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Questions tagged [phrase-choice]

Is it Either? Is it Or? Is it Neither? Use the Phrase-Choice tag to help you complete the perfect sentence, say what you really mean, and learn new words and phrases.

-1
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1answer
17 views

what is the defference between 'I don't have anything' and 'I have nothing'

I don't have anything. I have nothing. What is the differnece between them? I wanna know the nuance, because to me they just look the same.
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Meaning of “He may not come today”?

I suppose that He may not come today means that he is not allowed to come today. Right? But what is the right way to say that he is allowed not to come today? He may not to come today Is that ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

Is this question “If we can't write a unit test then what is the closest solution?” grammatical?

I'd like to know whether the question If we can't write a unit test then what is the closest solution? grammatical? Does it sound natural or may be you would ask that kind of a question some ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

“the world over” vs “all over the world”

I have seen many writers use "the world over" to mean something is happening all over the world. Is not it more appropriate to use "all over the world" instead? "the world over" sounds like a twisted ...
1
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2answers
20 views

How to say in English that someone is aggressive and that aggression is pointed at someone?

What is the most natural way to say that someone is aggressive and that aggression is pointed at someone? Is any of the following options correct and natural? Kate is aggressive to/towards her Mom ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Taking one approach over [another/the other]?

Which sentence is correct? To what extent, taking one approach over the other, can... Or To what extent, taking one approach over another, can...
0
votes
2answers
15 views

The use of the adjective “narrow” as an adverb

Tell me please if the following use of the adjective is correct. You hands are too far apart. Grab the bar narrower and chin up. What I want to communicate is hands being closer together is better....
0
votes
3answers
25 views

‘Whether or not’ VS ‘whether’

He wants to know whether we want dinner. He wants to know whether or not we want dinner. What is the difference between two sentences above?
1
vote
1answer
19 views

purposeful VS motivated

Let's suppose someone has a goal and they work on achieving that goal. Would it be idiomatic to say: He is purposeful. He is motivated. Do these two phrases mean the same? If they don't, ...
3
votes
1answer
13 views

Is “to reach more” idiomatic?

Let's suppose someone's goal is to get a better job, better salary and so on. Would it be idiomatic for them to say: I want to reach more than I have now.
2
votes
1answer
33 views

Do “usually never” and “usually always” make sense?

When visiting the lunch buffet: "I usually never take the spicy dressing" When waiting for Tom: "Tom usually always comes on time" It seems like a bit of colloquial exaggeration - but is it ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

Are “could” and “would be able to” always interchangeable?

Example sentence: At first, I thought of writing a note. But then I figured that with a recording, you could/would be able to lie down and close your eyes. Maybe I'm wrong but could sounds more "...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

to estimate time and labor efforts for a task completion

Could you please tell me whether the selected sentence Ability to estimate time and labor efforts for a task completion sounds natural? I don't want it to sound informal, instead I want it to be ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

The film will already be started by the time we get to the cinema [closed]

Could you please tell me whether the selected sentence We are late. The film will already be started by the time we get to the cinema. is grammatically correct?
0
votes
1answer
17 views

experiment data vs experimental data vs testing data

As said like the title, this question haunted me for a long time, I would usually use the phrase experimental data, but I have ever been told experiment data has the identical meaning when referring ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

“No doubt he ..” or “There is no doubt (that) he …”; are both grammatical?

No doubt he will pass the examination. There is no doubt (that) he will pass the examination. Is the first way, "No doubt he", grammatical? The second, of course is grammatical! What's the ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

“Stay hungry” or “Keep hungry”?

If I had two choices, either to "Eat something" or "Stay/Keep hungry", when food is offered to me when I was in a state of hunger. I want the phrase to be in the same format as "Eat something", I ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Proper terminology for the edition and version/printing of a book

On the inside of the cover of a typical book you'll find the small print about the book. Stuff like copyright notices, place of print, authors, editors and alike. Also, you'll find information about ...
0
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1answer
19 views

Does “I've got the following macro in the code” sound OK?

I wrote a question a few days ago starting like this: I've got the following macro in the code: I was meaning the code of a whole program. I also provided the code of the macro (kind of a function ...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

“On the minute” vs “after a minute”

Tell me please if there is any difference in meaning in the following context. After you complete the excercise, you can do it again on the minute/after a minute.
0
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2answers
42 views

“about the latter times”

Situation: the student is asking about the possibility of having the next lesson with his teacher at 8:00 instead of usual 8:30. Teacher is answering: "This Friday, 8:00 is fine. Not sure, though, ...
0
votes
2answers
19 views

“doing something on command” or doing something after one's command"?

Tell me please which is the correct and natural way to say that someone wants someone to do things only after the person tells that person to do the things. Here is the context: Do not do anything ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

This is going to be my chance to [verb] any difficulties. Solve or sort out?

