Questions tagged [participles]

For questions about the form of a verb that usually ends in "ed" or "ing" and is used as an adjective.

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Using many participle phrases in a one sentence

I am not sure we can combine sentences by using many participle phrases in one sentence. I was sitting on the bridge. The bridge was built over the river. The river flowed rapidly. ...
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160 views

look forward to meeting

“My daughter and I––and my dog, Enzo––would very much like to join you for dinner in Maranello, then.” “Your dog is named Enzo? How propitious!” “He is a race car driver at heart,” Denny ...
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'by' vs. 'when' before participles

Kitty: 'Jair surprised me by asking whether I might be interested in working with him'. (1) Kitty: 'Jair surprised me when asking whether I might be interested in working with him'. (2) Could (1) ...
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Is using both “What has just happened?” and “What has been just happened?” fine?

What has just happened? What has been just happened? The first one is right, but my friend told me that we can't use “has been [...] happened” because it has two past participles, which is ...
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2answers
510 views

Why is it vanishing instead of vanished?

The Vanishing Glass . . . . . . Dudley came waddling toward them as fast as he could. “Out of the way, you,” he said, punching Harry in the ribs. Caught by surprise, Harry fell hard on ...
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108 views

What is the subject in “While nestled inside that divine sanctuary”?

While nestled inside that divine sanctuary, words were my window to the world outside my perch in Columbus, Ohio. (Benita Porter, The Power of Words) It seems like while-clause is a participial ...
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1answer
7k views

What does this participial construction mean?

"I think I've got a good idea of what's been going on," said Professor McGonagall. "It doesn't take a genius to work it out. You fed Draco Malfoy some cock-and-bull story about a dragon, trying to ...
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160 views

such like doing? and the use of the word “earn”

A may mean an event, or an event's profit such like earn 10 dollars in one gambling game. Is there any problem in using earning? like is an prep and after the present participle? And in a gambling ...
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Noun phrase with gerund phrase? Noun phrase with participial phrase? [closed]

Does the gerund phrase belong to the noun phrase? Does the participial phrase belong to the noun phrase?
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3answers
25k views

'as compared to' vs 'as compare to'

The sentence below: Our method cannot achieve 100 percent accuracy as compared to DART method due to the imprecise modeling. Why does the sentence above use as compared to? Can we use as compare ...
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2answers
290 views

The present participle used for actions in the past

I have come across these sentences written in an English blog. The doctor, living in this house before us, moved to Australia. The doctors, attending a conference on malaria, urged governments ...
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221 views

Is this a participial construction?

Ron's eyes strayed to the pile of Chocolate Frogs waiting to be unwrapped. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) Is the highlighted part a participial construction? – its semantic subject is ...
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2answers
161 views

What is the reason that the two adjectives are placed in a row?

"Barking," said Uncle Vernon, "howling mad, the lot of them.” (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) ‘Howling’ and ‘mad’, all two are adjectives in dictionaries. What is the reason ...
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1answer
109 views

what is the meaning of the two sentences

Flowers are planted in the garden. [planted: past participle, past tense of plant] Flowers are planting in the garden. [planting: present participle of plant] What is the meaning of the above two ...
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1answer
175 views

Meanings of participles

From the book Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: "That's mine!" said Harry, trying to snatch it back. "Who'd be writing to you?" sneered Uncle Vernon, (1) shaking the letter open with one ...
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98 views

Do both of these modify the previous noun phrases?

"Yes," said Professor McGonagall. "And I don't suppose you're going to tell me why you're here, of all places?" "I've come to bring Harry to his aunt and uncle. They're the only family he has ...

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