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Questions tagged [phonetics]

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36 views

About “dark l” sound in daily conversation

Could you please tell me that if you really make the dark l sound in words like “call” “wall” “fall” or “hole” in daily conversation, like you can feel the movement of your tongue, or just do it when ...
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1answer
27 views

a problem with Alphabet Phonetic in Longman dictionary

I know vowels have short and long sounds. In the Longman dictionary it has been displayed. But on this webpage, I don’t know what is the difference between /ɪ/ and /i/ and /i:/ ? (for example in “bit”...
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0answers
21 views

Is there any problem in pronunciation of words with Phonetic Alphabet?

I have pronounced the English words with Phonetic Alphabet(in the site ldoceonline.com) for almost 1500 words and I have improved very well. But I didn't see anyone that uses this method for a large ...
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2answers
35 views

How to tell apart a long “oh” and a long “oo”?

In this comic there's a long "ooooooh" at the end. How can I tell if it's a long "oh" (/o/) or a long "oo" (/uː/)? I thought it could be the 'h', but I don't think I've never seen "ooooooo" anywhere....
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2answers
273 views

Is there a word where `w` can not be replaced?

The below list of word pairs are phonetically similar - Water - vaater World - Vorld Win - Vin Worn - Vorn It seems like every W vord can be replaced by a corresponding V word. Is there a ...
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1answer
59 views

Why “interference” has pronunciation of “/… fɪə …/”?

We speak "interference" as: /ɪntə'fɪər(ə)ns/. However, I do not understand why we don't say it as: /ɪntə'fɜːr(ə)ns/? Just like the word "infer". Why do we pronunce differntly about "fer" part in these ...
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1answer
34 views

What is the meaning of suprasegmental phoneme?

What is the meaning of suprasegmental phoneme? Is it related to suprasegmental features? If it is a kind of phoneme, what characteristics it owns?
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1answer
59 views

Improve pronunciation if one's English level is already ~C1?

I've been studying English for a while and considered myself a good speaker (mostly because I had passed CAE a year ago). Lately, though, I found myself in an environment where English is used a lot ...
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2answers
94 views

how to pronounce “in that”

I am wondering how to pronounce "in that", where in that is a synonym for because. I have little understanding of reduction. Is it right to pronounce it /inə/?
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1answer
232 views

Anyone succeeded to teach/recognize the difference in L and R listening wise?

I'm Japanese clueless about the difference in between the sound of L and R in the most case. I thought I should just give up, but it's too much obstacle to just ignore. (It's painful to remember ...
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1answer
70 views

Pronunciation in British v. American English

Why are words like privacy pronounced like ˈprɪv.ə.si in British and ˈpraɪ.və.si in American (short vowel in the first case, long in the latter one)? I read that determining whether a vowel is short ...
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1answer
989 views

What's the difference between “ɜ” and “ə”?

Someone said, one is k.k sound mark, and another is international sound mark. Then, I find this They are both in one phonetic system. Why?
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2answers
743 views

Example Sentence for learning 'short' vowel sounds

As a teaching tool, I'm looking for a sentence that contains the 5 short vowel sounds (cat, get, sit, got, mud). The sentence should be as short as possible, contain words that are as phonetically ...
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2answers
181 views

The pronunciation of /t/ in British and American English

I am a non-native learner of English. This is the "yod-dropping" issue, when it comes to pronouncing words with letter ''T'', is it ok to pronounce some words British style and others American? Like: ...
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1answer
147 views

what is the pronunciation of boys' with both possessive s and plural s?

We are having a debate about the pronunciation of boys' with a plural s and a possessive s. Is there a pause at the end of the s or we just pronounce it with no pauses? is there a rule we should ...
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1answer
177 views

Phonetic transcription (or pronunciation) of date and diet

I'm an English learner and I've never been good at grammatical rules or other technical sides of English. However I need to learn them in order to graduate. And on my way to it, I'm taking a class in ...
2
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1answer
299 views

Did he say /t/ instead of 'th'?

https://streamable.com/vawsc “I am sixteen thousand years old — counting as you count.” Then he turned to Nikolaus and said Does the reader pronounce the first consonant in 'thousand' as /t/? As ...
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3answers
382 views

When does the letter “e” get to have a long sound before a consonant?

