Questions tagged [phrasal-verbs]

a combination of a lexical verb and one or two particles having the same form as prepositions or adverbs, employed as a single verb. The term is sometimes reserved for combinations in which the particle may follow the object of the verb and is not fronted with a WH- relative object.

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Placement of the adverb in "The river Thames last froze over three decades ago."

I was solving a question for TOEIC prep, and found this sentence. The question was "The River Thames last ______ over three decades ago." freeze froze frozen freezing The book says the ...
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3 answers
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would be + verb(ing) in the future prediction sentences

Is it OK to use "would + be+ verb(ing)" construction when we talk about future projections or predictions. like in this example: Over the 50-year period or By 2067, people aged 15 to 59 would ...
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Is "get back" a phrasal verb in "I have to get back to work"?

For me, it sounds like it is. I would like to know your opinion though. In this sentence: "I have to get back to work.", 'get back' means to return. If I understand correctly when we pronounce phrasal ...
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What kind of phrasal verbs could be inverted to make an inverted sentence?

I'm learning the inverted sentences in English, actually I'm a new hand to this. There are one or two examples of inverted sentences in which the inverted parts are its phrasal verbs in my book. Away ...
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Please contact our office and we will arrange for a sales representative to call on you. (call on = visit)

Please contact our office and we will arrange for a sales representative to call on you. He will be glad to explain our terms, discount policies, and sales procedures. call on sb : visit Wonder why '...
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Does "up" act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
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3 answers
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The ETA to close (down) the task is the first of January - which version is grammatically sound?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically sound? The ETA to close the task is the first of January The ETA to close down the task is the first of January. What difference does it make if I ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is there any difference in meaning between "hang out with someone" and "hang around with someone"?

Could you tell if there is any difference in meaning between hang out with someone and hang around with someone? For example: Mike is always hanging out with that guy. Mike is always hanging around ...
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A verb phrase "[verb] up" meaning someone is easily buying whatever he sees on TV

I came across this phrase "[verb] up" twice on The Guardian Reader's comments section when readers were talking about someone tends to not raise much objection to whatever the person is told or ...
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238 views

Is there any difference between "talk over" and "talk through"?

Is there any difference between talk over and talk through? For example: I will have to talk my initiative over with the CEO. I will have to talk my initiative through with the CEO. In my ...
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What is the difference between "end up in" and "end in"?

Is there any difference in meaning between end up in and end in? For example: My attempt to cook chicken ended up in a complete mess. My attempt to cook chicken ended in a complete mess.
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4 answers
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Is "draw in electricity/energy" idiomatic?

I googled "the contact draws in electricity" and found 0 result, yet it seems something you would read in an engineering paper or journal. I couldn't find anything. Is there a more idiomatic way of ...
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Can 'to think' be an ordinary monotransitive verb?

(Per p 78, A Student's Introduction to English Grammar (2005), by Huddleston & Pullum) 'ordinary monotransitive' means this structure: Subject-Predicate-Direct Object-Predicative Complement. ...
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What "get onto" means in this context?

The following context comes from the movie "Clockwork Orange" by Stanley Kubrick Tramp Oh-hhh!!!! Go on, do me in you bastard cowards. I don't want to live anyway, not in a stinking world ...
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change vs. change up

She changed her daily routine. She changed up her daily routine. They say in U.S. informal English, 'up' is often added to 'change'. Could there be any difference in meaning between 'change' and '...
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she needs looking after vs she needs to be looked after

Put the verb into the correct form. My grandmother isn't able to look after herself any more. She needs _______ (look) after. Does "She needs looking after" and "She needs to be ...
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Construction: "Is also to do."

This is a construction that lingered in the back of my mind for my entire life. But for me "is to do" does not mean "has to do" as in: "Surely this is also to do with ...
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The phrasal verb "go off"

If a sound goes off, does it mean the sound starts or the sound starts and lasts for some time? In other words, can I say "an alarm was going off all night"?
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Is this the correct definition for the phrase "go on" in this context?

I'm watching a show and one of the characters is shopping with his wife and a kid when he is approached by two police officers and asked to go to talk with them somewhere in private. His wife asks him ...
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what does "blow off" mean in the girl who blew off PJ

This is from Good Luck Charlie. PJ met a girl Emma at the park for the first time. PJ had a big crush on her. Emma gave him her phone number. Later, by accident, PJ brought home the baby who had been ...
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Do you say "get away with <somebody>"?

From Definition of get away with phrasal verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary: get away with something ​1. to steal something and escape with it Thieves got away with computer ...
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Construction of phrasal verbs

I was thinking about how phrasal verbs are constructed. You take a verb and add a preposition to it. Like, Put off, Break up, Make out e.t.c. As a learner of English I kind of have to memorize them if ...
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"The meeting had been over by five o'clock"

There is the sentence from an Android English studying app: The meeting had been over by five o'clock. But I was told that this sentence is wrong. The correct sentences are The meeting had finished ...
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"Smash down on" when the meaning is not about a thing that breaks

I have some troubles with figuring out whether "smash down on" in the following sentences is the phrasal verb (smash down) or the regular verb "smash" + down on sth. A two-year-...
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the Phrasal Verbs ''RUN INTO'' + SB is used in english?

I've been checking out a lot time some lists of Phrasal Verbs and I've found this : run into run into run into another website 'I've checked out this phrasal verbs and I've been asking myself if this ...
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Is there a way to say a wheel split in half with a phrasal verb instead?

