Questions tagged [phrase-choice]

Is it Either? Is it Or? Is it Neither? Use the Phrase-Choice tag to help you complete the perfect sentence, say what you really mean, and learn new words and phrases.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
6 views

dare I say vs. I'm afraid

In the following two sentences: I'm afraid, I don't like fast food very much. Dare I say, Binge eating is prevalent among young people. Are "I'm afraid" and "Dare I say" both ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

What is the difference between “what is the good of?” and “what is the use of?”

My question is and I would like to know, is there any difference in the meaning between the sentences "what is the Good of?" and "What is the use of ?" In order to make this clear, ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Normally vs. in a normal way

If you want to attract attention, WRITE IN UPPER CASE; otherwise, write normally. If you want to attract attention, WRITE IN UPPER CASE; otherwise, write in a normal way. I don't understand which ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

What is the difference between “in a bit, shortly, soon” vs “later”?

When texting via Instant Messaging apps, what would be appropriate to say when we do not intend to respond to the other person? "in a bit, shortly, soon" vs "later" - The first ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How should I tell a period between two dates?

How should I tell a period between two dates? For example, The DVD contains data from April 2010 to July 2019. The DVD contains data from April 2010 until July 2019. The DVD contains data between ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Are the phrases “comes down to” and “boils down to” interchangeble?

I do get the meaning of the phrases separately, but I would like to know if they can be used interchangeably at least in some scenarios.
0
votes
0answers
9 views

“In which cases” vs “In what cases”

Which one of: In which cases In what cases is correct, more common when we want to ask a question about when something is the case?
0
votes
1answer
20 views

How to caution your opinion or judgement may sound biased in an idiomatic way?

I was talking with my friend about my brother. My friend was a bit critical of my brother because of something he did. "My brother is one of the finest people", I told my friend. How can I ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

confusion in usage of “as for myself”

I'm confused with the usage of as for myself. Whether it is used to tell something about our personal life or to tell our opinion/thinking? Consider this: As for myself, I was always a self-occupied ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

To put something out of order unintentionally

What verbs would you use to convey the idea of someone having broken/putting something out of order. My car won't start! You /broke it/broke it down/put it out of order/ruined. My computer doesn't ...
0
votes
3answers
42 views

Used to have or had?

What is the difference between: I didn't use to have a phone AND I didn't have a phone Maybe the first option is not correct at all? I will be grateful for explanation :).
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Is there any difference in implied nuances between “make every effort” and “make all efforts”?

Some dictionaries like Merriam-Webster and The Freedictionary.com define the phrase "make every effort" in them while no dictionaries, including the two, have "make all efforts" in ...
0
votes
3answers
44 views

Is it correct to say “use a pair of scales to weigh the products” or “use a scales to weigh the products”?

I you look at "scales", you see just a whole piece (see the above picture), it's not like a pair of scissors. Probably, in the past, the scales has 2 pieces like these But nowadays, in ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

My car (has broken or broke) down, so I have to call a mechanic at once

My car (has broken or broke) down, so I have to call a mechanic at once. Should I use the Present Perfect or the Past Simple in this situation? I think the Present Perfect is more suitable because ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

In layman's terms vs. simply put

In the following sentence: Simply put, the impacts of global warming are going to be more evident in not-too-distant future. Can I use In layman's terms instead of simply put? In layman's terms, ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Should I use “do it” or “do so” in the following example?

I found a good explanation here. Basically, you use "do it" when you are referring to a noun and "do so" when you are referring to an action or clause. So by this logic, the ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

Are there any differences between “give someone a helping hand” and “give someone a hand”?

These are from the dictionary a helping hand help and support give/lend/offer etc somebody a helping hand She’s been giving me a helping hand with the children. give (somebody) a hand spoken to help ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Why is “personal reasons” always plural?