The sentence This is going to be my chance to _____ any difficulties. is from an English test. Possible answers include: "solve", "sort out". And an examinee have to choose ONLY one right answer. ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

I don't think VS I don't suppose

Could you please tell me whether the phrase "I don't suppose [something]" is idiomatic? If it is then what is the difference between: I don't think [something] I don't suppose [something]
0
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2answers
35 views

You're all ignoring the fact VS You all are ignoring the fact

Which one is correct? You're all ignoring the fact [that ...] You all are ignoring the fact [that ...]
3
votes
1answer
44 views

“you have ordered” vs “you ordered”

Why does the author prefer to use present perfect in this case? I have included all the records you have ordered Why not ordered as the two orders were made quite a long time ago (6 months and 8 ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Best X and Y vs. Best X and Best Y

Came across a place with the name Best Bagel and Coffee. This naturally brought up a debate on the following, does "Best X and Y" mean: We have the best X AND best Y We have the best X, and also we ...
13
votes
2answers
4k views

Sorry, I haven't seen your letter

I'm waiting for an email answer from another person. And then I'm writing to him a question asking whether he is going to answer: Me: Are you going to answer? Person: I've answered to you ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

How to express an increase in sth during some years?

I want to express an increase in annual sales of my company from 2013 to 2018. I have written the following sentence. I don't know why, but I feel that it's somehow strange, isn't it? If so, any ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

What's the difference between “a contract with” and “a contract from”?

What is the difference between "a contract with" and "a contract from"? For example, in the sentence SpaceX has a $1.6 billion contract from NASA. Can I replace "from" by "with" in this sentence? ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“Get to know” usage

Can I use this phrase for complete strangers? For example, my friend and I are sitting at the table in a coffee shop. There is a girl sitting at another table. I want to come to her, introduce myself ...
0
votes
2answers
698 views

“These kinds of” or “these kind of”? [duplicate]

I'm using a grammar checking service. It tells me these kind of projects is wrong and should be changed to these kinds of projects. I'm not sure about the correctness of this suggestion, so I googled ...
0
votes
1answer
178 views

“To repair something” vs “To get something repaired”

How is the phrase “Get the car repaired” different from “Repair the car”? Is there a difference? If so, how do I use this? For example:
1
vote
1answer
102 views

“To kill someone” vs “To have someone killed”

In a movie, I’ve heard “Are you going to have me killed?” How’s this different from “Are you going to kill me?” Is there a certain rule for that? If you’re wondering where I heard this, it was ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

“Choice tonight” vs “choice for tonight.”

Do they mean different things? Or they are the same? Example sentence: Tom's choice (for) tonight is chicken salad. My theory is that "for" indicates that there's an object and without "for" the ...
4
votes
3answers
710 views

“worthy of mention(ing)” or “worthy of a mention(ing)”?

That kind of happening would have definitely been worthy of mention. or That kind of happening would have definitely been worthy of a mention. or That kind of happening would have definitely ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

“not a smallest response” or “not the smallest response”?

You've asked a question on .stack and don't get an answer for 5 straight days. So you say, "Is my question that hard? 5 days and not the smallest response!" Or should it be "...and not a smallest ...
0
votes
2answers
80 views

“You did? vs ”you did so?"

In which situations should I use the former and the latter? Or maybe the two mean the same (and maybe the "so" is redundant)? Example sentence: Since you have low self-esteem he knew you'd be with ...
0
votes
1answer
334 views

Should [verb] vs should be [verb + -ing]

Do they mean the same? Or have slightly different meanings?' Example sentence: Sorry, I'm rambling. We should focus/be focusing on the topic: your life. Does this sentence change if the pick one ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

“To save for something” vs “to save up for something”

Both sentences have the same number of hits on Google: save for my studies save up for my studies So I'm curious, then what's the difference? Or there's no difference at all? Example sentence: ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

“these clues four” VS “these four clues” [closed]

Choose, unless you wish to stay here forevermore To help you in your choice, we give you these clues four First, however slyly the poison tries to hide You will always find some on nettle wine'...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

“Speeding time up” vs “speeding up time.”

There are other examples, like "bringing up the topic" vs "bringing the topic up." What's the difference? Example sentence: She wished she could speed up time/speed time up. speed up time speed ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

For all times or for all ages?

In Russian where is a fixed phrase "для всех времен" it can be translated as "for all time", "for all times" but actually it describes that something has a timeless value. It seems to me, that this ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it OK to say: in a response to?

Suppose I am writing an email and I need a customer to send some information. I want to tell him to reply my email and send the data. Please send us the required information in a response to this ...
1
vote
2answers
300 views

“Inherent in” vs “inherent to.”

I thought the phrase was "inherent in," but then I found out that inherent to is also used. Do they mean the same thing? Or they have slightly different meanings? Example sentence: They shared ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

“I would have done X if Y would Z” or “I would have done X if Y would have Z”?

What's the correct construction? Example sentence: "I ate the goldfish," I would have confessed if those words wouldn't sound crazy. "I ate the goldfish," I would have confessed if those ...
0
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2answers
22 views

“Whole evenings doing X vs ”whole evenings of doing X."

Are the two the same? Or they have different meanings? Example: It used to be worse; whole evenings crying and yelling. It used to be worse; whole evenings of crying and yelling. I used to ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

-based with a two-word term

There is a technology called Spring Boot. I am describing a process built on this framework. I want to say an approach based on Spring Boot but rephrase it by using an adjective with the suffix -...
0
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2answers
29 views

out of commission

I would like to ask the difference between the "out of commission" and "out of order" in terms of meaning and usage. Are they different in terms of formality? An elevator, an ATM machine or a ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

“grip the bar closely” or “grip the bar with your hand close to each other”?

Tell me please what is the most natuaral way to say that I want someone to grab a barbell with hands close to each. Here are exaples: Grip the bar closely to activate your triceps before doing a ...