Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

0
votes
0answers
25 views

Difference between put up/ put on

I was looking for the meaning of "put up" and came across this explanation in a dictionary : " [put up something] to make a particular effort in order to achieve or prevent something : For example :...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

What does the phrase “run on to” mean here?

Here is a sentence from a text describing a football match: You can play the ball along the floor for your winger to run on to. Any suggestions on the meaning of the phrase "to run on to" here?
2
votes
2answers
102 views

Does “Process up” exist in English?

I will leave her alone for now so that she can process things up. I think for a sentence like this one, "process up" makes a suitable fit. I assume it means "absorb", but I didn't find it used ...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

give correct prepostitions into sentences to make meaningful phrasal verbs [closed]

my farther has been ___ since he lost his job they decided ___ a course of action the brothers entered ___ an agreement have you got ___ the flu yet? *explain your anwser, plz
0
votes
3answers
39 views

<Get beaten up> or <get beaten badly>

Beat up as a transitive verb means: "to give a severe beating to, etc." Example: I got beaten up by thugs on my way home. Also, Cambridge says: Beat up: to hurt someone badly by hitting or ...
1
vote
2answers
20 views

What does it mean when you say someone “got it all figured out”

I was watching the TED video Refusing to Settle, and the speaker mentioned a friend who had a great job and life, and said: "He got this amazing job at one of the top corporate firms, making well over ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Phrasal Verbs, how is it work?

Her hair peeked out under the brim. Why it is wrong if I leave out from that sentence? She walked along the bank Why it is wrong if I say "she walked on the bank"? As an English learner, what is ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Should I use agreed or agreed to

In the following sentence For Sri Lanka, Mr. Modi’s message is one of solidarity in the aftermath of the Easter Sunday terror attacks and the communal violence that followed, as well as a ...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

To be seen in something

What does this phrase mean? Is it a phrasal verb? Saturn is seen in Leo.
-1
votes
1answer
13 views

When you move towards someone or something

Editted: When someone comes up to you, they approach you while they are moving towards you. But what (phrasal) verb is used in an opposite case? For instance, you say: The small girl came up ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

“Head to” vs. “head down to”. What is the difference?

I have a sentence in a book: During the summers, Noel and the children headed down to Boca Raton, Florida, where Elizabeth’s aunt and uncle owned a condo with a beautiful view of the Intracoastal ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Which expressions, verbs, vocabulary… Should I use in the writing for the B2?

I'm going to take an exam of the B2, and I wanted to know, what is the vocabulary, the expressions... Etc... That they want? Because all I can find in every website is "complex expressions... ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Why “coming up”? Why not simply “coming”?

I'd like to know the difference between the usage of coming up and coming. For example, the Pink's song says: "I'm coming up so you better get this party started". If someone removes the "up", would ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

Put up a picture

I was wondering about when to use this phrasal verb ‘put up’ As far as I know, if someone says they’re putting up a picture, It means they’re displaying it on their wall, but could it mean they post ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

“Put something into action” versus “put something into practice”

How do the following sentences differ in meaning: Put your promise into action. Put your promise into practice. Dictionaries' definitions are so close that I cannot tell these expressions ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

“Best return on your money” vs “Best return for your money”

I am confused which preposition is correct in the statement: Best return on your money. or Best return for your money. ? Which do you think is correct? Please explain.
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Why is “more than meets the eye” grammatical in some cases?

I find this idiom very interesting, idiomatic and intuitive but not that grammatical to me. Why should we use meets, the third-person singular simple present sense? Can I change it to any other senses?...
1
vote
2answers
21 views

How do you carry out your task

I want to understand how to use the phrasal verb "carry out" So my question is, Can I ask How do you carry out your task? Which tools do you use? and can I ask: Do you still carry out your ...
2
votes
2answers
103 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb draw up

Meaning of the phrasal verb draw up is to come to a halt and it is used the following way The train drew up at the station. He drew up his car outside my house. But I found a sentence in ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

When you help someone escape from a place

The phrasal verb get somebody out means: "to help someone escape from or leave a place." I hvae heard get someone "away" is used in this sense too, but I couldn't find any reliable dictionary which ...
1
vote
1answer
11 views

“To lift something and carry” in this context

I just saw a sentence in a BBC English learning video: Did you carry the bike up with you? To mean: Lift the bike and carry. As a basic learner carry sth up seems to carry sth upward to me. Is ...
2
votes
3answers
223 views

How to find proper phrasal verbs or idioms for the sentence you're translating?

Let's assume you're translating a sentence. You can translate everything in English but sometimes there are idioms and phrasal verbs that you can use to make your sentnce more clear and compact. e.g., ...
0
votes
2answers
26 views

How do you use “scoop up”?

I am wondering if you can use the verbal phrase "scoop up" without clarifying what you are scooping up and just mentioning from what container you are scooping up. For example: She scooped up an ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

“To be back to/at work”, which preposition is the correct one?

I am studying with the "Grammar in Use" (2019) by Murphy, going through phrasal verbs. I found this example at pag. 275. "My holidays are nearly over. Next week I´ll be back at work". Is it a mistake?...
1
vote
2answers
28 views

“investigate” or “investigating”

"This research was devoted to investigating the performance" I always use Investigate after "to" as a infinitive, however I have seen some text that used "investigating" instead of "investigate", ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Does the phrasal verb “show X around” need an indirect object?