Why is the phrase "personal reasons" is preferred to "personal reason"? Example: I'm on leave due to personal reasons. I hardly have seen anyone saying "I'm on leave due to a ...
0
votes
1answer
114 views

“between A and B” vs “between A or B”

The following is the headline of an article from ClutchPoints, sports news web site. Matt Nagy speaks out on making the call between Mitchell Trubisky or Nick Foles While the phrase "between A ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

Keep your distance other options

Do all of these sound natural? "Keep distance." "Keep a safe distance." "Keep social distance." "Keep two meters distance." "Keep a two-meter distance.&...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Do we use “into” or “onto”, for example, “put the slide into/onto the platform” when there is only 10% of the slide getting in?

There is a high platform and a slide, and to join them together we have to put the tiny sticking-out bit of the slide into the hole of the platform as shown in the picture. That tiny bit occupies ...
0
votes
3answers
35 views

What are the differences between “No running” and “Don't run”?

A boy is running in a small room and some native speakers command "No running", not "don't run". When do we say "no running, no talking" and when saying "don't run&...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Which one is correct “Please close the door. I am in a draught” or “I am in draughts”?

This is very confusing. "Wind" can countable or uncountable, but "Draught" is only a countable noun. So, when I am sitting in my house, probably there are many draughts or many ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Do we say “my house is very far from your house” or “my house is a very long way from your house”?

The dictionary say we use "far from" in negative sentences and "a long way" in positive sentences. In everyday English, far is usually only used in negative sentences (it’s not ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Is it natural and correct to say “sugary foods give me acne”?

Is it natural and correct to say sugary food gives me acne? For example: Sugary foods give me acne, so I try to steer clear of them. If it sounds off, would it be more natural to say the following? ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Is it natural to say “You made your mom bleed”, “You made your mom bleeding”, “… mom being bleeding” or “…mom have bled”?

Mom was holding a glass bowl feeding son when he knocked it away, the bowl broke and a fragment of the glass cut her finger. Is it natural to say: "You made your mom bleed" ( because we say ...
2
votes
1answer
31 views

Do we often use command forms for verbs that used for accidental situations, for example, “don't spill water”, “don't bump into objects”?

When we command somebody to do something, we told him not to do things on purpose. Verbs such as "spill" or "bump" are often used in accidental situations. Can we use these verbs ...
2
votes
3answers
69 views

Confused with the word “bottom”. Do we say “he is wearing a pair of pajama bottoms” or “he is wearing a pajama bottom”?

In the dictionary Bottom 5 [count] : a piece of clothing that is worn on the lower part of the body a bikini bottom — often plural pajama bottoms So, "a bikini bottom" should look like &...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Do we say “He littered candy wrappers all over the floor” or “He littered the floor with candy wrapper”?

litter [transitive, usually passive, intransitive] to leave things in a place, making it look untidy be littered with something The floor was littered with papers. He was arrested for littering. It ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is it correct to say “a bigger brother should concede a bigger piece of cake to his younger brother” in everyday English?

I know that in Western culture, when there is a cake, mom will cut it in half and give them to her 2 sons each. So, the big brother will get one and the little brother will get one. But in other ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

“Do not use X if A, B, or C is sufficient”

Do not use X if A, B, or C is sufficient. Do not use X if either A, B, or C is sufficient. X, A, B, and C are nouns. The reader have a choice to use either A, B, C (the exact choice depends on the ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

“Better keep” vs “Better to keep.”

Which one is correct (when it comes at the beginning of the sentence)? I searched on this website, and I found both instances: Better keep a close eye on it to make sure it doesn't take over. Better ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Do we use the adverbs “a lot” and “much” with countable actions, for example, “you rubbed your eyes a lot/too much”?

We often say "you talk a lot" or "you talk too much". Do we use the adverbs "a lot" and "much" with countable actions, for example, "you rubbed your eyes a ...
0
votes
3answers
193 views

What makes the phrase “to be continued.” so idiomatic?

