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Questions tagged [phrase-choice]

Is it Either? Is it Or? Is it Neither? Use the Phrase-Choice tag to help you complete the perfect sentence, say what you really mean, and learn new words and phrases.

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1answer
18 views

“No doubt he ..” or “There is no doubt (that) he …”; are both grammatical?

No doubt he will pass the examination. There is no doubt (that) he will pass the examination. Is the first way, "No doubt he", grammatical? The second, of course is grammatical! What's the ...
4
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5answers
1k views

“Stay hungry” or “Keep hungry”?

If I had two choices, either to "Eat something" or "Stay/Keep hungry", when food is offered to me when I was in a state of hunger. I want the phrase to be in the same format as "Eat something", I ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

Proper terminology for the edition and version/printing of a book

On the inside of the cover of a typical book you'll find the small print about the book. Stuff like copyright notices, place of print, authors, editors and alike. Also, you'll find information about ...
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1answer
17 views

Does “I've got the following macro in the code” sound OK?

I wrote a question a few days ago starting like this: I've got the following macro in the code: I was meaning the code of a whole program. I also provided the code of the macro (kind of a function ...
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2answers
22 views

“On the minute” vs “after a minute”

Tell me please if there is any difference in meaning in the following context. After you complete the excercise, you can do it again on the minute/after a minute.
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2answers
38 views

“about the latter times”

Situation: the student is asking about the possibility of having the next lesson with his teacher at 8:00 instead of usual 8:30. Teacher is answering: "This Friday, 8:00 is fine. Not sure, though, ...
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2answers
15 views

“doing something on command” or doing something after one's command"?

Tell me please which is the correct and natural way to say that someone wants someone to do things only after the person tells that person to do the things. Here is the context: Do not do anything ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

This is going to be my chance to [verb] any difficulties. Solve or sort out?

The sentence This is going to be my chance to _____ any difficulties. is from an English test. Possible answers include: "solve", "sort out". And an examinee have to choose ONLY one right answer. ...
2
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1answer
41 views

I don't think VS I don't suppose

Could you please tell me whether the phrase "I don't suppose [something]" is idiomatic? If it is then what is the difference between: I don't think [something] I don't suppose [something]
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2answers
32 views

You're all ignoring the fact VS You all are ignoring the fact

Which one is correct? You're all ignoring the fact [that ...] You all are ignoring the fact [that ...]
3
votes
1answer
43 views

“you have ordered” vs “you ordered”

Why does the author prefer to use present perfect in this case? I have included all the records you have ordered Why not ordered as the two orders were made quite a long time ago (6 months and 8 ...
1
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1answer
29 views

Best X and Y vs. Best X and Best Y

Came across a place with the name Best Bagel and Coffee. This naturally brought up a debate on the following, does "Best X and Y" mean: We have the best X AND best Y We have the best X, and also we ...
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2answers
4k views

Sorry, I haven't seen your letter

I'm waiting for an email answer from another person. And then I'm writing to him a question asking whether he is going to answer: Me: Are you going to answer? Person: I've answered to you ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

How to express an increase in sth during some years?

I want to express an increase in annual sales of my company from 2013 to 2018. I have written the following sentence. I don't know why, but I feel that it's somehow strange, isn't it? If so, any ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

What's the difference between “a contract with” and “a contract from”?

What is the difference between "a contract with" and "a contract from"? For example, in the sentence SpaceX has a $1.6 billion contract from NASA. Can I replace "from" by "with" in this sentence? ...
0
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1answer
30 views

“Get to know” usage

Can I use this phrase for complete strangers? For example, my friend and I are sitting at the table in a coffee shop. There is a girl sitting at another table. I want to come to her, introduce myself ...
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2answers
213 views

“These kinds of” or “these kind of”? [duplicate]

I'm using a grammar checking service. It tells me these kind of projects is wrong and should be changed to these kinds of projects. I'm not sure about the correctness of this suggestion, so I googled ...
0
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1answer
75 views

“To repair something” vs “To get something repaired”

How is the phrase “Get the car repaired” different from “Repair the car”? Is there a difference? If so, how do I use this? For example:
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vote
1answer
94 views

“To kill someone” vs “To have someone killed”

In a movie, I’ve heard “Are you going to have me killed?” How’s this different from “Are you going to kill me?” Is there a certain rule for that? If you’re wondering where I heard this, it was ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

“Choice tonight” vs “choice for tonight.”

Do they mean different things? Or they are the same? Example sentence: Tom's choice (for) tonight is chicken salad. My theory is that "for" indicates that there's an object and without "for" the ...
4
votes
3answers
510 views

“worthy of mention(ing)” or “worthy of a mention(ing)”?

That kind of happening would have definitely been worthy of mention. or That kind of happening would have definitely been worthy of a mention. or That kind of happening would have definitely ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

“not a smallest response” or “not the smallest response”?

You've asked a question on .stack and don't get an answer for 5 straight days. So you say, "Is my question that hard? 5 days and not the smallest response!" Or should it be "...and not a smallest ...
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2answers
32 views

“You did? vs ”you did so?"

In which situations should I use the former and the latter? Or maybe the two mean the same (and maybe the "so" is redundant)? Example sentence: Since you have low self-esteem he knew you'd be with ...
0
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1answer
165 views

Should [verb] vs should be [verb + -ing]

Do they mean the same? Or have slightly different meanings?' Example sentence: Sorry, I'm rambling. We should focus/be focusing on the topic: your life. Does this sentence change if the pick one ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

“To save for something” vs “to save up for something”

Both sentences have the same number of hits on Google: save for my studies save up for my studies So I'm curious, then what's the difference? Or there's no difference at all? Example sentence: ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

“these clues four” VS “these four clues” [closed]

Choose, unless you wish to stay here forevermore To help you in your choice, we give you these clues four First, however slyly the poison tries to hide You will always find some on nettle wine'...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

“Speeding time up” vs “speeding up time.”

