Questions tagged [phrase-choice]

Is it Either? Is it Or? Is it Neither? Use the Phrase-Choice tag to help you complete the perfect sentence, say what you really mean, and learn new words and phrases.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
6 views

What verb, phrase or phrasal verb do you use when you are waving your hand to scare off or kill a fly?

What verb, phrase or phrasal verb do you use when you are waving your hand to scare off or kill a fly? Can I say swat at? For example: I swatted at a fly for hours with no success.
0
votes
0answers
14 views

“save the date” vs “safe the date”

I sometimes see "safe the date" on webpages. I always thought it was "save the date" as in "saving the date to a calendar". Also, there is no verb safe. Using "safe ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

to be or to become

These are images from Onizuka manga. I don't know what is the difference between "going to be" and "going to become". I would appreciate it someone can tell me which one is the ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“tens of thousands of people” vs. “tens of thousands people”

I often confuse the two phrases. My Google search for them has shown that the use of "tens of thousands of people" is overwhelmingly popular compared to "tens of thousands people". ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Is it correct to say, “this chair is made to sit on, not to lay on” and “this chair is for sitting on, not lying on”?

Which of the followings are correct: -This chair is made to sit on, not lie on. -This chair is made to be sat on, not lain on. -This chair is for sitting on, not lying on. -This chair is for being ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

Is it natural and correct to say “talk via audio” meaning to actually talk to someone over the phone rather than text?

Is it natural and correct to say talk via audio meaning to actually talk to someone over the phone rather than text? For example: Do you prefer to talk via text or audio? If it sounds off, would it ...
2
votes
2answers
20 views

Should I use “nag” or “nag at” in the following example?

I'm confused about the difference between the two. I know that "nag at" can refer to a problem that's nagging at you. How about in this example? One day, I nagged (at) you, and you snapped.
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Are they interchangeable, “it's not the time to watch the match” and “the match hasn't started yet”?

The match starts at 5 pm and you turned your TV on at 4:45 pm. And you said "it's not the time to watch the match" (the same way you say "it's not time to have dinner") or "...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Do we say “untie the rubber band off the neck of the balloon” or “untie the rubber band from around the neck of the balloon”?

Which of the following pairs are correct (see the above picture) "put the rubber band on the neck of the balloon" vs "take the rubber band off the neck of the balloon" "tie ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Is the phrase “let happen whatever may” valid and correct in the sense of leaving something to chance?

Is the phrase let happen whatever may valid and correct in the sense of leaving something to chance For example: I have not idea what is going to come up in the exam. I have no time to prepare, so ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Do you say “She has been closing her eyes for 1 hour” or “Her eyes have been closed for 1 hour”?

Is "to close her eyes" a one-off action or a prolong one? I think there are some verbs used to express some actions that can not be prolonged. For example, "I have been finishing the ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is it correct to say “Climb the other way!” or “Climb the other way round!” or “Go to the other side and climb!”?

There is a climbing structure for children to play as shown in the picture. There are 2 flights of stairs and children can climb either side. The boy is standing on one side and you want him to go to ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Is it correct and natural to use the question “how could you have done it?” when expressing disbelief or surprise?

Is it correcr natural to use the question how could you have done it? when expressing disbelief or surprise? For example: So you are saying you made it. How could you have done it? You can't even ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What does “like someone for someone” mean? [duplicate]

I have come across it in the 9th episode of the 10th season of Friends. Here is the contex: Chandler: Monica, I want a baby too, but this woman is giving away her child. She deserves to know who it's ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

“The girl with a rubber band ‘on’ OR ‘in’ her hair”?

A girl tied her hair with a rubber band as shown in the picture. Is it correct to say "She is the girl with a rubber band on/in her hair"? Some native speakers says "in", others ...
1
vote
2answers
21 views

Is phrase “for the love of design” correct?

I have a question regarding phrase "for the love of design" Is it gramatic/semantically correct? I want to use this phrase as engraving on some project and it's supposed meaning is to be &...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Is it correct and natural to say “get one's life set” meaning to become successful and financially secure?

Is it correct and natural to say get one's life set meaning to become successful and financially secure? For example: Not that you got your life set, have you thought of going on a round-the-world ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

“Research Estimate” or “Estimate Research”

My friend and I got into a small argument about which is the grammatically correct way to name the file of our estimation for how long it would take to research something, I tell him that it should be ...
1
vote
3answers
43 views

“I joined a dance class” vs “I signed up for a dance class”

Which one of these sentences is correct when I want to mean I registered for a class? Or can either of them be used interchangeably? I joined a dance class. I signed up for a dance class.
1
vote
1answer
19 views

“Someone of the opposite gender” vs “Someone from the opposite gender”

Which one of these two structures is correct? Or can they be used interchangeably? "Someone of the opposite gender" "Someone from the opposite gender" What I try to mean by ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Is it correct to say “the Lego got broken apart”?

You're holding a Lego as shown in the above picture. But because the Lego is of poor quality, the blocks did not stick together and while you were holding the Lego, somehow it got separated as shown ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Would you say “Put the balloon on the stick” or “Put the balloon in the stick”?

A child can hold a balloon by its stick. The stick has 2 parts: a straight stick and a conical piece. The straight stick is put into the conical piece. The conical piece has a gap or slot where you ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is it natural and correct to say “let's introduce to each other”?

Is it natural and correct to say let's introduce to each other? For example: I am your new teacher so let's introduce to each other. Would it be better to say I am your new teacher so let's ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

You told a child that the boy's about to jump into the pool. Now, the boy has just jumped into it. Is it ok to say “there he goes” or “there you go”? [duplicate]

You and your child are watching a boy standing by the pool. You told your child that you expected the boy to jump into the pool in a few minutes. Now, the boy has just jumped into it. Is it okay to ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is “discover him from another side” idiomatic?

