Skip to main content

Questions tagged [participles]

For questions about the form of a verb that usually ends in "ed" or "ing" and is used as an adjective.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
2 answers
24 views

making otoscopic examination?

I came across a cause and effect sentence like this. Some children have been reported to have narrow external ear canals, making otoscopic examination difficult and perhaps predisposing to stenosis. ...
emilywenly's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Have + object + Bare Inf

I have a question about the difference between My boss had me work hard. and My boss had me working hard. Some linguists I talked to previously said that they both mean almost the same, but the ...
Me_and_Michael's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
32 views

leaving and causing referring?

In tinea capitis the fungus invades the hair shafts, causing the hairs to become brittle and to break off at the level of the scalp, leaving an area of stubby, black dotted alopecia. Hello, is the “...
emilywenly's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

wearing a beautiful wedding gown

a. I kissed the bride, in her wedding gown. b. I kissed her, in her wedding gown. c. I kissed the bride, wearing a beautiful wedding gown. d. I kissed her, wearing a beautiful wedding gown. Which ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,971
1 vote
0 answers
19 views

carrying participle?

There's a subject that's been on my mind a lot lately. Are the participles in these sentences in adverb manner? What difference does it make if we put a comma before participles? They sat at the back ...
emilywenly's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
45 views

He had problems reading without glasses. In the above sentence is 'reading' a present participle or a gerund in this sentence

He had problems reading without glasses. In the above sentence is 'reading' a present participle or a gerund in this sentence.can anyone explain, please 🙏
Erica Gogoi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

"..., with aftershocks continued..."

This is from a news article. Strong shaking was felt in Taipei, the capital, some 100 miles away, with aftershocks continued for roughly two hours. Automatic substitution in Google Docs suggests &...
qna's user avatar
  • 447
6 votes
2 answers
225 views

Possessive pronouns before gerunds

I do not like his working late. I do not like him working late. Here, working is considered a gerund and it is suggested to use a possesive case instead of an objective case. My question is that both ...
Tamil's user avatar
  • 61
2 votes
1 answer
118 views

What are the difference between these two sentences?

The bullied schoolboy appeared on television, and The bullying schoolboy appeared on television. What is the difference in meaning. Is it that the 1st sentence subject is the victim?
maisa Lk's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
370 views

Rules for Joining by Past Participle [closed]

The sentences below have different subjects. I saw a child. He was burnt. But we can join/add them using a past participle, and write- I saw a burnt child. I have not been able to find any rule ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 119
1 vote
2 answers
416 views

Having involved and Having been involved

Why does the following sentence need a passive participle (having been involved)? He has worked in different Southern cities and some years in Europe, and considers himself semi-retired, having ...
BumbleBee's user avatar
  • 167
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

“covering an area of 6000 square metres.”

I came across this introductory text of the Terracotta Army and found the bold part a bit weird, can you use the participle “covering” that way? It reads better, to me, if I rephrase it to “This pit, ...
Angyang's user avatar
  • 524
-1 votes
2 answers
74 views

What parts of speech are the verbs "[She] was lying …, listening to … reading a story" and their function? [closed]

Allice was lying under a tree listening to his sister reading a story. What is the parts of speech of lying, listening and reading and their function?
Subhash Mahto's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
85 views

Correct way of describing a certain trend

Is this a correct and natural way of describing this trend? Having increased until about March, the figure dropped to 0 by June. I highlighted the part that confuses me.
AES's user avatar
  • 27
3 votes
1 answer
67 views

Difference between Perfect and Present relative time reference with the past participle form

1.They filmed the thief. (past tense--finite) 2.They saw the thief filmed in the act. (past participle--non finite) Does "filmed" in the second sentence have a past or a present meaning ...
user57928's user avatar
  • 157
7 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why was 'Having seen that it is about to rain...' not the correct answer?