When does the letter 'e' have a long sound before a consonant? For example: senior venal menial -melia penal Venus Pelias And in the case of Pelias, why can 'e' have both a short sound and a long ...
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1answer
958 views

What's the difference about /t̬/ and /d/?

In the IPA.It has a diacritic, voiced.This mark always be used in AmE,japanese... such as water /ˈwɔːt̬ ər/,party /ˈpɑːrt̬i/,私 /ɰat̬aɕi/. So,if a voiceless consonant plus this voiced mark, how to ...
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0answers
35 views

Standardaized Way of Phonetic Acqusition [closed]

Hi here I want to start from the most fundamental and hard problem to me (and maybe to everyone). Two years ago, I had started a project to teach English to non-natives via only in English. Before ...
3
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1answer
602 views

What is the difference between /ʌ/ and /ə/?

In this Wikipedia article in the section talking about the use of schwa in Indonesian and Malay, they use /ʌ/ instead of /ə/ to write the words that have a stressed schwa. Also the pronunciation by ...
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1answer
235 views

Why does the schwa sounds like an 'e' in some words?

I've noticed that in some words the schwa sounds more like an 'e' and not 'ə', for exmaple: environment(.mənt), is with a schwa, but sounds like 'e'. Also in a word like 'substance'(.stəns) doesn't ...
2
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1answer
186 views

Does the lip shape change when pronouncing schwa for some syllables?

For instance in the word literature /ˈlɪtərəʧər/, does the lip shape change for each syllable with schwa, so they become more as if we were pronouncing /e/, /æ/ and /u/ respectively, or some other ...
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2answers
499 views

How to pronounce a new word like an English native speaker? [duplicate]

It occurs to me all the time, when I encounter a new word like a name/surname (say, SUE VERTUE) I ask myself, how do English native speakers know what to pronounce this new word even if they've never ...
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1answer
319 views

A rounded/unrounded vowel

http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~kjohnson/English_Phonetics/ Listen to Example 5 please I thought it had some roundedness to it. Is the vowel in this example really [ɑ]?
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5answers
2k views

When do I REALLY need to pronounce an s as a z?

Yeah, I know the rule that after a voiced consonant, the plural or 3rd person S should be realized as a Z. But I wouldn't trust that rule as far as I could throw it, because I constantly hear, say, '...
2
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1answer
148 views

How to pronounce correctly final Y in words such as “city” or “story”?

I am interested in pronunciation of the letter Y at the end of the words, such as city, story, belly, penny and so on. Wonder what sound it denotes. I understand it is some kind of [i] sound. But is ...
16
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4answers
5k views

Are English consonant sounds [p], [t], [k] aspirated before another consonant?

Most sources which I encountered say that English consonants [p], [t], [k] are aspirated before a vowel but not after [s], and become unaspirated after [s]. Canonical example: [p] is strongly ...
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4answers
219 views

The “p” in Trump

I used many online resources to find out how to correctly pronounce the ending /p/ in "Trump". Is it aspirated [pʰ] or is it just [p]? Dictionaries don't answer this question because they include ...
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2answers
227 views

How to properly pronounce the diphthong in “found” in American English

I hear American people say found as /faʊnd/. The /aʊ/ sound starts with [æ] (like in cat) and ends with [u] (ooh). However if I look up the word found, the pronunciation is shown as /faʊnd/ but is ...
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4answers
7k views

“Ball” and “bowl” do they really sound the same?

To my non-native ears, they always do even though the dictionary says otherwise. Do you say the two words in the same way in your speech? Additional information that might be useful: I understand ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Is Google Translate transcription scheme of English words suitable?

They use indications of long vowels and in general very appealing compared to weird IPA. On the other hand, their transcription of Russian is wrong and I would say, unsuitable. For instance, in their ...
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1answer
43 views

Intonation of “come off it!”

Which part gets a higher stress? The off, or the it? Come OFF it! Come off IT! Or the three words are equally stressed? COME OFF IT! Is there a fixed intonation pattern for exclamations, ...
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1answer
55 views

Help me decode a word: coptchat? cotchrat?

