Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
53 views

Is it possible to use "look down on" in a phrase without meaning disdain?

Is it possible to use "look down on" in a phrase, without meaning disdain? Example: (if I'm standing on the moon) Can I use "look down on Earth", to describe a physical act of ...
Viviane's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

What does "run down leads" mean?

I stumbled on a post on a different forum by a native speaker who was explaining what the phrase "run down leads" mean in police work. The problem is that when I googled the phrase the ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
67 views

Many people died but some got out alive

In a video game that I'm playing called "Oblivion" I stumbled upon a village in which some kind of demon named Daedra set a fire to its resident's houses. One of them says: "Many people ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
68 views

How to know why some transitive phrasal verbs cannot be split

What is the reason that some transitive phrasal verbs with adverb particles cannot be split? Examples: 'My brother looks after my mother.' Likewise, come across, count on, and such are other ...
brp7's user avatar
  • 92
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

One soon gave out his last breath [closed]

This context comes from the book "The Wager" by David Grann. It's the beginning of the book in which a group of emanciated survivors found onboard a small drifting boat is described: "...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

It should be coming up here [duplicate]

In the TV show "The Leftovers" a family bough a house at an auction. The circumstances surrounding this purchase resulted in them no knowing what the house really looks like or where exactly ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
21 views

It should be coming up here

In the TV show "The Leftovers" a family bough a house at an auction. The circumstances surrounding this purchase resulted in them no knowing what the house really looks like or where exactly ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
48 views

We could set up there

This context comes from the TV show "The Leftovers". It's a scene in which two men talk about a plan to kill wild dogs who are a danger to the town they live in. A: So I found another pack. ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
94 views

Phrase "breeding up" in Animal Farm [closed]

I am reading George Orwell's Animal Farm and here I don't understand what the meaning of breeding up is here. You cows that I see before me, how many thousands of gallons of milk have you given ...
syed shuja zaidi's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
82 views

"They got up with the land" - sailor's parlance?

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XXIII, passage 371, published 1892) “Now, boys,” he said, after a pull at the hot coffee, “we're done with this Currency Lass, ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

"He was drinking from leaves." VS "He was drinking off of leaves." | Why "...off of...."? [duplicate]

"It rained so much over the time that he was away. He was just drinking off of leaves." Lost dog found (see:1:08-1:13) I understand the dog was drinking rainwater from the leaves. So, why ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 6,531
1 vote
0 answers
92 views

Verb being followed by 3 prepositions: ".......looking out across through their eyes ...... | Is this a slip of tongue or something else?

Most people, when they think about themselves, have this experience or this very powerful phenomena that they exist inside their heads, sort of looking out across through their eyes, controlling their ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 6,531
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

The workers balloted for a strike

The workers balloted for a strike. Does thhis sentence mean The workers — balloted to decide on whether to go on a strike or not, balloted and the result was to go on a strike (approved of a strike)...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,258
-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

What is the phrasal verbs to use when a tube is suddenly not plug anymore? [closed]

In a context where a tube connected to a device, suddenly the tube is not connected anymore for some reason. What is the correct phrasal verb to use? "the tube just came off" or "the ...
raphui's user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
2 answers
41 views

Is "help (to) do sth for sb" right?

I am a English learner. When I had English class, my teacher told me a phrase. help (to) do sth for sb I felt very confused about this phrase. Because there is a verb that has a verb phrase as an ...
Zhang's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

Can a phrase like "being honest" be considered a verb?

