Questions tagged [personal-pronouns]

For questions about pronouns that refer to a specific person or thing, like 'he', 'she', 'it', or 'they'.

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"The sight of her rendered him speechless." — Why place "her" after nouns? Why not say just "Her sight rendered him speechless."?

britannica.com: (1) The sight of her rendered him speechless. "Of her" looks rather strange to me. I would have expected to see something like: (2) Her sight rendered him speechless. So, why ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 answer
41 views

To whom does "her" refer in "Her relationship with then-Senator Palpatine and his successor had been calm"?

In Star Wars: Queen's Shadow, Padme, the former queen and the current senator of Naboo, has returned to her home planet after a visit to Breha. Note that Palpatine is the previous senator for Naboo, ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
72 views

'For (his) betrayal, the general was simply demoted a little in rank.' vs. 'For the general's betrayal he was simply demoted a little in rank.'

I am trying to translate a sentence into English. Here is what I have got: For the general's betrayal, he was simply demoted a little in rank. For his betrayal, the general was simply demoted a ...
Mamamia's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
367 views

Who does "she" refer to in "She wasn’t the jealous type, but she’d always been curious, and Sabé rarely did anything first."?

In Star Wars: Queen's Shadow, there is a conversation between Padmé and Sabé: “Do you like him enough?”, Padme said. “I don’t know,” Sabé said. “We’ve talked about it, so it’s not like I’m leading ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
100 views

"They had invited Tim as well as <myself> <me>". — Is "myself" correct to you here or only "me" is correct? [duplicate]

the textbook "the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language", page 1494, example 39i: (1) Both the local authority and myself have gone to the minister. — I was told here it's incorrect but ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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"Both the local authority and <myself> <me> <I> have gone to the minister." — Do all these pronouns work here?

I'd like to know what pronouns I can use inside the construction "both ... and ..." when it's used as a subject. For this purpose, I have the following example: the textbook "the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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7 votes
5 answers
2k views

"The house has a cat in it." — Why is "it" grammatical? Why is there not "itself" instead?

ell.stackexchange.com: (1) The house has a cat in it. my variant: (2) The house has a cat in itself. As far as I understand, "itself" must be correct here. But I can't understand how it is ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
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What form of the verb is used with a subject like "little me"?

I want to say that I look innocent in an old picture of mine and I don't know if I should say: "Little me looks so innocent"; or "Little me look so innocent" (without an "s&...
user180183's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Compare something with somebody

We shouldn't compare our clothes or shoes with our classmates. We shouldn't compare our clothes or shoes with those of our classmates'. (Meaning: you don't have to keep up with the Joneses ) I want ...
ForOU's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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article + personal pronoun: "After I lose some weight, I will be <a> lighter me."

wordreference.com: (1) After I lose some weight, I will be a lighter me. my variant: (2) After I lose some weight, I will be lighter me. "A" is an article, so it cannot be before a personal ...
Loviii's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
56 views

Is "author" in third person?

"The author is brilliant" - here, is "the author" in third person? Usually, he, she, and they are considerd to be third persons. Is the above considered to be in third person?
tryingtobeastoic's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
153 views

"Yourself" as a personal pronoun?

I was writing a message recently and I noticed that I had reflexively (probably trying to sound more official) written: It should be done by either Klavs or yourself. instead of It should be done ...
PawelAdamczuk's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
54 views

"It" -- a dummy subject or not?

The following are two example sentences of "versus" in the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. The first question: Is the "it" a dummy subject in both? The second question: Could ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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9 votes
8 answers
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"If you see mistakes in my text, say <it> <them> <this> <these> <that> <those> to me please."

All sentences below are mine. I think (1), (2) & (3) are correct and mean the same: (1) If you see mistakes in my text, say them to me please. — correct because "them" refers to "...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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BRING someone or BRING TO someone

Which one is more correct: They are thankful for the happiness and the joy they bring them every day OR They are thankful for the happiness and the joy they bring to them every day? Here, "...
zenith3's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
2k views

What do 'they' and 'their' refer to in this paragraph?

