Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

0
votes
1answer
11 views

“Serve sth out VS ”Dish sth out"

Based on many dictionary definitions the nuance between the two phrasal verbs below is so subtle that I cannot tell them apart at all! For instance I'm not able to distingush the foollowing sentences ...
0
votes
2answers
22 views

“Guess something” or “guess at something”

I realize I don't know the difference between "guess something" and "guess at something". I really don't understand why anyone would use "guess at something" instead of "guess something"? 1- John ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

“Get {something} through to {somebody}” vs. “Get {something} across to {somebody}”

How do these expressions differ? Does one of them sound more forceful to you? For instance, in the following sentence, does using each one make any change in meaning: What are you trying to get ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

What's the difference between “walk someone over to” and “walk over to”

I heard that "walk someone over to" means accompany someone to a destination, but I am wondering "walk over to" means something, I want to say "walk a short distance to go talk to someone", but I am ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Should there be used two prepositions after a verb?

Now,I have an issue. There is the preposition "away" in English and the phrasal verb - be away. Which sentence below is correct - I am away the meeting I am away at the meeting ? SHOULD I use ...
1
vote
3answers
34 views

Phrasal verbs with “off”

Sometimes a phrasal verb has an object. If the object is a pronoun (it/them/me/him etc.), only one position is possible. We have to put the object beetween the verb and the preposition. For example: ...
28
votes
6answers
6k views

Is “plugging out” electronic devices an American expression?

Are these valid in American English as opposed to "unplug". Plug out the charger from the wall. I plugged out my TV. I found my radio plugged out. I started hanging out with some guys ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

“State all the languages you can speak __”, the suitable preposition

I have slightly changed the sentence in the question title to be both short and clear. The actual sentence I'm asking about is: It would be nice of you to comfort that person in all the languages ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

“burning” vs “burn out” vs “burn up”

My phone charger started burning up when I plugged it into the outlet. My phone charger started burning out when I plugged it into the outlet. My phone charger started burning when I ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Differences between “suck up” and “suck in”

I am not sure if we can use both phrasal verb to mean the same thing. I am thinking of using them as "swallow" or "gulp down". Is that semantically correct? For example: The black hole sucked up ...
3
votes
1answer
25 views

meaning of the phrasal verb “run to” in context

It is from this article. Amongst its findings, the survey reveals that close to half of all households cannot run to a week's annual holiday, even staying with friends or family. Does that mean ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Stuck on vs caught on vs snagged on

Let's say I walk by a door and my shirt gets "trapped" by the door. Did it get snagged on the door? Did it get caught on the door? Did it get stuck on the door? How do these 3 phrasal verbs ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

throw something “across” someone or something

Can I use "over" instead of "across" in the following sentence. 1- Tom threw a blanket across his knees. 2- Tom threw a blanket over his knees.
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Meanings of “back up” in American English

The Macmillan Dictionary entry for back up reads [intransitive/transitive] if traffic backs up, or if it is backed up, the vehicles are in a long line and waiting to continue moving ...
1
vote
4answers
79 views

Unattended/Unattended to?

I don't understand why we use "unattended to" instead of "unattended" in these examples. 1-Is a gunman 20 years-old simply a troubled youth who got overlooked and unattended to? 2-Shell, ...
0
votes
3answers
35 views

What does it mean to “bust out” a program on a computer?

What does it mean to "bust out" a program on a computer? for example: "bust out" the calculator.
1
vote
1answer
39 views

to keep the boy above his work

I came across the following phrase: Father's chief Maxim was always to keep the boy above his work. And for this reason he did not wish him to learn Latin till he was twelve years of age, when he ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Draw \ pull water from well

He is drawing water from well. He is pulling water from well. Which is more suitable in this context? Is there any suitable phrasal verb for this? Thank you.
0
votes
2answers
15 views

Meaning of “Spray down”?

I'd like to know how to use the phrasal verb spray down When you spray something down it means that you spray liquid over a surface using a pump or something else, correct? Can you say this then? ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

Difference between “in” and “for”

I am brainstorming ideas for mathematics research. I am brainstorming ideas in mathematics. I am wondering what's the difference between "in" and "for" when used in the phrasal verbs "brainstorm ...
10
votes
6answers
3k views

Put the phone down / Put down the phone

what's the difference between "Put the phone down" and "Put down the phone"? Is it the same? As for me the first one means literally to put the phone (the thing) down and the last one is to end the ...
2
votes
3answers
42 views

Using “Supposed to” in a prediction

I have been arguing with my friends over the usage of 'supposed to' for quite a while now. It is my belief that 'supposed to' is used to describe the obligation of the subject. For example: "I am ...
1
vote
2answers
25 views

“take off” is a noun phrase in “after take off”?

