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Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

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“Prepare with” meaning in this context

I have a question in my textbook: What was Franz expected to be prepared with for school that day? Is "prepare with" a phrasal verb? Can I say : "I am preparing with mathematics tasks for school" ? ...
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What is the difference between the two sentences given?

In an elementary class English book I found both the sentences: Trace over the dotted lines and complete the monkey's tail. 2.Trace on the rain pattern. Tell me uses of "trace over" and "trace on". ...
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Would you tell me what 'play off of' means in this context?

Go pear shaped (The plan isn't working / plan is going wrong) ... In all likelihood, this has nothing to do with the fruit, but rather plays off of the expectation of something being round, but ...
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What problems won't I put up with with you?

Just an interesting sentence. I want to know if it's compeletely alright for using and constructing this way: What problems won't I put up with with you?
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Might I enquire of you what “cut toward” means?

I was about to run toward the goal so Mark could pass the ball to me, but he looked me off. So instead I fell back and let Jenny cut toward the goal. Mark passed to Jenny and she scored! Although ...
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Terms or phrasal verbs related to phone calls [on hold]

Which terms are used for phone calls? I know only few and I am not sure if they are correct: Make a call - to call someone and talk; Call back - call the person who called but you didn't answer, ...
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When to use “bugged out”?

Would someone please explain me in which context I'd use the phrasal verb bugged out? I've heard this expression once, but I couldn't understand its meaning as it seemed out of context.
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Fill the form UP or Fill the form IN

In school, for exams we FILL UP forms. But I have seen people saying "FILL IN the form." Fill the form in OR fill the form up, which is correct. Please explain.
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Is it correct to use “of” with “avoid”?

I read a sentence which was: Mr Prasad said the unicast avoids of all shortcomings of the existing methods. Is it correct to use "of" with "avoid"? I think we use "of" with "devoid".
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The meaning of “to make of” in Macmillan dictionary

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/make-of Macmillan Dictionary defines "to make of" as to use chances and opportunities in order to be successful. It also provides us two ...
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Is this a correct usage of « «made up of »?

Can we say: New York City is made up of five boroughs? Thks
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The word “pour” in this context

Pour the oil into the bottle. Pour over the oil into the bottle. As I am not a native speaker, using the word "pour" is difficult to me. Are these two sentences correct, or should I use something ...
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Which is suitable to use for this sentence [closed]

which is correct? Part of me is grateful thay he (didn't / doesn't) has an twitter account. or should i write this Part of me is grateful for his non-existence of twitter account. thank for your ...
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meaning of the phrasal verb “follow through” in context

I was reading a book and came across this: Undisciplined people eat what they want when they feel like it. An undisciplined person is removed from any aspect of health simply because of poor ...
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Difference between different constructions of the same phrasal verb

Is there any difference between the following 2 sentences or they are same? I found out its secrets. I found its secrets out.
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Take after with

Can I say "I took after my father his eyes" ? Or the only accessible option is " I take after my father. I have green pupils" ??? May I say " ii take after my father with his green eyes?"?
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Usage of 'as' before Adjectives:

In the following sentence, should I put 'as' before the adjective 'offensive'? I hope you won't take my criticism as offensive. I hope you won't take my criticism offensive. I feel as if the two ...
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'Get STH over with' and 'get over with STH'

Now I understood why I need to use 'with' when I use this phrasal verb as a meaning of 'to finish STH which is mostly the speaker does not want to do' But I'm still confused by this thing Why I ...
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This is going to be my chance to [verb] any difficulties. Solve or sort out?

The sentence This is going to be my chance to _____ any difficulties. is from an English test. Possible answers include: "solve", "sort out". And an examinee have to choose ONLY one right answer. ...
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Do I need to use preposition all time to use 'Check out'?

I was studying about Phrasal Verbs For now, everything was fine but only this thing has been kept making me be confused 😣 He just checked out of the hotel. I cannot use it without a preposition 'of' ...
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What does “stretch up” mean?

Here is the context: If you have to stretch up to get the belt’s prong in that last hole, you will be less able to exert pressure with your own abdominal musculature, since it must be contracted to ...
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Meaning of the phrasal verb “clamp down” in cotext

Here it goes: When you clamp down to hold your breath and tighten your trunk muscles, you create a pressure gradient between the inside and the outside.
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Transitive equivalent of “drag on”

I know that we can use "drag on" for something that is progressing slowly or lasts longer than expected. For example: The meeting dragged on for 5 hours. Is there any way to make this transitive? ...
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“Throw out of…” or “throw out from…”?

I wonder which version is correct? Correct me if I am wrong. I was thrown out from the place or I was thrown out of the place For example, I am at my friend's house and my friend has a ...
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Why do we say “look up a woman's skirt” instead of “look under a woman's skirt”?