What does 'they' refer to in the following paragraph? You see, what we’re doing is we’re bringing up children and educating them to live the same sort of lives we’re living, in order that they may ...
Japanese English teacher's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
33 views

"Talk to them about them/themselves": pronouns bound to a pronominal object

Scholars who think about monsters have long noted that vampires and zombies reveal something to us about ourselves and about our humanity (The Washington Post). But what about a sentence like this: ...
Roger Williams's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
126 views

what is the difference between indefinite pronoun and impersonal pronoun?

what is the difference between indefinite pronoun and impersonal pronoun? indefinite pronoun ex- Somebody pushed me from behind. impersonal pronoun ex- One should always speaks truth. here somebody ...
Hadman's user avatar
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1 answer
291 views

Is it correct to answer the question “who is there?” by “I”?

Somebody on quora stated that “I.” is a possible answer to the question “Who is there?”, making “I.” the shortest English sentence whatsoever. I'm not a native speaker but wouldn't the natural answer ...
yannis's user avatar
  • 101
-1 votes
1 answer
18 views

Pronouns referring and antecedents structure confusing

Someone moved paper from a space meant for the storage of shared materials and intended to store them in a room they are solely using. I’m not sure how to fix the combination of the content for the ...
Xan's user avatar
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2 answers
29 views

Is it correct to use she in my sentence? [closed]

Another negative experience with that doctor was when she did not provide enough explanation about that investigation. Should I use "she" or another pronoun?
Costas's user avatar
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0 answers
95 views

with my/me being a

Worst of all is Waking‘s overreliance on colors for its map interface. I’m trying my best here being told to go to the exit via the magenta dots on the map. Or if I have to complete a nearby objective,...
JK2's user avatar
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0 answers
49 views

Is it correct to omit ''I'' in my sentence?

Is it correct to omit the personal pronoun? I previously activated (a substance) it but also (I) made it without activation. Sorry for the incomplete question.
Costas's user avatar
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-2 votes
2 answers
97 views

Which pronoun should I use in this sentence?

Let's say I am talking to a person named Mike about another person David. Now if I want to tell Mike to talk to David only about a issue, then should I say: Please speak to David himself about that. ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
458 views

Is there such an expression in the English Language: "In them days" [duplicate]

On a video on BBC web site, the speaker says this; In them days, that just did not happen. It struck me as soon as I heard it. And luckily there is the subtitles. It clearly says "In them days&...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Reference of "they" when repeated in a sentence

What does the second 'they' stand for from a grammar point of view? I like dogs, they like hoops, they are my friends.
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
466 views

can you put me after after a name like Tim and me? [closed]

I found something that said, "Tim and me". Are you supposed to put "me" after a name? I tried to put "I" in except it won't work.
Everett Harvin's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
152 views

Is it okay to ommit personal pronouns in such situations?

I'm wondering if it's considered casual and natural to start sentences without the pronoun, or if a native English speaker would find that odd and feel that I'm either being way too casual or that I'm ...
Vendrameto's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Is 'the same (thing) as (possessive pronoun)...' grammatically acceptable?

Swan's book explains: In short answers we use me, him, etc. (informal) or I, he, etc. with a verb (more formal). The same thing happens after as and than. Informal I've got the same number as him ...
user516076's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
47 views

What is the difference of the word "me" in these two sentences?

What are the grammatical terms to describe the two different ways of using the words "me" in these two sentences? This is me Kill me I found out that there is a difference between these ...
Yang's user avatar
  • 57
1 vote
1 answer
46 views

Can I repeat the subject in a sentence?

I have the following excerpt in a paragraph Professionals in the pain management field believe PE influences physiological mechanisms and outcomes of pain. They consider they should use PIs to ...
Graziella Bedenik's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
90 views

Does a subject “it” refer to the preceding subject or preceding object if both might fit semantically?

In a technical text, I once wrote a sentence similar to the following one: As the aforementioned notion of the maximal doodad is based on the long thingum, this notion targets extended hickeys, such ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

I can’t give you anything but love

As I understand it, personal pronouns are often used in English, but this phrase doesn't contain a pronoun "my", i.e. "... but my love." Why is it so? Will it be the excess word ...
Sergei's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
652 views

What is the difference between 'us' and 'ourselves' in the following sentences?