In the example sentence, I initially interpreted the sentence structure as 'We have seen that is about to rain.' However, the correct answer was 'seeing,' with the appropriate context being 'We see ...
Han's user avatar
  • 159
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

"A myth come true." Is the base form of "come" legitimate?

source: When selected Cyclops, ready for your orders. I see it all. Awaiting orders. A myth come true. Always on standby. Yes, commander? (https://moapyr.fandom.com/wiki/Cyclops_Walker/Quotes) ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
  • 1,073
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Temporal interpretation of -ing clause

Eating a hearty breakfast, we prepared for our long journey. I think this sentence alone can mean: Eating is part of the preparation Eating precedes the preparation (after eating we prepared). What ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,677
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

What is the subject of this participle in this context?

What is the subject of paving? 'Adidas?' or 'a landmark deal with Adidas?' I thought 'a landmark deal with Adidas', however, one of my friends told that 'Adidas' is the subject. I want to know how to ...
Japanese English teacher's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

past participle VERSUS perfect participle

1 Having been sent on a business trip, he did not see Jane for three months. 2 Sent on a business trip, he did not see Jane for three months. I can't put my finger on the difference. What is it?
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,468
-6 votes
1 answer
82 views

a washing man/clothes - what's the meaning? [duplicate]

There are washing clothes in the tub. - MEANS - There are clothes being washed in the tub. There is a washing man in the tub. - CAN IT MEAN - There is a man being washed in the tub.
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,468
3 votes
2 answers
328 views

A reading man/a man reading

1 I saw a reading man in the room. 2 I saw a man reading in the room. How do they differ? Does the first one mean that the person seen is always reading and the second means that the man was reading ...
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,468
3 votes
2 answers
526 views

Does "People should be concerned about…" contain the passive voice?

In a recent ESL test, the question was whether the following sentence contained the passive voice: People should be concerned about how to find alternatives to fossil fuels. The answer book says yes, ...
Vincent Loh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Should have been used 'preposition' in following sentence

"Any citizen of India of full age and capacity can make a declaration renouncing his citizenship." This is a sentence from my polity book. In the above sentence, should we use "of" ...
Ansh's user avatar
  • 91
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

Should " beginning" be followed by "with"?

In unit 80 of 'Advanced Grammar in Use', it says In formal English we can also introduce a reason in a clause beginning for, in that, or less commonly, inasmuch as. Shouldn't there be a preposition ...
curious333's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
203 views

Resist < inclusion vs being included>

This is not because such an interpretation necessarily stiffens into a thesis (although rigidity in any interpretation of this or of any novel is always a danger), but because Wuthering Heights has ...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,677
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

needing/needed - what's the difference?

1 We have some laptops needing to be fixed. 2 We have some laptops needed to be fixed. I was told that 1 means that the laptops are still in need for a fix. 2 means that the need to fix them was in ...
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,468
1 vote
1 answer
33 views

Very confusing adjective in two forms: -ing and -ed

6. The witnesses gave __ conflicted __ reports of what happened during the robbery. The answer key says the right answer is “conflicting reports”. I agree that it’s easier to read or distinguish from ...
Vida's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
2 answers
24 views

Participles at the beginning of a sentence used adjectivally

Would the adjectival use of the participle ENGAGED in the subordinate clause be correct to describe the students in the MAIN clause? Engaged in a broad spectrum of speaking and listening activities ...
Lena's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
2 answers
116 views

When do you put a participle after a noun? [duplicate]

In Seattle, Washington, high schooler Light Turner stumbles across the "Death Note," a mysterious leather-bound notebook with instructions that state that by writing a person's name down ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,488
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

About the participle of Absolute construction

Is there any difference in meaning between these two sentences? My car breaking down, I had to take a taxi to work. My car having broken down, I had to take a taxi to work.
user421993's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

Adverbial participle clause or gerund

Often times I don't have any problem with interpreting or speaking but I do wonder about the function of this reduction. The example sentence is as follows; You can have all the beer you want then, ...
Ozzy's user avatar
  • 35
0 votes
1 answer
52 views

Dangling phrases

Ive found a dangling phrases While walking across the street, the bus hit her. "While walking across the street" describes clearly the bus in that case making no sense. But if I change it ...
Hans Mustermann's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
53 views

Relative clause and participle

I've never heard the following participial phrase, and it sounds unnatural to me: Instead of "There is no way that you are so tall." one would write "There is no way you being so ...
Hans Mustermann's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
429 views

"She came to the city fleeing persecution in her home town."

