We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
2answers
24 views

“Pull out a win”

Nevertheless, the Cubs felt giddy about pulling out the win. Anthony Rizzo described it as a season-defining moment. (source) This line sounds strange, even jarring, to me. To pull out of something ...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

Which is the difference between “apologise for” and “apologise about”?

All the books I read use the form "apologise for" but I actually found some forums where people use the form "apologise about". Is there any difference between them or are they just the same thing?
1
vote
1answer
9 views

Help me with “come into” collocations

I've just learned that the meaning of "come into" is : be important or relevant. However I don't get the following sentence: to come into a person's possession without having been paid for. Does ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Well vs Well up | Fill vs Fill up

As I find out some verbs in Oxford, well (up) and fill (up), has the particle given in round brackets, so... ...Is there a difference in meaning between the verb well and well up; fill and fill ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Took on the opportunity vs Took up the opportunity

What's the difference meaning between such expressions? I took on the opportunity to teach... I took up the opportunity to teach...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

'turn round' vs.'turn over'

What's the difference between 'turn round' to 'turn over' for the following contexts? Let's describe two scenarios in order to make my question properly understood: a) A patient stand in front ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

“up to the waist” or “down to the waist”?

I know that a pair of pants goes up to the waist, but what about a shirt? Does it go down to the waist? That's would make sense to me, as pants slide up in the body and a shirt slides down in the body,...
4
votes
2answers
41 views

Is there a difference between “pile on” and “pile up”?

From the Cambridge Dictionary I got the following: Pile up: To increase in amount. The work was piling up, and I decided I had to go in to the office on the weekend. Pile on: to increase ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Constituency tests — is a phrase like this a constituent?

When we have a sentence with a strange syntactic position, how do we know if a phrase is a constituent? For example, "The two shortest of the books" Is [of the books] a constituent? I tried ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “give” and “give away”?

Is there any difference in meaning between give and give away. For example: The old man gave all his money to the people in need. The old man gave away all his money to the people in need. I ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Is natural to use the phrasal verb “check with” in the sense of “consult”?

Is it natural to use check with in the following sentence? If you don't know the meaning of words, check with dictionaries to find out.
0
votes
2answers
27 views

Is it natural to the phrase “stop with” in the sense of choosing something after consideration?

Is it natural to stop with in the following sentence? We were offered the car in a lot of colors, but We stopped with a red one.
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Meaning of “pass on”

I found on the free dictionary By Farlex this definition: Link pass on : accept or approve someone or something and they gave this example : The committee passed on the proposal, so work can now ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb “hold over” in context

I have stumpled upon it in this video. It is at 37 seconds Here are three sunken lands that might hold you over until the fish people turn up. I have looked it up in a few dictionaries, but I ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb “set out” in context

I have stumbled upon it in this article. The nationalists are unconvinced by Mr Zelensky's promises to safeguard Ukraine's interests and not to cross his "red lines", set out in an urgent news ...
1
vote
1answer
13 views

Is there any difference between “wipe” and “wipe down”?

Is there any difference between wipe and wipe down? For example: I am going to wipe the board, so write down what I have written. I am going to wipe down the board, so write down what I have ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Hold out for the audiobook

Someone that I admire and that has a solid background has written in a post in relation to a book: "hold out for the audiobook - trust me" I looked at the dictionary and it says: Hold out for. ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What's [happen to] in this?

I've always thought that [happen to] is the phrasal verb indicating chance, which can be replaced as [by chance] such as... I happen to have some money in my pocket. = I have some money in my pocket ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

What does “take a nap between the snoozing lion and lamb” means?

This phrase is from the below paragraph in the book Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by Robert M. Sapolsky. The book has a number of personal roots. One is that, having had ...
3
votes
2answers
48 views

“curbing out cigarette smoking”

In this sentence "curbing out" reads strange. I can't find much on Google. It doesn't appear to have any meaning beyond "curbing", "inhibiting", and I am not sure the tag-along preposition "out" adds ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Meaning of the phrasal verb “turn around” in context

I stumbled upon this in this video. It is at 6 minutes and 16 seconds. The next type of akwardness is maybe one of the most common and this one that you want to turn around when you don't know what ...
31
votes
5answers
7k views

What does it mean by “my days-of-the-week underwear only go to Thursday” in this context?

Emily: Lorelai? I'm going shopping this afternoon. I thought I'd pick up a few things for Rory. Lor: I already took care of all that, mom. I got her two skirts and a bunch of tops. Emily: ...
3
votes
2answers
100 views

Why “Take something with [reflexive pronoun]” is incorrect?

People don't use bring/take/etc (If you know other similar verbs, please tell me) with reflexive pronouns. I heard that from one of my English teachers too. Why? As I know we need to use objective ...
1
vote
3answers
64 views

Is “draw in electricity/energy” idiomatic?

I googled "the contact draws in electricity" and found 0 result, yet it seems something you would read in an engineering paper or journal. I couldn't find anything. Is there a more idiomatic way of ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Why, speaking of a colonoscopy, does it say “they put it up your bottom” and not “they put it up through your bottom”?

This is a piece of dialogue about a colonoscopy from the series "Outnumbered" s03e03: — Yes, but how does it get inside your insides? — Well, they put it up your bottom. Why not "they put it ...
0
votes
2answers
19 views

“It goes to something” meaning

On a presidential debate analysis program on KCRW yesterday a guest gave his thoughts on Andrew Yang's sweepstakes pilot and labeled it a ploy. The host then followed by saying: I think it goes to ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

What does the phrase “swoop into” mean here?