What's the difference in meaning between the following two sentences? Sometimes we look to others to convince us of what we want to believe. Sometimes we look to others to convince ourselves of what ...
Ji Hyun Lee's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Should it be "Who is it" or just "Who is" in "Who is it going to pay for it?"

I was just talking with my family about selling a computer and my aunt said: But, who is going to pay for it? And I wonder, shouldn't she have said it like this: Who is it going to pay for it? ?
Mary's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
1 answer
106 views

Which is the correct answer to "who is…?": "He is…" or "It is…"?

I'd like to know how to begin the answer to the following question. Who is the actor that played an action hero in Speed, a cyber-criminal in The Matrix, a killing machine in John Wick, and who’s now ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
188 views

What does 'they' refer to?

Sometimes I have difficulty identifying pronouns. What do all the 'they' and 'them' refer to? Do they all refer to children? Children’s limited life experience and their level of intellectual ...
user134653's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
945 views

Why "yourself" instead of "you"?

In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004) movie, Tom says to Harry Potter about Hedwig, an owl: Tom: Right smart bird you got there, Mr. Potter. He arrived here just five minutes before ...
Bobby Omega's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

decided by themselves/them/them themselves [closed]

Which of the following options is correct? There are more and more career women. Their value is decided by them / themselves / them themselves.
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
687 views

Which pronoun should be used for the country Germany in a tag question?

What will be the tag question of the following sentence? Germany is a beautiful country, isn't {she/he}? Shouldn't we use the pronoun "she" as country is always considered as motherland? ...
Junayed Hasan's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

Pronoun or noun?

In one of the Batman movies, the Joker greets someone as "Hello, beautiful". Is "beautiful" a pronoun in this case? If it is not, what would you call it? Thank you
BatmanDontTell's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
660 views

Which is correct "your" or "their" when combining questions?

What is one to do when they are locked out and therefore unable to access the Slack support channel, or have to email sysadmin from an address other than your work one? I came across the above ...
Vlad's user avatar
  • 409
-1 votes
1 answer
50 views

What are the rules for using : it's or its?

I am often corrected on StackExchange for writing it's instead of its Few minutes ago : I start a game by it's shortcut ==> I start a game by its shortcut I am (quite) sure that when I was young, I'...
Marc Le Bihan's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
113 views

Which is correct: Betty and he are friends or Betty and him are friends? Please explain. Thank you

Isn't it him is an object pronoun and not subject pronoun. Why do we need to use Betty and him and not Betty and he? Please explain. Thank you.
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
166 views

It is difficult to accept (it)

I am speaking about a man who receives a piece of advice from a friend, but because the advice entails radical changes in his life he replies: Your advice is so demanding, it is difficult to accept! ...
fev's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
355 views

What is the correct Object Pronoun to complete the sentence "I don't play soccer and volleyball because I don't like ____"

What's the correct object pronoun to complete the following sentence, "it" or "them"? "I don't play soccer and volleyball because I don't like _____." Edit: Do I use the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

When public speaking, use "you" to refer to a group of people or a person?

Question 1: When we deliver a speech, do we use "you" to refer to the listeners or refer to each one of them as we are talking to him/her personally? Talking to all of them (use "you&...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,235
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

being late or my being late?

Are you angry with me because of my being late? Are you angry with me for being late? Is it considered a good practice to add the personal pronoun in this case as in the first example? Does the ...
Let's user avatar
  • 709
0 votes
1 answer
156 views

I brought my pen, (my) keys, (my) bag etc

Do I need to repeat a personal pronoun every time I use some noun with it? I brought my pen and pencil or I brought my pen and my pencil What if we have more nouns? I took my glasses, my phone, ...
Michael Azarenko's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

Which one is more acceptable? [duplicate]

Which one is more acceptable? 1. Each boy and each girl has done his duty. 2. Each boy and each girl has done his or her duty. 3. Each boy and each girl has done their duty. Edit: Here ...
Sandip Kumar Mandal's user avatar