Hunter, there is a sentence confused me. She referred to having seen the question in one of my articles, Mystery of Friendship. I don't know ...
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Participle Clause - Adjectival or Adverbial

It is hard for me to parse the participle clause in the following sentence and to know whether it is an adjectival or adverbial clause. "Notices were placed in the press all over the United ...
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Are they all idiomatic: "French invasion of England" vs "France's invasion of England" vs "France's invading England" vs"France invading England"

Verbals such as "Someone's doing something" or "Someone doing something" are common. But when it comes to verbals in long structures, it gets confusing. Here are some sample ...
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What are complete sentences of elliptic phrases such as "Or being lied about..."?

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise: Is the following their ...
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''comma+ with+ noun phrase'' tense confusion

The problem here is the second part after the comma, The cigarette had drawn fire from critics ever since its popular introduction in the nineteenth century, with many of those opposed to smoking ...
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What's the difference between "people involved" and "involved people"?

I learned at school to put an adjective clause in front of the noun when it consists of only one word and to put it after the noun when it consists of more than one word. However, I sometimes find a ...
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An interesting teacher VS an interested student [duplicate]

We know an adjective ending in either -ing or -ed can modify a noun. What is the difference between these two pairs? An interesting teacher An interested student A heartbroken mother ( A ...
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How to use participles in front of a noun with object for the participle?

I know that a participle following a noun can have an object. As like, The boy throwing a ball Mother goose followed by the baby gooses However, how can we use participles in front of the noun with ...
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feel the floor shaken

Is "shaken" used properly in the following? Normally, I'd expect "shaking." But I'm wondering if the verb "shake" can take an object followed by a past participle. Joe ...
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subject agreement in participle clauses

consider this sentence: I totally agree with the concept of schooling the offenders while serving time in prison we do know that clauses with prepositions (after, by, ...) + ing and conjunctions(...
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Difference between past participle and passive present participle

I want ask you about the the difference between present participle passive (being +pp) and past participle. The use of these participles really confuses me. Examples with being + pp: Being warned ...
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What does the participle phrase describe in this sentence?

I'm trying to describe an event that led someone to think he has been burglarized. When he came home, the furniture was moved and the window was slightly open, letting in a draft. My question is, ...
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The question is about the use of correct participle(s) in a sentence

Original sentence: 1) “Only a small percentage of immigrants arriving in the US ever returned to their native countries.” Now, if I like to re-construct the original sentence, which [participle clause(...
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Why doesn't this sound right?

All of these sound right: I found her dressed on the ground. I found her lying on the ground. I found her knocked out on the ground. I found her dead. But this sounds wrong. I found her fallen ...
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"Many of them his friends" or "many of them being his friends"

Someone threw a birthday party with several dozen guests before. When you are describing the guests, I think you can use these sentences: Dozens of people came to his birthday party. Many of them ...
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"Frightening" - participle?

In this sentence, what part of speech is 'frightening': "Halloween can also be frightening for pets." Is it a participle? Or is it acting as a verb?
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Using participles to short long sentences

I am confused about using participles to shorten long sentences. There's a situation where I tried to study but after an hour I found myself getting nowhere as I didn't even read a single paragraph. ...
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Can a present participle function adverbially?

She hit the ground running. He went flying. In these two examples, the present participles 'running' and 'flying' are clearly modifying their respective verbs. 'Running' complements 'hit', and '...
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"Slipping and falling" or "slipping, falling"

When you are describing a child who saw something scary outside and ran home, which sentence can you use? The child almost fell after slipping on wet grass. He ran home, once slipping on wet grass ...
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The verb appear with a participle

I want to learn how easy the verb APPEAR lends itself to the usage of itself with a participle. For example, His speech appeared worrying. What you wrote at first appeared worrying—but it probably ...
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What part of speech is "doing" in "...worked his whole life doing a job..."?

His father said he had worked his whole life doing a job he didn't really enjoy. is the word "doing" a gerund? if yes/no could someone please explain more.
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Are these sentences correct: Having illness, I've to go to the hospital every week. Having fair skin, I've to stay away from the sun

I learned that present participles can be used to express why something happens, example: Being a man, I shave everyday. However, I noticed that in describing physical features it's better to avoid ...
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Present participle vs Past participle rules

Mark, dressed in black, walked across the room. Mark, dressing in black, walked across the room. I think both sentences are correct but what's the difference in meaning between both of them? Also, is ...
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Is there any difference between past participles and past participle adjectives

My grammar book says We can also use much or very much before a past participle which is part of a passive. Ex) The new by-pass was (very) much needed. We don't use much but can use very much ...
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How does this participle modify "assumptions"?