I am not sure about the meaning of the phrase "swoop into" in the following sentence: You can use the app’s amazing flight tracking function to perfectly time when the flight will swoop into your ...
8
votes
1answer
954 views

What does the phrase “pinch apart” mean here?

Here is a sentence from a task management app: The app allows you to add tasks in several ways and in one of them you can pinch apart two items in order to squeeze a task in between them. I am ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

What does the phrase “pull down on” mean here?

Here is a sentence from a task management app: The app allows you to add tasks in several ways and in one of them you can pull down on a list to put a task to the top. I am not sure about the ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

“Our office was left early” – how do I say this naturally?

Plesase help me with below sentence construction. Yesterday our office was left early because of heavy rain Suggest me synonyms for left or any alternative sentence. I feel use of Past tense ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

What is the meaning of “blunder down”? [closed]

What is the meaning of "blunder down" in the following sentence? Sam blundered down the steps. Does its meaning depend on sentences?
1
vote
1answer
36 views

“It was me who brought it (my puppy) up” or “It was me who brought up it”

I've heard people use "It was me who brought it (my puppy) up" all the time and never heard of anybody use "It was me who brought up it" because when using "object pronouns" with phrasal verbs, we ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

'look along' the edges Vs 'look around' the edges

I'm staring at a computer screen, looking at the edges of the glass. I want to say: "I looked around the edges and the screen looked fine to me." Is it correct? The phrase, "looked around the ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Phrasal Verbs or Only the verbs?

Sometimes I see a Phrasal verb that its meaning is almost like of the verb that is in the Phrasal verb. For example: Now I'm sixteen and burning up a book Now I'm sixteen and I'm burning a book ...
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

What does the phrase “go over or through their own body” mean here?

I am not sure about the meaning of the phrase "go over or through their own body" in the following sentence: What makes the game challenging is that the birds can neither move backwards nor can ...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

What does the phrase “builds on the lore of the game” mean here?

I am not sure about the meaning of the phrase "builds on the lore of the game" in the following sentence: It’s interesting to see how the community builds on the lore of game. The fans are ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Can “passed on” be an alternative for “passed since”?

I want to write the following for shortening and for translation accuracy from Do you know how many years have been passed since your existence? to Do you know how many years have been passed ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Difference between beat and beat out

I'm wondering what's the difference between beat and beat out?(if there's any) For example what would be the correct form of using beat in this sentence : 1.She beat her enemy 2.She beat out her enemy
0
votes
1answer
23 views

meaning: work out questions

I saw the following example sentence in a dictionary, and am wondering whether "work out" means "find the answers to" or "prepare." And if it does not mean "find the answers to" here, could it have ...
2
votes
3answers
603 views

What does the phrase “head down the rat's hole” mean here?

Here is a heading of a game app's description: "Head down the rat's hole" The game lets you live the life of a rat that lives in a beautiful village. The player interacts with the rat's friends and ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What time do you go [in for/at]?

What is the correct way of saying the sentence below? “What time do you go in for?” OR “What time do you go in at?” In context I mean like going into work. I asked my husband what time he had to ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

What does “to shout over” mean, particularly as it has been used in a particular passage I’ve read with curious sytnax?

I don’t un­der­stand the mean­ing of shout over as it has been used in the fol­low­ing pas­sage from Pa­tri­cia High­smith’s novel, The Ta­lented Mr. Ri­p­ley: A well-dressed Ital­ian greeted ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

“Get along”, “Compromise”, “Put up” and “Cope with”

I wonder which choice works in my sentence and which one doesn't and why? I never forget the time Sam fought the BBC's reporter when he offended Sam by saying those words! I think as a diplomat, he ...
7
votes
1answer
988 views

“Plugged in” or “Plugged in in”

Where's the charger? It's not plugged in in the usual place. Where's the charger? It's not plugged in the usual place. I'm a native English speaker, but I've realised I'm not sure which of the ...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

Go around doing something

As far as I understand, "going around doing something" means doing something again and again. I have two questions: a- Can this phrase be used with positive situations as in the sentence 3. Does it ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Difference between put up/ put on

I was looking for the meaning of "put up" and came across this explanation in a dictionary : " [put up something] to make a particular effort in order to achieve or prevent something : For example :...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

What does the phrase “run on to” mean here?

Here is a sentence from a text describing a football match: You can play the ball along the floor for your winger to run on to. Any suggestions on the meaning of the phrase "to run on to" here?
2
votes
2answers
115 views

Does “Process up” exist in English?

I will leave her alone for now so that she can process things up. I think for a sentence like this one, "process up" makes a suitable fit. I assume it means "absorb", but I didn't find it used ...
0
votes
3answers
364 views

<Get beaten up> or <get beaten badly>

Beat up as a transitive verb means: "to give a severe beating to, etc." Example: I got beaten up by thugs on my way home. Also, Cambridge says: Beat up: to hurt someone badly by hitting or ...
1
vote
2answers
121 views

What does it mean when you say someone “got it all figured out”

I was watching the TED video Refusing to Settle, and the speaker mentioned a friend who had a great job and life, and said: "He got this amazing job at one of the top corporate firms, making well over ...