The phrase "to be continued" is a kind of set phrase we often see at the end of part of a story, a television show etc., and I believe it is an abbreviation for "The story (or the show ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

“Building of [ noun ]” vs “Building [ noun ]”

I was asked by one of my coworkers if there is a difference between "Building of human relationships" and "Building human relationships". I couldn't find any discussion on this ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Can a phrase be a part of a clause?

I want to know if a phrase can be a part of a clause. For instance : Atul did not come to the class yesterday. Did come is verb phrase in this sentence. But Atul did not come is a clause because it ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Does the phrase “a dragging experience” make any sense?

I am trying to come up with a pun for a specific situation. In a playground, there is a kid sitting down at the edge of a merry-go-round with his legs sticking out touching the ground. While it spins ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Throws himself down on

Context: Derek is standing on the top of a scaffold when a man starts shooting at him. Derek doesn't get hit. Derek throws himself down on the scaffold as the man keeps shooting. Derek throws ...
2
votes
2answers
33 views

“The daily life of my cats” ? or “My cats' daily life”?

I'm making a webcomic about my cats, I'm ready to publish it, but I have a huge doubt regarding the title. Because, according to Google Translate (yes, I know, it's not the best reference...) both of ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

What verb, phrase or phrasal verb do you use when you are waving your hand to scare off or kill a fly? [duplicate]

What verb, phrase or phrasal verb do you use when you are waving your hand to scare off or kill a fly? Can I say swat at? For example: I swatted at a fly for hours with no success. I am sure there ...
0
votes
1answer
136 views

“save the date” vs “safe the date”

I sometimes see "safe the date" on webpages. I always thought it was "save the date" as in "saving the date to a calendar". Also, there is no verb safe. Using "safe ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

to be or to become

These are images from Onizuka manga. I don't know what is the difference between "going to be" and "going to become". I would appreciate it someone can tell me which one is the ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“tens of thousands of people” vs. “tens of thousands people”

I often confuse the two phrases. My Google search for them has shown that the use of "tens of thousands of people" is overwhelmingly popular compared to "tens of thousands people". ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Is it correct to say, “this chair is made to sit on, not to lay on” and “this chair is for sitting on, not lying on”?

Which of the followings are correct: -This chair is made to sit on, not lie on. -This chair is made to be sat on, not lain on. -This chair is for sitting on, not lying on. -This chair is for being ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Is it natural and correct to say “talk via audio” meaning to actually talk to someone over the phone rather than text?

Is it natural and correct to say talk via audio meaning to actually talk to someone over the phone rather than text? For example: Do you prefer to talk via text or audio? If it sounds off, would it ...
2
votes
2answers
25 views

Should I use “nag” or “nag at” in the following example?

I'm confused about the difference between the two. I know that "nag at" can refer to a problem that's nagging at you. How about in this example? One day, I nagged (at) you, and you snapped.
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Are they interchangeable, “it's not the time to watch the match” and “the match hasn't started yet”?

The match starts at 5 pm and you turned your TV on at 4:45 pm. And you said "it's not the time to watch the match" (the same way you say "it's not time to have dinner") or "...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Do we say “untie the rubber band off the neck of the balloon” or “untie the rubber band from around the neck of the balloon”?

Which of the following pairs are correct (see the above picture) "put the rubber band on the neck of the balloon" vs "take the rubber band off the neck of the balloon" "tie ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Is the phrase “let happen whatever may” valid and correct in the sense of leaving something to chance?

Is the phrase let happen whatever may valid and correct in the sense of leaving something to chance For example: I have not idea what is going to come up in the exam. I have no time to prepare, so ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Do you say “She has been closing her eyes for 1 hour” or “Her eyes have been closed for 1 hour”?

Is "to close her eyes" a one-off action or a prolong one? I think there are some verbs used to express some actions that can not be prolonged. For example, "I have been finishing the ...

1
2 3 4 5
12