There are other examples, like "bringing up the topic" vs "bringing the topic up." What's the difference? Example sentence: She wished she could speed up time/speed time up. speed up time speed ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

For all times or for all ages?

In Russian where is a fixed phrase "для всех времен" it can be translated as "for all time", "for all times" but actually it describes that something has a timeless value. It seems to me, that this ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it OK to say: in a response to?

Suppose I am writing an email and I need a customer to send some information. I want to tell him to reply my email and send the data. Please send us the required information in a response to this ...
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vote
2answers
99 views

“Inherent in” vs “inherent to.”

I thought the phrase was "inherent in," but then I found out that inherent to is also used. Do they mean the same thing? Or they have slightly different meanings? Example sentence: They shared ...
0
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2answers
34 views

“I would have done X if Y would Z” or “I would have done X if Y would have Z”?

What's the correct construction? Example sentence: "I ate the goldfish," I would have confessed if those words wouldn't sound crazy. "I ate the goldfish," I would have confessed if those ...
0
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2answers
22 views

“Whole evenings doing X vs ”whole evenings of doing X."

Are the two the same? Or they have different meanings? Example: It used to be worse; whole evenings crying and yelling. It used to be worse; whole evenings of crying and yelling. I used to ...
0
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2answers
25 views

-based with a two-word term

There is a technology called Spring Boot. I am describing a process built on this framework. I want to say an approach based on Spring Boot but rephrase it by using an adjective with the suffix -...
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2answers
26 views

out of commission

I would like to ask the difference between the "out of commission" and "out of order" in terms of meaning and usage. Are they different in terms of formality? An elevator, an ATM machine or a ...
0
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2answers
30 views

“grip the bar closely” or “grip the bar with your hand close to each other”?

Tell me please what is the most natuaral way to say that I want someone to grab a barbell with hands close to each. Here are exaples: Grip the bar closely to activate your triceps before doing a ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

“Cut back/down my shifts” or “cut back/down on my shifts”?

I'm confused because I see the two versions on Google Books: "cut back/down my shifts" "cut back/down on my shifts" What's the correct alternative? Or they are both correct?
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2answers
100 views

“no tests have been done” or “no test has been done”?

Should I say "no tests have been done" or "no test has been done" in case when only one test could possibly be done? For example, in the case of a director who entered an empty classroom where a ...
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2answers
71 views

How to describe a person's effort to keep a conversation up and smooth?

How to describe a person's effort to keep a conversation up and smooth? Would adjective "communicable" fit the bill? For example: People in Feriah are not as well-communicable as the ones from Dumba....
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Can I put “it's” before “no wonder” when I make a kind of conclusion?

Can I put "it's" before "no wonder" when I make a kind of conclusion (having presented some facts about why my conclusion shouldn't be surprising)? Or it will sound awkward?: James studied karate ...
2
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1answer
13 views

Is “as she insisted her name was” okay?

Everybody knew that her real name was Merry, but she kept telling everyone that her name was Mariot. Now, 176 years later, I am writing memoirs and mention her in them: "Merry (or Mariot, as she ...
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3answers
3k views

Stubbed my toe… which preposition?

How to say table was the thing I kicked into using stub? Is it one of these? A. I stubbed my toe by the table? B. I stubbed my toe onto the table?
1
vote
1answer
21 views

“Comes at a very big price” or “comes at a very big effort”?

"Comes at a very big price" or "comes at a very big effort"? Which one is better for describing an action that is really hard for someone to perform? For example: He seems to have a problem ...
8
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2answers
1k views

“To make space” or “to make a space”?

Which is correct/sounds more natural? Example sentence: He tries to make (a) space by shoving my bag away. I found both options on Google.
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2answers
42 views

“Blurt to” vs “blurt at.”

What the correct option, or maybe both are correct? I'm confused because I got more or less the same number of Google Book results for each of them: he blurted at her. he blurted to her.
0
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1answer
33 views

Is “as a sign of their mutual consent” idiomatic?

Is "as a sign of their mutual consent" idiomatic? As a sign of their mutual consent, the two scientists exchanged their ink pens. or should it be re-phrased somehow? EDIT: My concern: 1) I am ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Who is this vs who is calling-telephone

What is the difference between "who is this?" and "who is calling?" when we answer to the telephone? Is the second one more polite than the first one? Lastly, is there any difference between AmE and ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Replacing “under the Sun” with “under the Moon”

Can "under the Sun" (meaning "in this world") be replaced with "under the Moon", especially when it's about love between to young lovers, or will it be completely obscure in English? For example, ...
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2answers
60 views

Different usage with “dinner”

Is there a difference if we use the noun "dinner", the phrase "to have dinner" or the verb "to dinner"?: Are you going for dinner with us? Are you going to have dinner with us? Are you going to ...
0
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1answer
140 views

What is the meaning of 'a little too + adjective'? [duplicate]

What is the meaning of the phrase "a little too + adjective" ? For example: This is a little too hard for me. Does it mean same as: This is slightly hard for me. ? How are the following ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Is it okay to say “the light is shining twice brightly”?

Is it okay to say "Now the light is shining twice brightly"? While Google Word gives multiple results for "twice brightly" (there is even a novel with such name, it surprisingly gives only one result ...