Is there a way to say a wheel split in half with a phrasal verb instead? The wheel split in half after some rock tore a hole on it. Is there a way to use for example "* off", but "...
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What is an appropriate verb to fit in all the three blanks of sentences?

Questions. Below are the three sentences with "xxx" indicating a blank. They often have blazing rows but they soon xxx over. These photographs are too small: why don't you xxx them up a bit?...
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to bite on, to work on, to stay on

Can you explain to me the usage of "on". Texts are: Chad felt dizzy when he saw the bones sticking through the skin. Dad coached him on how to pull his right forearm from the wrist and ...
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Is there a transitive phrasal verb for dance?

I am looking for a transitive phrasal verb that means "danced X dance" He spun out the Duck dance in front of everyone. I don't think spun out a dance is idiomatic. I am looking for ...
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"Type" or "type in" context

Could you tell me if I should use type or type in the sentence below? If need to know where our retail stores are located, you could just go to Google Maps and type/type in the name of out shops and ...
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Hold phrasal verb for “waiting until something happens”

I'm looking for the "hold" phrasal verb that means that I will stop doing something until something else is ready. John's report is input to my task so I will wait for that Would that be: ...
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tilted slippers?

They painted their lips and theirnails, they darkened their lashes and lightened their hair, and scent seemed to shimmer fromthem. They wore thin, bright dresses, tight aver their breasts and high on ...
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The correct way to say someone is interrupting as I'm doing something

Is there a phrasal verb/other shorter words for someone who suddenly appears and interrupts? For example: Just as I took the picture, a child appeared in front of the camera and blocked the people ...
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Is "Popped up" appropriate in this context?

The masked man started down an aisle of cubicles. As he reached the end of it and looked into the cubicle on his right, Lena popped up from a cubicle behind him and threw a computer screen at him, ...
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“Shirk” VS “Get out of doing something”

You have left the shop and didn’t care what would happen to your business just for having some fun and hanging out with those guys! We have bigger fishes to fry son. We must pay the installments back ...
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Confirmation please : Hold back people

Reading this article, there is a line, When I was elected governor in 2010, my biggest responsibility was to lead South Carolina out of the Great Recession. I knew that the most vulnerable families ...
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1 answer
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Is there any difference between "win out" and "win through"?

Could you tell me if there is any difference between the phrasal verb win out and win through. For example: The amount of work I had to do was overwhelming, but in the end I won out. The amount of ...
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Question about obligatory separation of phrasal verbs

I have seen a couple of phrasal verbs that must be separated. One of them is "ask in" verb. My question is how I can separate and put my long phrase between verb and particle. For example: I ...
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1 answer
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Is "pulled down" an appropriate phrasal verb to use here?

He angrily pulled down a big bookcase. Question: Is "pulled down" an appropriate phrasal verb to use here to mean he forcibly tipped over the bookcase?
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1 answer
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"Google up" meaning

Can I use the preposition up with the verb google? I found it only on Urban Dictionary which isn't a very reliable dictionary. Urban Dictionary: Google up Informal phrase used to describe performing ...
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Would any of these phrasal verbs seem odd to use in the context?

Would any of these phrasal verbs seem odd to use in this context? Also, which one is the best option according to you? The bank robber handed the stroller back to the female hostage, who then crying ...
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3 answers
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"Get around to" + infinitive/gerund?

I came across these sentences; I barely got around to listen to all of them lately. I didn't get around to posting on instagram. The second sentence is correct since Get around to takes the ...
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How do you tell when a phrasal verb ends with a preposition?

For example: I looked up the word in the dictionary. I understand that "up" isn't a preposition, but what is the procedure to determine whether a phrasal verb ends in a preposition?
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2 answers
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The rate we are going at, we won't be able to make it - Does the "at" in the end make the sentence incorrect?

The rate we are going at, we won't be able to make it. Does the "at" in the end make the sentence incorrect? I'm confused whether I can use the "at" or not.
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What kind of object is "people" in "He looks down on people"?

Is people in he looks down on people a direct object or an object of a preposition? I'm confused because looks down on is a phrasal verb, which should mean that on isn't a preposition.
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Is there any difference in meaning between between "hold the meeting off for tomorrow" and "hold the meeting over for tomorrow"?

Is there any difference in meaning between between hold the meeting off for tomorrow and hold the meeting over for tomorrow? For example: Something has come up, so let's hold the meeting off for ...
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0 answers
30 views

Need help with the phrasal verb "be through" and some prepositions

I was wondering if the the sentence below is grammatically correct especially the way the phrasal verb "be through" was used? Now that we are through on our discussion with nouns and verbs, ...
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1 answer
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Is there any difference in meaning beteen "hang on" and "hang in" in the sense of continuing despite difficulties?

Is there any difference in meaning between hang on and hang in in the sense of continuing despite difficulties? For example: The patient is in a coma. He's hanging in there. The patient is in a coma. ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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difference between go away for/on

Hello I'am wondering when do we use go away for and when do we use go away on because we say I am going away for a business why don't we say I am going away on business? is there any rule to know ...
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Is "bring sth/sb up to do sth" grammatically correct & often used?

I came across a phrase like this in a news article some time ago: I bring myself up to kiss her. I want to ask about the grammatical correctness of the sentence and the frequency of the phrase/...
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