I saw an interesting sentence due to play game; She came to the city fleeing persecution in her home town. If talking about only meaning, I understand the sentence. She ran away to the city for ...
stackedbook's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Why did we use participle here to describe action

A student disrespecting his teacher hurts us. What is the meaning of the sentence? Is it 'the act of disrespecting teachers by a student hurts us? Now my question is how is the sentence formed? Why ...
Sahil Laskar's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
66 views

She came in , followed by a valet, carrying on his arm a big fur coat [closed]

Read the following She entered, followed by a valet, carrying on his arm a big fur coat The first comma is needed because there's a participle after it, but i don't get why the second comma was used. ...
Rav Rk's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
70 views

Unfortunately, setting only big goals can feel overwhelming / overwhelmed

Unfortunately, setting only big goals can feel [overwhelmed / overwhelming] because they often take a lot more time and energy than smaller goals. Why is 'overwhelmed' wrong? We can feel overwhelmed ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,416
0 votes
1 answer
17 views

Does this form of participle work well?

I wonder if this form of the participle can be used, here are two examples. Being sold well by the car dealer, the cars are going to be sold out soon. Being cooked in the right manner, this dish is ...
user1425's user avatar
  • 4,468
1 vote
2 answers
67 views

Should I use possessive + gerund structure or reduced participial clause?

I haven't seen a perfect participle in a reduced form (I know some aren't keen on using this) so often (eg: a house having burnt). Is it still okay to use it as in the first sentence below, or does ...
Eren Yucel's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
79 views

Noun + Participle

I believe that the participle in the following phrase refers to the second noun (rubbish): ...possible sites with submerged rubbish But I have some doubts. Could "submerged rubbish" be a ...
Iolanta Fialka's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
269 views

What is the function of 'having seen' in this sentence?

I am reading my text Why Do Friendships End? by Allison Hunter, there is a sentence confused me. She referred to having seen the question in one of my articles, Mystery of Friendship. I don't know ...
Beau Garçon Idol Lucianus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
74 views

Participle Clause - Adjectival or Adverbial

It is hard for me to parse the participle clause in the following sentence and to know whether it is an adjectival or adverbial clause. "Notices were placed in the press all over the United ...
mahmud k pukayoor's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Are they all idiomatic: "French invasion of England" vs "France's invasion of England" vs "France's invading England" vs"France invading England"

Verbals such as "Someone's doing something" or "Someone doing something" are common. But when it comes to verbals in long structures, it gets confusing. Here are some sample ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

What are complete sentences of elliptic phrases such as "Or being lied about..."?

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated, don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise: Is the following their ...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

''comma+ with+ noun phrase'' tense confusion

The problem here is the second part after the comma, The cigarette had drawn fire from critics ever since its popular introduction in the nineteenth century, with many of those opposed to smoking ...
Eren Yucel's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
1k views

What's the difference between "people involved" and "involved people"?

I learned at school to put an adjective clause in front of the noun when it consists of only one word and to put it after the noun when it consists of more than one word. However, I sometimes find a ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,488
0 votes
2 answers
119 views

An interesting teacher VS an interested student [duplicate]

We know an adjective ending in either -ing or -ed can modify a noun. What is the difference between these two pairs? An interesting teacher An interested student A heartbroken mother ( A ...
user421993's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

How to use participles in front of a noun with object for the participle?

I know that a participle following a noun can have an object. As like, The boy throwing a ball Mother goose followed by the baby gooses However, how can we use participles in front of the noun with ...
Mint Bee's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

feel the floor shaken

Is "shaken" used properly in the following? Normally, I'd expect "shaking." But I'm wondering if the verb "shake" can take an object followed by a past participle. Joe ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 6,006

1
2 3 4 5
7