Do they mean the same thing? Does look up mean "lift the skirt and look" whereas look under would be going under a woman's skirt and looking up? Sorry, it's hard to know what the phrasal verbs exactly ...
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work out meaning in context

I cannot understand which one of the following definitions for "work out" is appropriate for the piece of a conversation's one! Advisor: Well, good. So, bookstore isn’t working out? Student: ...
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“Women hold up half the sky.” meaning

Women hold up half the sky. This is an old Chinese saying. I wonder what hold up mean here. hold up is a phrasal verb, meaning *to remain strong or successful. Nevertheless, in the example, this ...
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What does mean “run parallel to”?

In the following sentence, what is the meaning of "runs parallel to"? The street where I live runs parallel to the main road through town. Is it a phrasal verb? (I could not find it in any ...
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“Hand it over” vs. “give it to me”

I want to know in which situation we don’t use the indirect object. For instance, Hand over: He also handed over a letter of apology from the Prime Minister. 'I've got his card,' Judith ...
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The use of “pick up on”

If you don't understand a person's language, you should try to pick up on the information on their face. This sentence seems a bit awkward to me. Though to pick up on something can mean to notice ...
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Meaning of the phrasal verb “dial in” in context

The following excerpt is from this article. Training in this fashion will not only dial in and perfect technique, but you’ll be optimizing your training as well.
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look up the dictionary VS look up in the dictionary

Usually the phrasal verb look up is used as follows. These example sentences are from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Can you look up the opening times on the website? I looked it up ...
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How to use “pick up”

I have a question regarding the term "pick up" and I want to emphasize more on "pick up skills after a long time". Can I say something like: I didn't use HTML for a really long time. It gets a ...
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“Shut up” figurative/metaphorical form.

Shut up I heard a lot of native speakers saying this phrasal verb with their friends. But what I noticed, though, was that they didn’t mean it literally. What meaning does it give when it doesn’...
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What does “stand with” mean?

The following article fron CNBC states: Trump says US stands with Saudi Arabia despite journalist Khashoggi's killing. McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs defines the ...
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Prashal verbs, same meaning

1 complete with the same meaning Do you have a good relationship with your neighbours? (Well) Do you ... your neighbours? I don’t know where to find a list with all the prashal verbs!
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Meaning of the phrasal verb “get in” in context

It is from Crash Course US history. It is at around 8 minute and 6 second. So it is not going to be Woodrow Wilson because it would be obvious, but I don't the names of any other prominent ...
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What does “withdraw into” mean? [closed]

What does "withdraw into" mean in the following sentence? Many depressed people just withdraw into themselves.
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How should I assimilate an unusual usage of a word?

From "Gone with the Wind": Tom and us left home early this morning before she got up, and Tom's laying out over at the Fontaines' while we came over here. As an English learner, I feel unfamiliar ...
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The correct usage of “come along”? [closed]

Would happiness come along Pain? (meaning come together) Would happiness and pain come along (meaning come together) Is 2 a correct usage of come along, when I mean the two things in question ...
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Paint is flaking off

I saw the verbs flake off and peel is used for these situations but I would like to ask how to inform a painter or someone about the problem in different and unambiguous ways. For example, which one ...
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Life is what you make (of) it

Is the preposition of necessary in the following? Life is what you make (of) it. I'd appreciate your help.
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Use of phrasal verb and preposition together in “He pulled the cap off of the marker.”

I have read it in a book: He pulled the cap off of the marker. Doesn't "pull off" show that the person removed the cap? Why to use "of"? In another sentence in the same book it is: He pulled ...
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The use of the phrasal verb “step up” in context

Tell me please if I used step up correctly in the following sentence. Step up closer to the car and try to budge it. What I am trying to say by the phrasal verb is come up closer. If the way I ...
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Change to vs Change with?

I have looked on the internet regarding this issue and could not find a definitive answer so I posted the question here. Which one do I use if I want to change something to something else? Example ...
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Is the transitive usage of “back off” common?

Both of them backed off their verbals, and eventual Indiana pledge Romeo Langford cut Louisville from his list of schools. (source) The meaning is clear, but I find the usage of "back off" as a ...
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to square it with your conscience or to scruple

to square it with your conscience means that something is congruent with your conscience. I would like to ask as to how to use it correctly and if the following example is correct. For example ...
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“The evening is spread out AGAINST the sky” [closed]

Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Like a patient etherized upon a table... The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T. S. Eliot What does against mean in ...
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meaning of the phrasal verb “wind down” in context

It is from this article. Here is the excerpt: Limit exposure to bright light at night: Turn off the screens and wind down for several minutes before bedtime. I cannot get whether the author means ...
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Correct usage of phrasal verb [knock sb/sth down]

I was doing a comprehension and I was to identify the adjective in a sentence.: The piano was knocked down to the highest bidder. I identified the adjective but could not understand the question ...