Questions tagged [perfect-continuous]

The perfect continuous, also known as the perfect progressive, takes the form "HAVE BEEN + Present Participle." It describes an action that started in the past and has continued to occur until now.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
1 answer
169 views

How can I avoid using 2 different tenses instead of each other? [duplicate]

Background: My name is Ali. I live in IRAN and my mother tounge is Farsi. My reference book in studying grammar is English Grammar in Use written by Raymond Murphy and I am sure you are familiar with ...
2 votes
3 answers
223 views

What to use instead of Perfect Continuous in the Passive Voice?

As far as I know, Perfect Continuous tenses aren't used in the Passive Voice. What is typically used instead? What are the correct answers here? These anatomical terms … since 1970. a) are used b) ...
1 vote
1 answer
45 views

Perfect or perfect continuous?

Perfect simple and perfect continuous are sometimes confusing for learners. I know we can use "I've worked for twenty years" in place of "I've been working for twenty years". Both ...
2 votes
1 answer
347 views

"I have (or) had been studying for my exam since lunchtime and now I am watching TV"

Which sentence is grammatically correct (or maybe both) and why? I have been studying for my exam since lunchtime and now I am watching TV. or I had been studying for my exam since lunchtime and now ...
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Present Perfect Tense vs. Present Perfect Continuous Tense

I have a doubt about using Present Perfect Tense and Present Perfect Continuous Tense in the below example, Catherine works in a bank. She _______ in a bank for five years. I think the correct ...
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Future perfect continous vs Future perfect tense

What is the difference between these two sentences? My aunt will have been living in England for five years when I go there. and My aunt will have lived in England for five years when I go there.
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Continuous / Perfect (Continuous) Imperatives (with infinitive and subjunctive)

Sometimes it's necessary to use a specific aspect of tenses (simple, continuous, perfect, perfect continuous), but when we ask people to do something should (can) we use the same aspects in order to ...
0 votes
1 answer
85 views

Present perfect for actions that are still ongoing or have just finished

Can present perfect be used in the following situations? Present perfect continuous is the usual choice, but do native speakers use present perfect simple too? "It has rained for two hours" ...
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

Present Perfect vs Present Perfect continuous tense differences

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? He has been studying in the same class for the last three years. and He has studied in the same class for the last three years.
2 votes
1 answer
84 views

Confusion with the rule that describes how present perfect simple/continuous tenses are used

In the book "English Grammar in Use" (Murphy Raymond), I encountered the following example when talking about present perfect tense: John hasn't studied very well this term. and explains ...
0 votes
2 answers
205 views

What is the best choice in this case, 'has taken' vs. 'has been taking'?

Consider: Jessy has taken or has been taking driving lessons and next week she is going to take the driving test I think has been taking can make it as taking driving lessons has been an ongoing ...
3 votes
2 answers
671 views

"It {has been raining} and the streets were wet." Is the textbook wrong?

In my exercise book, I have a question as follows: It_____and the streets were wet. A. has been raining B. rains C. has rained D. would rain The answer is A and I don't know why it has to be A. I ...
0 votes
3 answers
12k views

"Have you ever worked in a ..." vs. "Have you ever been working in a ..."

Which one of these sentences is right, the perfect simple or the perfect continuous? A: Have you ever worked in a factory? B: No, never! or A: Have you ever been working in a factory? B: No,...
1 vote
1 answer
51 views

perfect continuous for a completed action

I have cleaned my car : this means I have finished cleaning my entire car and it focuses on the result = clean car I have been cleaning my car: this doesn`t necessarily mean I have finished ...
1 vote
2 answers
145 views

present perfect or present perfect continuous?

If I see a friend with a lot of shopping bags and I want to inquire in a friendly way what they have bought, should I ask: what have you bought? or what have you been buying? Are both possible without ...
3 votes
3 answers
166 views

Past perfect continuous for a non continuous action

http://www.eltbase.com/get_quiz.php?id=22 Level 3 - Narrative tenses quiz : a creepy story So who...or what...______________ around upstairs? The options are: 1) had walked 2) walked 3) had been ...
1 vote
0 answers
114 views

Present perfect vs present perfect progressive [duplicate]

We have been living in Saudi Arabia .. We have lived in Saudi Arabia ... What is the difference between them, or they are the same in meaning ? And what do you understand, when you hear ...
4 votes
1 answer
132 views

Is it possible to use progressive with an indefinite quantity like 'many'?

Imagine that I ordered a book through the net 2 months ago and so far I haven't received it yet. I have been trying to contact the seller but none of my emails has been answered. Right now I ...
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

I have been beginning

No problem when "I began to learn English in 2000". But what if "I began to learn English from 2000 till now more times without success". Verb begin something that happens in a moment, not something ...
0 votes
1 answer
8k views

Using adverbial modifiers ("the whole day" vs "for the whole day")

I found information that claims natives prefer to say "the whole day" rather than "for the whole day". Since then, I've been wondering what the situations are in which a speaker is more likely to say "...
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Interchangeability of Past Continuous or Past Simple for Present Perfect Continuous

Yesterday an American friend of mine shuttered my world by saying that these three tenses (past continuous, past simple, present perfect continuous) are interchangeable in American English. So if I ...
1 vote
1 answer
283 views

Having deal with "to get used to" and "to be used to"

I know "to get used to" means the process of accustoming whereas "to be used to" means that somebody has done it, this process is finished and now there is nothing unusual connected with this thing, ...
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Should I revise translated sentences (Present Perfect Continuos)

The first excerpt is: A man ner the window is looking at us. - Yeah, and what of it? - I've been meeting him at the library lately. In this case "lately" inmplies the process of meeting as a ...
2 votes
1 answer
67 views

Present Perfect Continuous - effect

Take the following sentence: I have been learning for two hours. Can this imply that I am not learning now? I'm tired and I want this sentence to show the effect that learning has on me. Or it is ...
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Does "she has been watching TV" imply starting in past and continuing to present?

Mom! She is not giving me remote, it has been her limit now, she has been watching TV and you are not saying anything. She has been watching TV, that's why the TV looks hot. Does my first sentence ...
0 votes
2 answers
413 views

Past perfect continuous - Positive, Negative and Question sentences

What is wrong with these sentences in past perfect continuous? If so, how should this be corrected? Both Samantha and Sarah had been waiting all day for a friend arrived. Both Samantha and Sarah had ...
0 votes
1 answer
83 views

The difference between Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous

Why do we not say: "I've gardened all day", which would be correct if we have finished gardening but we say: "I've been gardening all day"? We seem to do the same with other action words: cook, sew, ...
1 vote
1 answer
19k views

“I have been *verb*ing...”: once or many times?

There is someone who drives me crazy using the past perfect to indicate an action that was performed only once, and I understand that it indicates an action performed more than once. For example: I ...
4 votes
3 answers
2k views

"running for an hour " scenarios

I would like to ask which sentences would a native speaker use for the following scenarios : You have been running for an hour and then you bump into your friends.You both keeps on running without ...
1 vote
1 answer
977 views

Can I say "What should be doing these days?" or is that wrong?

Is this right: What should I be doing these days? The answer can be: You should be preparing for your exams these days.
6 votes
2 answers
14k views

"Have worn it" or "have been wearing it"?

Please have a look at this sentence (Viv Quarry present perfect answers) When I left school I cut my hair and have worn it short ever since. Will it be possible to use the continuous form "I have ...
3 votes
2 answers
169 views

How is this the present perfect continuous?

Pakistan has been slow to embrace the revolution that is the internet. According to present perfect continuous tense, has/have + been + istform + ing is used, but in this case slow is used. I am ...