In this sentence, Do this participle (from "made by ~above") modify (or qualify?) both "assumptions"? Many people may have sympathy for some assumptions, but reject others made by ...
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Gerunds and Participles in compound Adjective

'English-speaking countries' 'Time-saving gadgets' 'Mouth-watering food' 'Good-looking girl' English-speaking, time-saving, mouth-watering and good-looking are adjectives here. But how are these ...
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What is the grammatical function of "Emerging as it does..."

Emerging as it does from a basis of truth, it is bound to... What is the function of the bonded part in the sentence above? Is it a participle phrase?
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Reduced relative clauses referring to a whole sentence

1a- The station chief was fired, meaning there is an open position. 2a- We argued over something meaningless, making me feel bad. 3a- Dr. Gregory House is often brooding, ill-humored, and pessimistic, ...
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When can ı use -ing as participle or reduced relative clause?

As reduced relative clause: In fact, there is evidence suggesting that lower amounts are indeed efficacious. As (present) participle: In fact, there is suggesting evidence that lower amounts are ...
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His doing or him doing

Can I use "his" instead of "him" in this sentence? "Can Tom play the piano? I have never heard him playing." The sentence is from "English Grammar in Use" by ...
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Placement of Modifiers

He left the unfinished work. He left the work unfinished. Other examples can be(in present participle) He left the crying child. He left the child crying. What is the difference between 1 and 2 ...
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grammatical role of "using piano keys"

You just heard "Ebony and Ivory" by Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder. This is a song about racial harmony using piano keys. The black keys on the piano are ebony, and the white ones are ...
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English grammer-Participle [duplicate]

I would be pleased if someone could explain to me the participle in this sentence : James has made a breakthrough in his math this year, doing excellent work in comparison with last year
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'Being' a gerund 'being' a participle

I really get confused about when being used as a gerund and when is it used as a participle? I being angry is not a good thing. My being angry is not a good thing. Me being angry is not a good ...
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I can imagine him (being??) really angry

You could imagine sentence (a) (being??) uttered by someone consulting their diary and seeing that tomorrow's page is blank. I can imagine him (being??) really angry. I can't imagine elephants (...
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Why is "escaping" a participle here?

The Cambridge Dictionary says: In English, many past and present participles of verbs can be used as adjectives. Some of these examples may show the adjective use. So there is no escaping from it: ...
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to see "accomplished" or to see "being accomplished"?

The goal, which they are unlikely to live to see ____, is to “cure, prevent or manage all diseases” in the next 80 years or so. Which one is better for to fit the sentence, accomplished or being ...
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Why is there no "be" in the continuous clause?

I started reading literature in English and often see sentences where ing-verb is without be. I met a sentence: Stark's bodyguard spearheading the thing... Can you tell me why there is no is here? ...
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Paraphrasing "Peter was abandoned by his parents at an early age and took to stealing." to participles

From my homework about participles, I have to paraphrase this to participles but I don't know how to. Peter was abandoned by his parents at an early age and took to stealing.
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Is "Constantly interrupting, I was irritated by Bill." a dangling participle?

I came across this sentence on The Purdue Writing Lab: I was irritated by Bill, constantly interrupting. Further, it was mentioned that interrupting there is a participle. So far so good. However, ...
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Which paraphrase is correct?

Being about the same size as a domestic chicken, the kiwi bird lays eggs that are very large in proportion to its body size. A) The eggs of the kiwi bird are much larger than those of a domestic ...
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Why “dressed in blue” instead of “dressing in blue”?

The girl dressed in blue is my girlfriend. The girl dressing in blue is my girlfriend. I know the first sentence is correct, but how about the second one? Why do we say "The girl who dresses in ...
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Is ‘broken glass’ ambiguous?

Can ‘Broken glass’ mean: Glass was broken but it’s fixed after then. Glass was broken but it’s not fixed after then. If so, how can I express sentence 2 in a way easy to understand?
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Can participles be used like this?

There are many glasses which were not made from broken glass. They are just made this way. Can I call them 'broken glass'? If not, should I just say 'glasses'?
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Participle as Adverb

Is it possible (and common) to use a participle as an adverb? Examples: The damp walls looming overgrown and ruggedly out of the water bear witness to ancient grandeur. (In this case, the adverb ...
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1 vote
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'Sitting' and 'Standing' are participles?

He is standing there. He is sitting on the chair. 'Sitting' and 'standing' are present Participles working here as an adjective? And are they subjective complement?
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