If I have a sentence like "I was talking with her", "talking" is clearly the verb, right? If I construct a similar sentence, "I was being honest with her", is "being ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 141
0 votes
1 answer
117 views

Meaning of 'make out' in " . . . you didn't, somehow, make out to give us the thing straight"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVIII, published 1892) Passage 281 I was but a little way down the street, when I was arrested by the sound of some one running,...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
-1 votes
1 answer
56 views

You're to stake your pile on Speedy

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVI, published 1892) Passage 253 “That is all very proper, Mr. Dodd; there is no wish to coerce you, believe me,” said Fowler; “...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
-1 votes
1 answer
60 views

Difference between using in and up north

Difference between using in and up: I live in London, but my relatives live up north, in Manchester This sentence can also be written as: I live in London, but my relatives live in north, in ...
nicku's user avatar
  • 775
5 votes
1 answer
200 views

Phrasal verb and the position of the object

I was told that the first sentence is usual but the second one would be hardly said. He got his memory back thanks to the album. He got back his memory thanks to the album. And I think both are OK ...
Englishy's user avatar
  • 337
-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

Is "fade apart" an idiomatic phrase for saying "die", "dying" or similar? [closed]

I apologize for any confusion earlier. It seems like you're looking for alternatives to "die" in phrasal form that ends with "apart." While this is a somewhat uncommon request and ...
Sayaman's user avatar
  • 13.5k
0 votes
1 answer
64 views

. . . we'll make that island to-morrow afternoon, and have the lee of it to lie under, if we can't make out to run in

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XII, published 1892) From these signs, I gathered that all was not exactly for the best; and I would have given a good handful ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
-1 votes
2 answers
152 views

What is the meaning of "lying over under all plain sail"?

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XI (last sentences), published 1892) Or was it really the eye, and not rather the heart, that identified that shadow in the ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
-1 votes
3 answers
164 views

Run Into vs run onto [closed]

Why is the phrase run into and not run onto ?When you run onto someone you dont go inside his body(LOL).In is for anything with interior structure,at is for specific locations in time or in space and ...
Cerise's user avatar
  • 117
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

Why some phrasal verbs can be conjugated [closed]

Why examples 2,3,6 can use conjugated phrasal verb but example 4 not use conjugated verb? I had had chocolates dry up in races before. I had had chocolates dried up in races before. I had had ...
Rocky's user avatar
  • 565
-1 votes
2 answers
124 views

Phrasal verbs 101

Many phrasal verbs make the language more aurally pleasent for example: "Hear me out!".The verb "hear" means "listen" but it doesnt sound well if you say "Hear me&...
Cerise's user avatar
  • 117
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

What do you take "put out" to mean in this context?

What do you take "put out" to mean in the following context? We had no sooner arrived at the address than I had other things to think of. “Mr. Dickson? He's gone,” said the landlady. Where ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

What do you take "to put up something for you" to mean in this context?

Then there's another thing. I had hoped you might have peddled that opium through the islands, which is safer and more profitable. But with this three-month limit, you must make tracks for Honolulu ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 719
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

Must phrasal verbs be idiomatic in order to be "real" phrasal verbs

What about phrasal verbs like sit down or go up as when you say, "the man goes up the mountain" or the imperative "Sit down", I wouldn't consider this phrasals as metaphors neither ...
Quique's user avatar
  • 602
8 votes
5 answers
4k views

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

Oxford's Collocations dictionary - 10th edition - for Android mobile app (licensed). wade verb ADVERB | PREPOSITION | PHRASES ADVERB slowly ashore The men waded ashore. across, back, out ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
4 votes
2 answers
927 views

Why does work out mean physical work or physical training?

How does the physical training meaning relates to the "finding a solution meaning" using the particle out? What's the perspective?
Quique's user avatar
  • 602
0 votes
2 answers
95 views

hold back from the suffering of the world

a. I have two questions about the phrasal verb 'hold back'. "You can hold back from the suffering of the world, you have free permission to do so, and it is in accordance with your nature, but ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,727
1 vote
1 answer
118 views

Start the day off strong [closed]

I do understand the meaning of "Start the day off strong", but I don't understand what this expression consists of, if I can put it like that. Is it the phrasal verb "start off"? ...
Lisablog's user avatar
  • 357
1 vote
1 answer
37 views

What does the phrase 'doubtful revelation' mean?

In this following context, how should I take the phrase 'doubtful revelation'? Does it mean teaching or information? And what does the verbal phrase 'found on' mean? Does it mean 'stem from'? ...
Sakya Kim's user avatar
  • 429
2 votes
1 answer
289 views

What's the meaning of "Making demands on someone" in the following context?