I am not sure if the phrasal verb "show X around" needs an indirect object, X being a direct object. I am thinking you need to show a person around somewhere, but I am also thinking it might not be ...
-1
votes
1answer
16 views

“Serve sth out VS ”Dish sth out"

Based on many dictionary definitions the nuance between the two phrasal verbs below is so subtle that I cannot tell them apart at all! For instance I'm not able to distingush the foollowing sentences ...
0
votes
2answers
26 views

“Guess something” or “guess at something”

I realize I don't know the difference between "guess something" and "guess at something". I really don't understand why anyone would use "guess at something" instead of "guess something"? 1- John ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

“Get {something} through to {somebody}” vs. “Get {something} across to {somebody}”

How do these expressions differ? Does one of them sound more forceful to you? For instance, in the following sentence, does using each one make any change in meaning: What are you trying to get ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

What's the difference between “walk someone over to” and “walk over to”

I heard that "walk someone over to" means accompany someone to a destination, but I am wondering "walk over to" means something, I want to say "walk a short distance to go talk to someone", but I am ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Should there be used two prepositions after a verb?

Now,I have an issue. There is the preposition "away" in English and the phrasal verb - be away. Which sentence below is correct - I am away the meeting I am away at the meeting ? SHOULD I use ...
1
vote
3answers
38 views

Phrasal verbs with “off”

Sometimes a phrasal verb has an object. If the object is a pronoun (it/them/me/him etc.), only one position is possible. We have to put the object beetween the verb and the preposition. For example: ...
29
votes
6answers
7k views

Is “plugging out” electronic devices an American expression?

Are these valid in American English as opposed to "unplug". Plug out the charger from the wall. I plugged out my TV. I found my radio plugged out. I started hanging out with some guys ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

“State all the languages you can speak __”, the suitable preposition

I have slightly changed the sentence in the question title to be both short and clear. The actual sentence I'm asking about is: It would be nice of you to comfort that person in all the languages ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

“burning” vs “burn out” vs “burn up”

My phone charger started burning up when I plugged it into the outlet. My phone charger started burning out when I plugged it into the outlet. My phone charger started burning when I ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Differences between “suck up” and “suck in”

I am not sure if we can use both phrasal verb to mean the same thing. I am thinking of using them as "swallow" or "gulp down". Is that semantically correct? For example: The black hole sucked up ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

meaning of the phrasal verb “run to” in context

It is from this article. Amongst its findings, the survey reveals that close to half of all households cannot run to a week's annual holiday, even staying with friends or family. Does that mean ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Stuck on vs caught on vs snagged on

Let's say I walk by a door and my shirt gets "trapped" by the door. Did it get snagged on the door? Did it get caught on the door? Did it get stuck on the door? How do these 3 phrasal verbs ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

throw something “across” someone or something

Can I use "over" instead of "across" in the following sentence. 1- Tom threw a blanket across his knees. 2- Tom threw a blanket over his knees.
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Meanings of “back up” in American English

The Macmillan Dictionary entry for back up reads [intransitive/transitive] if traffic backs up, or if it is backed up, the vehicles are in a long line and waiting to continue moving ...
1
vote
4answers
88 views

Unattended/Unattended to?

I don't understand why we use "unattended to" instead of "unattended" in these examples. 1-Is a gunman 20 years-old simply a troubled youth who got overlooked and unattended to? 2-Shell, ...
0
votes
3answers
37 views

What does it mean to “bust out” a program on a computer?

What does it mean to "bust out" a program on a computer? for example: "bust out" the calculator.
1
vote
1answer
93 views

to keep the boy above his work

I came across the following phrase: Father's chief Maxim was always to keep the boy above his work. And for this reason he did not wish him to learn Latin till he was twelve years of age, when he ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Draw \ pull water from well

He is drawing water from well. He is pulling water from well. Which is more suitable in this context? Is there any suitable phrasal verb for this? Thank you.
0
votes
2answers
36 views

Meaning of “Spray down”?

I'd like to know how to use the phrasal verb spray down When you spray something down it means that you spray liquid over a surface using a pump or something else, correct? Can you say this then? ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Difference between “in” and “for”

I am brainstorming ideas for mathematics research. I am brainstorming ideas in mathematics. I am wondering what's the difference between "in" and "for" when used in the phrasal verbs "brainstorm ...
10
votes
6answers
3k views

Put the phone down / Put down the phone

what's the difference between "Put the phone down" and "Put down the phone"? Is it the same? As for me the first one means literally to put the phone (the thing) down and the last one is to end the ...
2
votes
3answers
55 views

Using “Supposed to” in a prediction

I have been arguing with my friends over the usage of 'supposed to' for quite a while now. It is my belief that 'supposed to' is used to describe the obligation of the subject. For example: "I am ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

“take off” is a noun phrase in “after take off”?

Boeing 737 MAX 8 in second crash in months Both were operated by well-known airlines with strong safety records -- but the Lion Air flight went down 13 minutes after take off, while Sunday’s ...
1
vote
1answer
12 views

“Cross over the river” OR “Cross the river”

Sentences: I want to cross over the river. I want to cross the river. Which one of the sentences conveys correct meaning?