A man in a documentary Beyond good and evil says: Noone could fulfill that task and without suggesting crudely or simplistically that he coptrchat into madness, I do think that some such escape ...
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2answers
820 views

a practical way to write words in a Phonetic transcription

We've started learning about IPA Phonetic this year. And we shall have an exam next week. And since English isn't my first language, or even second , I don't really know the pronunciation of many ...
3
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2answers
388 views

do they sometimes omit the /d/ , /t/ sounds of the -ed ending?

In the phrase CCTV, closed circuit television; do we omit the -ed, and just say /kləʊz-sərkət-.../ in fast, connected speech. And, about the word "closed" itself, is it finished with an /zd/ or /st/ ...
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3answers
2k views

How is “X” pronounced in English?

The letter x can sound (most often) like [gz] and [ks]: [gz] in words like exam, exactly. [ks] in word like extra, hexagon, etc. I have found that x is pronounced [gz] whenever it’s in or before the ...
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2answers
413 views

Have you ever said “muna” instead of “gonna”?

What do you think about this word? Please watch this video for explanation.
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4answers
69 views

why the word “ergative” sounds like /ˈɜːrgetɪv/ but it's phonetic symbol is /ˈɜːrɡətɪv/?

http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/ergative?q=ergative the pronunciation of "ergative" in link sounds like /ˈɜːrgetɪv/ while it's phonetic symbol is /ˈɜːrɡətɪv/. the ...
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3answers
332 views

Do you native speakers pronounce “don't ask” as /doʊnæsk/?

This page said The /t/ is optionally silent when it follows /n/ and precedes a vowel sound, /r/ (including all r-controlled vowels) or a syllabic /l/. do you native speakers say "don't ask" as /...
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2answers
4k views

Pronunciation practice (J and Z)

My tutor is a native American English speaker, and I'm learning pronunciation and accent from him. I've practiced with him for one and a half hours today to make my J and Z sounds correct. [I'm also ...
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1answer
162 views

An easy to way improve my phonetic knowledge? [closed]

This question might sound a little silly but is there an easy way out to improve my phonetic knowledge? Do I have to learn every single word in phonetics? Because It's been a couple of months and I ...
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1answer
202 views

The Difference between “əʊ” and “ə”

about coat So, "-əʊ" (The Diphthong) sounds like "-oʊ" in American English, yet "-ə" sounds very far from "ɔː" or "ɒ" "-əʊ" has nothing to do with schwa?
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3answers
183 views

Why are a few letters named nothing related to how it is pronounced?

Why are the names of these letters so different from how they are actually used in words ? 1. F - there are no words that start with an "F" that use the pronunciation "ɛf". 2. L - there are no words ...
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1answer
757 views

The phonetic transcription of the word 'copies'

I checked more dictionaries and the phonetic transcription (IPA) for the word: 'copy' is [ˈkɑp i]. It's two syllables with stress on the first syllable. I know that the plural of "copy" is "copies" ...
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2answers
1k views

Two vowels together: “Go out” and “Go upstairs”

Is go outside correct? and also "go upstairs.". Since two vowels are followed by each other, eg., o then after this it's o again. How is that?
1
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1answer
294 views

Aspirated T in unstressed syllable

I read that p, t, and k are aspirated at the beginning of words, but are they aspirated in an unstressed syllable? For example, the first syllable in the word "today" is unstressed.
1
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1answer
301 views

How we should pronounce /ɔː/ phonetician in American English?

I have no problem with its pronunciation in British English, but in American English, yes. Do it have a sound like /əʊ/ as in 'go' or /ɒ/ as in 'got'? And I know that /ɔː/ and /əʊ/ aren't pronounced ...
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2answers
132 views

Word Stress in What am I supposed to do?

I heard this question: "What am I supposed to do?" asked often by native speakers in movies. I'm sure the stress is changing depending on the context, however I think there is a default unemphatic ...
4
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1answer
653 views

Question about assimilation

Good day [ɡʊd deɪ] and at time [ət taɪm] - is it a partial assimilation(loss of plossion), or maybe complete assimilation like in horse-shoe? And what about don’t you ? I know there's a form doncha ...