Boeing 737 MAX 8 in second crash in months Both were operated by well-known airlines with strong safety records -- but the Lion Air flight went down 13 minutes after take off, while Sunday’s ...
1
vote
1answer
11 views

“Cross over the river” OR “Cross the river”

Sentences: I want to cross over the river. I want to cross the river. Which one of the sentences conveys correct meaning?
2
votes
1answer
26 views

phrasal verbs with particle FROM

In the sentence - The boy saves his pet mouse from the cat. what is the function of the prepositional phrase from the cat? I'm pretty sure it is not adjective describing MOUSE. I'm thinking ...
2
votes
1answer
16 views

Work out at/come out at

Do the phrasal verbs in the title only mean "to add up"? Or can they mean "any mathematical calculation"? Like: This price works out at(comes out at) $30 per week. Or should it only be: The ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

meaning of “get on” in dictionary [closed]

One of the meanings of "get on" is to mount a car or to mount a vehicle or to mount etc. But there is not this meaning in the Longman dictionary and Oxford dictionary. Why?
0
votes
0answers
9 views

“Run away” and “Run off” difference in this context [duplicate]

He ran off from my house. He ran away from my house. Are these two sentences interchangable? Thank you.
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Hire and take on

"Take on" is an alternative for "hire". Like: We're not taking on any new staff at the moment. But this isn't my question. What I want to ask is can "take on" be used as a common and natural ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “be keyed upon something”?

It is from this video. It is at 6 minute and 40 second. Here is the context: But for those who have been, maybe, keyed upon this stuff or heard us discuss it before, or kind of tracking this ...
1
vote
2answers
30 views

“Prepare with” meaning in this context

I have a question in my textbook: What was Franz expected to be prepared with for school that day? Is "prepare with" a phrasal verb? Can I say : "I am preparing with mathematics tasks for school" ? ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

“Trace over” in this sentence [closed]

Trace over the dotted lines to complete the monkey's tail. Can I say 'trace' instead of 'trace over'? Is 'trace over' a phrasal verb? Please help me understand the uses of "trace over" and "trace", ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Would you tell me what 'play off of' means in this context?

Go pear shaped (The plan isn't working / plan is going wrong) ... In all likelihood, this has nothing to do with the fruit, but rather plays off of the expectation of something being round, but ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

What problems won't I put up with with you?

Just an interesting sentence. I want to know if it's compeletely alright for using and constructing this way: What problems won't I put up with with you?
0
votes
1answer
10 views

Might I enquire of you what “cut toward” means?

I was about to run toward the goal so Mark could pass the ball to me, but he looked me off. So instead I fell back and let Jenny cut toward the goal. Mark passed to Jenny and she scored! Although ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

Terms or phrasal verbs related to phone calls [closed]

Which terms are used for phone calls? I know only few and I am not sure if they are correct: Make a call - to call someone and talk; Call back - call the person who called but you didn't answer, ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

When to use “bugged out”?

Would someone please explain me in which context I'd use the phrasal verb bugged out? I've heard this expression once, but I couldn't understand its meaning as it seemed out of context.
0
votes
2answers
29 views

Fill the form UP or Fill the form IN

In school, for exams we FILL UP forms. But I have seen people saying "FILL IN the form." Fill the form in OR fill the form up, which is correct. Please explain.
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Is it correct to use “of” with “avoid”?

I read a sentence which was: Mr Prasad said the unicast avoids of all shortcomings of the existing methods. Is it correct to use "of" with "avoid"? I think we use "of" with "devoid".
3
votes
1answer
31 views

The meaning of “to make of” in Macmillan dictionary

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/make-of Macmillan Dictionary defines "to make of" as to use chances and opportunities in order to be successful. It also provides us two ...
0
votes
3answers
24 views

Is this a correct usage of « «made up of »?

Can we say: New York City is made up of five boroughs? Thks
0
votes
2answers
24 views

The word “pour” in this context

Pour the oil into the bottle. Pour over the oil into the bottle. As I am not a native speaker, using the word "pour" is difficult to me. Are these two sentences correct, or should I use something ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Which is suitable to use for this sentence [closed]

which is correct? Part of me is grateful thay he (didn't / doesn't) has an twitter account. or should i write this Part of me is grateful for his non-existence of twitter account. thank for your ...
2
votes
2answers
26 views

meaning of the phrasal verb “follow through” in context

I was reading a book and came across this: Undisciplined people eat what they want when they feel like it. An undisciplined person is removed from any aspect of health simply because of poor ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Difference between different constructions of the same phrasal verb

Is there any difference between the following 2 sentences or they are same? I found out its secrets. I found its secrets out.
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Take after with

Can I say "I took after my father his eyes" ? Or the only accessible option is " I take after my father. I have green pupils" ??? May I say " ii take after my father with his green eyes?"?
3
votes
1answer
64 views

It took two hours for her to finish her homework

It took her two hours to finish her homework. It took two hours for her to finish her homework. Q: I know #1 is correct and I guess #2 is also correct/natural. What is your opinion?
3
votes
2answers
40 views

Usage of 'as' before Adjectives:

In the following sentence, should I put 'as' before the adjective 'offensive'? I hope you won't take my criticism as offensive. I hope you won't take my criticism offensive. I feel as if the two ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

'Get STH over with' and 'get over with STH'

Now I understood why I need to use 'with' when I use this phrasal verb as a meaning of 'to finish STH which is mostly the speaker does not want to do' But I'm still confused by this thing Why I ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

This is going to be my chance to [verb] any difficulties. Solve or sort out?

The sentence This is going to be my chance to _____ any difficulties. is from an English test. Possible answers include: "solve", "sort out". And an examinee have to choose ONLY one right answer. ...