Is it okay to say "to discover a person from another side" meaning "to find out something new about a person"? Google returns zero results for "discover him from another side&...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Fewer people in the streets vs. fewer people on the streets [duplicate]

What's the correct or at least the most common option? Someone told me that "in the streets" means being literately in the middle of the street. On the streets means on the sides of the ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

How do you describe the situation where a person walks into tree twigs and the person following gets hit by them?

What phrase or verb do you use to describe the situation where a person walks into tree twigs and the person following gets hit by them?
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What are the differences between “I fell off / out / down / over / in”? [closed]

What are the differences between "I fell off / out / down / over"? What I understand is that: "off" is opposite of "on". So if you are "on something" and "...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Doubt about the correct word to use in this phrase

I was insecure about which verb use in this sentence between: allowed, eligible, permit and be able. Only people who bought tickets were ___ to win a prize. It has been told me from some English ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

Is it correct and natural to say “book someone in with a dentist” meaning to make an appointment for someone with a dentist?

Is it correct and natural to say book someone in with a dentist meaning to make an appointment for someone with a dentist? For example: Remember that I booked you in with a dentist for tomorrow at 12 ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Is it “required login” or “login required”?

I was testing some authentification API, and it returned me REQUIRED LOGIN It feels a little bit odd here. Shouldn't it be LOGIN REQUIRED? Or are both grammatically correct? If so, as a standalone ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

What are the differences between “to snap the handcuffs” and “to click the handcuffs”?

In the dictionary snap: 2 MOVE INTO POSITION [intransitive, transitive always + adverb/preposition] to move into a particular position suddenly, making a short sharp noise, or to make something move ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Would you say “don't put the foot in the barrier” or “don't put the foot on the barrier” depending on different kinds of barriers?

There are many types of barriers. Some have very small holes that only a human foot may fit in, some have quite large gaps between the posts (see the picture) If a person put his foot in a hole of ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Is it correct to say “the mug is on the hole” or “the mug is on the ground” in this case?

There is a hole and a mug, the diameter of the mug is bigger than the hole. The mug blocked the hole as shown in the picture. Is it correct to say "the mug is on the hole" or "the mug ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Can we say “colloquial context” or “conversational context” instead of “informal context”?

Instead of saying "informal context", can we say either "conversational context" or "colloquial context"? I thought the words "conversational" and "...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

To move the beginning of the sentence to its ending

Here is a phrase: Don't read the books that you don't really like. Can I change it to the following one? Those books that you don't really like, don't read. My primary interest is technical ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

What phrase, verb or phrasal verb do you use for describing a situation where someone takes someone's job with guile?

What phrase, verb or phrasal verb do you use for describing a situation where someone takes someone's job with guile? Can use the phrasal verb get out? For example: The sly employee get his boss ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Can we say, “can have to” like in,“You can have to buy me a new phone if you drop it”?

As far as I know, we can say "might have to" or "may have to", but I think I am not used to "can have to." Can we say, "can have to" like in this sentence I thought of: "You can have to buy me a new ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What is it called, “the ledge of the ship or the barrier's rail of the ship”?

What is this called, the ledge of the ship or the barrier's rail of the ship?
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What verb or phrase do you use to describe situation where someone chooses to ignore bad treatment from others such as mocking or insulting?

What verb or phrase do you use to describe situation where someone chooses to ignore or not to react to bad treatment from others such as mocking or insulting? Can I use the phrase pay attention? For ...
-1
votes
2answers
41 views

How do I ask this? [duplicate]

Is there a specific phrase I can use to ask someone: What their “rank” amongst their siblings is? To know whether they are the youngest,middle or oldest sibling?
2
votes
1answer
30 views

What are the differences between “the book is on top of his face” and “the book is on the top of his face”?

top [countable] the highest part or point of something at the top of something She was standing at the top of the stairs. The title is right at the top of the page. at the top Write your ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

His new song is English vs His new song is an English song vs His new song is in English

If I am talking about a song in English by a musician who is not English, can I use these sentences interchangeably to mean the song is in English? His new song is English. It is an English ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

three-word compound adjective hyphenation

Which is correct Robotic assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy; or Robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. Similarly also for, Robotic assisted medial and lateral meniscus repair; or Robotic-...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Because I played the piano or because I was playing the piano?

Here is a task in an English test: Last night my neighbors got angry because I (played / was playing) the piano. They repeatedly came to my door and knocked, but I didn't hear the knocks. Why? ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Do we say “the flowers are on the tree” or “the flowers are in the tree”?

It seems that some flowers are on the tree and we can see them obviously but some other flowers are in the tree if they have hidden themselves somewhere under the leaves and branches. This is what I ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

I don't see nobody Vs. I can't see nobody Vs. I see nobody

If I come to my class and I see that I'm the only one there, then what is the way to say it out of the following three? I'm at the class and I see nobody I'm at the class I don't see nobody ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

How to use “before” in the beginning of a sentence?

My sentence: Before the latter half of the 20th century, connecting electronic components together through wires was very complicated and accompanied with a big chance of failure, that is, until ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is it correct and natural to say “put someone in” in the sense of arranging an even with a person?

Is it correct and natural to say put someone in in the sense of arranging an even with a person? For example: Unfortunately I can't help you on Monday. I will put you in for Tuesday for 10 AM. ...
-1
votes
1answer
24 views

Is it correct natural to use the phrasal verb “push forward” in the sense of stimulating someone or making them leave their comfort zone?

Is it correct natural to use the phrasal verb push forward in the sense of stimulating someone or making someone leave their comfort zone? For example: I am quite shy, but my friend is always ...

1
2 3 4 5
11