She (Julie) spent her time doing little more than taking care of him (Mark) and the children. Now her sister was getting divorced and would doubtless be making demands on her too. Does it mean that ...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
5 votes
8 answers
2k views

Is there a difference between "get to the dining room." AND "get over to the dining room"?

This is from a british tv show, where 3 students from state and private schools swap schools for a short time. School swap (see:10:25-10:32) They should get up, get showered, and get over to the ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 6,531
-1 votes
1 answer
55 views

How should I understand the participle phrase ''found useful''?

In this following context, should I take this sentence as: '' ....are found useful merely terms in conventional... ''? Does the phrase ''found useful'' modify the word ''terms''? Please, simplify this ...
Sakya Kim's user avatar
  • 429
0 votes
2 answers
170 views

"I cried for joy when I heard the news". Should it be "....cried with..." or "...cried out of...?

This is from the BBC news, abortion ban temporarirly lifted for medical emergencies "Lead plaintiff Amanda Zurawski said that for the first time in a long time, I cried for joy when I heard the ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 6,531
1 vote
1 answer
61 views

What's the difference in meaning and usage between 'to get a present off someone' and 'to get a present from someone'?

What's the difference in meaning and usage between to get a present from someone and to get a present off someone
tes389's user avatar
  • 87
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

"Knocking through the basement of his home"

What does "knock through" mean in this context? I searched it in the Cambridge dictionary, and it says it refers to making a whole in a wall between two rooms or demolishing that wall ...
Sergey Zolotarev's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
204 views

"Someone or other" vs "someone"

Does "someone or other" have the exact same meaning that "someone"? I don't see a difference in these two sentences: a) Someone or other broke that window. b) Someone broke that ...
m26a's user avatar
  • 621
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

What is the meant destination when using the phrasal verb "drop by" without object?

I found an example sentence in Collins dictionary when searching for the phrasal verb "drop by": She and Danny will drop by later. Where will she and Danny drop by? Is it the speaker's/...
Vova's user avatar
  • 321
0 votes
2 answers
3k views

"loop someone in" and "loop someone into chatting"?

I learned from this tutorial that there are three forms of phrasal verbs: verb + adverb verb + preposition verb + adverb + preposition And I find two phrases online, namely "loop someone in&...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,293
1 vote
0 answers
61 views

Is there general rule to make noun from phrasal verb?

Like a rule to put an actor suffix like a extinguish -> extinguisher to make a noun from the verb to explain the actor of the action, is there any rule to make a noun of the actor of the action ...
Ueda Takeyuki's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

Are ‘up’ and ‘down’ prepositions or adverbs in "walk up" and "fall down"?

What's the function of "up" and "down" in mentioned examples? We walked up the hill to the house. Be careful, don't fall down the stair. Preposition or adverb?
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

What is the definitive difference between "wish for something" and simply "wish something"?

I have been looking in dictionaries, and while the examples do provide some insight into the difference, I can't really derive definitive nuances specific to each option. What are they, if they exist?
James Campbell's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
60 views

Can I interchange fall down for fall off?

If I say, I was on my motorcycle and I fell down, Would you still be able to understand? How weird does it sound? While on my bike, my trunk is in an upright position and literally I will fall in a ...
Quique's user avatar
  • 602
-1 votes
2 answers
69 views

What’s the meaning of “expand into” in the sentences: The company is hoping to expand into the European market [closed]

The company is hoping to expand into the European market. Is it means- wants to make more money from European market..
Sam's user avatar
  • 1,855
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

How should I know the verb 'confound'? or verbal phrase 'confound with'?

In this following context, which meaning of the verb 'confound' should be taken?: cause surprise or confusion in (someone), or mix up (something) with something else Does the following proposition '...
Sakya Kim's user avatar
  • 429
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

carry on one's work vs. carry one's work on

He carried on his work. vs. He carried his work on. Is there any difference between the two sentences? I see the first one 'He carried on his work.' more often.
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,258

1
2 3 4 5
23