Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

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30 views

The American English learning counterpart of 'Cambridge English in Use'

I am seeking help on searching resources for learning American English collocations, phrasal verbs, idioms, and pronunciation skills. For work-related reasons I am seeking exclusively resources on ...
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“lose out” or “lose”?

I don't get the meaning of phrasal verb "lose out". Lets consider this example: The deal will ensure that shareholders do not lose/ lose out financially. In this context are they have any ...
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She shuts down in tears

I was watching an interview with a woman. At some point she choked up and ended the interview. Then a voice-over said: "She shuts down in tears". Is the verb "to shut down" used here in the sense of "...
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Is there any difference in meaning between “take up a challenge” and “take on a challenge”?

Is there any difference in meaning between take up a challenge and take on a challenge? For example: I am taking up the challenge of learning a new language. I am taking on the challenge of ...
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Can “spin on” mean “keep spinning”?

Can "on" indicate repetition on itself? For instance, does the sentence the planet spins on express the same thing as the planet keeps spinning?
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Can I say 'I'm picking up' meaning 'My health is getting better'?

The verb 'pick up' has a meaning "improve" so, provided there's an appropriate context, I think 'I'm picking up' can mean "I'm convalescing". However, one of other senses of the word is the opposite, "...
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1answer
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Is it correct and natural to use “put out” in the sense of maiking something available, such as a product or transportation?

Is it correct and natural to use put out in the sense of maiking something available, such as a product or transportation? For example: Because the buses are overcrowded athorities has decided to ...
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1answer
19 views

How do you use the phrasal verb 'rip off'?

Can I say 'rip someone off of [a sum of money or possession]'? Is this the right way to specify what exactly has been "ripped off" (if the object is a person or group of people)?
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32 views

Is it natural to use the phrasal verb “give back” when I lent something it somehody and I want it back?

Is it natural to use the phrasal verb give back when I lent something it somehody and I want it back? For example: Do you remember the drill I lend you? Could you give it back? If it's not really ...
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1answer
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Can I use the phrasal verb “come over” to ask someone to come to my home who lives in another city?

Can I use the phrasal verb come over to ask someone to come to my home who lives in another city? For example: My friend lives in York. I sometimes ask him to come over. Would it be more natural ...
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Is there any difference in meaning between “go on”, “carry on” and “get on” in the sense of continuing with something?

Is there any difference in meaning between go on, carry on and get on? For example: After a short break the teacher went on with the lesson. After a short break the teacher carried on with the ...
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Is it correct to say “take a job” or “take up a job” in the sense of accepting a job offer?

Is it correct to say take a job or take up a job in the sense of accepting a job offer? For example: I was offered a job abroad. Being a good opportunity to travel, sure thing I took the job. ...
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“make” or “make up” in context?

Tell me please if I have to use make or make up in the following context. To make sure you have a good understanding of how to use the present simple, I want you to make (up) a few sentences in it.
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21 views

The use of “write” or “write down” in context

Let's say a teacher is going to have their student to write a few example sentences with a certain word in their notebook. Would they say write or write down to tell the students to do that. For ...
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2answers
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Is “move in” ALWAYS a phrasal verb?

I am trying to understand phrasal verb. I thought in this situation: (My friend is doubting about two kind shoes: Asics and Geox ...) Me: Those shoes look nice but... Why do you want the shoes?...
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The use of the phrasal verb “take up” in context

Does the use of take up sound correct and natural in the following sentence? When I was at school, I took so many notes that sometimes they took up a few dozens of pages. Would it be better to say ...
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1answer
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You keep me hanging on

What is actually the phasal verb in a sentence: You keep me hanging on "Keep on" or "hang on"? What do we have here? Double phrasal verb? I am trying to figure this out for a while today... This is ...
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1answer
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What is the difference in meaning between “cut” and “cut up”?

What is the difference in meaning between cut and cut up? For example: Cut the bread into thin slices. Cut up the bread into thin slices.
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Which one is more natural: “cut bread thin”, “cut up bread thin”, “cut bread thinly” or “cut up bread thinly”?

Tell me please which of the following sentence sounds the most natural. You have to cut the bread thin. You have to cut up the bread thin. You have to cut the bread thinly. You have ...
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The difference between “use up” and “run out of something”

Consider these two sentences: I have used up all my pencils. I have run out of pencils. Which one, if either, is better? What is the difference? In what context should I use each one?
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1answer
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A new cabinet has been sworn in (in) Dhaka

'Swear in' is a phrasal verb. Do I need to add another preposition after the phrasal verb - in this case 'in' - if I want to mention the name of the place?
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Phrasal verb - stamp something out (words' position)

I have read this, and I read "and stamping out an epidemic that has killed more than 1,000 people and infected more than 40,000." So, from Cambridge Dictionary I get: stamp something out — ...
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Phrasal verb - stamp something out (definition)

I have read this, and I read "and stamping out an epidemic that has killed more than 1,000 people and infected more than 40,000." So, from Cambridge Dictionary I get: stamp something out — ...
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1answer
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“To give on something” meaning

In Marriage Story, Bert (the lawyer) says: "If we give on LA right now and then try to make the best deal possible, I think we can get her to give on other fronts" What the heck does give on mean? ...
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“Wipe” or “wipe down” in context?

Let's say I am eating ice cream with a friend and the friend got some ice cream on their face. And I point that out so that he will remove it. Do I say you have some ice cream on your face, wipe it ...
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What does “Pull oneself up by something” mean?

Sometimes I've come across the "phrasal verb" "Pull oneself up by something" and I really don't understand the meaning. I researched, but I couldn't find the meaning. For example: Farm people are ...
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3answers
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Is there any difference in meaning between “work” and “work out” when used in the sense of having a positive result?

Is there any difference in meaning between work and work out when used in the sense of having a positive result? For examle: My plan to make easy money didn't work. My plan to make easy money ...
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Is there any difference in meaning between “dry” and “dry off”?

Is there any difference between dry and *dry off? For example: Let the fruit dry (off) before eating. I cannot see any difference, but I am very curious to know what would make native English ...
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How to use the word “filter” to mean exclude?

If I wrote a program that can exclude all the lines in a computer file that are more than 200 characters long, should it be it can filter all the lines more 200 characters long it can filter out all ...
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2answers
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Is it natural to use the phrasal verb “fasten up” in the sense of fastening one's belt in a car?

Would a native English speaker use fasten up in the sense of fastening one's belt in a car? For example: You had better fasten up as you never know what might happen on the road. If it sounds off, ...
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What is the difference between “what is going on with you” and “what is going on for you”?

What is the difference between go on with someone and go on for someone. For example: You are so pale! What is going on with/for you. I though that the correct preposition was with when used with ...
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The use of “take”, “take back”, “have back” and “get back” in context

Let's say my tablet stopped working and I took it to a rapair shop and said it would be fixed in three days. After three days I came back and what do I say to the shop assistant to tell them that I ...
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To agree with someone

According to Cambridge Dictionary the phrasal verb agree with someone can be used in the following way: If a situation or new conditions agree with you, they make you feel healthy and happy: ...
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Backed up mail?

I'm working on a late Thank you email to my co-workers in response to the Get well soon card I got in the mail. Hi team, I got the backed up mail today from the mailbox and saw a very cool looking ...
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1answer
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What does “hold down a corner” mean?

I have come across it in this video. It is 13 minutes and 23 seconds. There are times when you get bunched up, and you might be with two or three people to hold down a corner.
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order of objects with phrasal verbs (e.g “put on”)

Let's take the phrasal verb "put sth on" in the meaning "to cover part of the body with clothes". Having the direct object only (as a pronoun), the sentence is: I put it on. Now, I want to add the ...
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What is the difference between “put back” and “put away”?

Is there any difference between put back and put away? For example: After you finish reading, please put the books back/away.
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What is the verb or phrasal verb do describe the action when someone persistently wants to be friends with someone especially when they aren't wanted?

What is the verb or phrasal verb do describe someone's action when they persistently wan to be friends with someone especially when they aren't wanted and welcom and their behaviour isn't of sexual ...
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The meaning of the phrasal verb “get on” in context

I have come across it in this video. It is at 6 minutes and 5 seconds. Still, there have been attempts to create circular and square smartphones, but as you can guess, they didn't get on. Does the ...
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That sky going to hold? Could you explain this sentence for me?

I was watching the movie called ‘Flight.’ In the movie scene, the fight attendant said to a pilot as soon as the pilot land on the plain, and said like ‘that sky gonna hold?’ I had searched on google ...
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3answers
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What word or phrasal verb is used for describing the process of removing chalk from ones clothes with one's hands?

Let's say I someone accidentally leaned against a blackboard and got chalk stains on their clothes. What word or phrasal verb would you use to describe the process of removing the stains with one's ...
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What do you call the process of filling up an electric kettle and turning it on in one verb or phrasal verb?

What do you call the process of filling up an electric kettle and turning it on? Does set up fit the context? For example: Please set up the kettle. We need some hot water.
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What “find out” implies in this context?

The Times: last Sunday night I turned on the TV to find out what was happening in Libya Does this means that I turned on the TV intentionally to know what is happening in Libya because I heard ...
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Meaning of the phrasal verb “get at” in context

I found it in this article. Here it is: Cases like these give us reason to take the notion of a true self seriously. It’s tempting to say that what’s going on at the office party when you don’t ...
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What does “comes out” mean in that sentence?

In that sentence "In this situation... All that comes out is a sigh..." Does phrasal verb "comes out" (come out) mean exactly which of these definitions? 1. to stop being fixed somewhere. 2. to be ...
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How do you know that a Phrasal Verbs can be separate or not?

I am a new English learner and our teacher were talking about Phrasal Verbs, even though I am the most hard work kid in our class I still don't understand how to know a Phrasal Verb can be separate or ...
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The use of the phrasal verb “mess someone around” in context

Let's say there is a woman who wants to be in a relationship with a guy, but the guy isn't sure if he wants to be in a serious relationship with the woman. And because the uncertainty he has been ...
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Does 'turn around' mean 180° or 360°?

So as to rotate and face in the opposite direction. So it's what Lexico says on the meaning of the adverb 'around'. And yet, if we talk about, say, a woman showing her new dress, she would ...
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“talk something over” vs discuss

What is the difference between "talk over" and discuss? Let's discuss it. Let's talk it over. Could you please provide a case where you woul use one but not the other?
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Will meaning of the verb change if I replace 2 parts of the phrasal verb? [duplicate]

For example : cross something out - He crossed out this title or He crossed this title out. Is there difference between two these options or not ? Will common meaning of the word change ? ...

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