Questions tagged [phrase-choice]

Is it Either? Is it Or? Is it Neither? Use the Phrase-Choice tag to help you complete the perfect sentence, say what you really mean, and learn new words and phrases.

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1answer
22 views

Can we say “I turned the switch off and the light went out” and “I flipped / flicked the switch off and the light went out”?

flick ​[transitive] to press a button or switch quickly in order to turn a machine, etc. on or off SYNONYM flip flick something He flicked a switch and all the lights went out. flick ...
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“While I was on holiday”, “when I was on holiday” , “while on holiay”, “when on holiday”, “on holiday” or “during holiday”?

Tell me please which one of the following sentences sounds the most natural? I visited a lot of new places while I was on holiday. 2. I visited a lot of new places when I was on ...
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2answers
40 views

How to Talk About Making Pancakes

I've found the following definitions and I'm wondering how they're used with pancakes and other objects. flip 2 : to cause (something) to turn or turn over quickly [+ object] She was sitting in the ...
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1answer
29 views

The use of articles before the proper names of shops

Let's say I am going to buy a new phone and, say, Apple is the brand of my choice. So which one sounds the most natural? I am going to buy a phone at Apple. I am going to buy a phone at Apple'...
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1answer
63 views
+50

“The best part of it” vs “Its best part”

Let's makeup a movie named "XYZ". Let's say a friend of mine said, "I watched a movie named "XYZ" last night. It was really good. Did you watch it before?". I answered, "Yes, I did"; and he asked, "...
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1answer
24 views

“An outsider view” or “a view from outside”

"An outsider view" or "a view from outside" I want to write a review for a scientific debate, while I am not exactly working on the same problems.
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1answer
26 views

Are “I am relaxing” and “I am relaxed” the same?

"Relax" is a complicated verb because of its meanings. re‧lax /rɪˈlæks/ ●●● S3 W3 AWL verb 1 REST [intransitive, transitive] to rest or do something that is enjoyable, especially after you ...
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2answers
46 views

The use of the word “occupy” in the context

Let's say I am staing at a hostel and there is only one electric kettle. I need to to boil some water to cook a meal. So I take it fill it up and turn it on. To cook a meal I need all the water. It ...
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1answer
41 views

Does the question “until what time do you work” sound natural?

Tell me please which one of the following questions sound the most natural? Until what time do you work? What time do you work until? What time do you work to?
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25 views

Does the question “how long do you sleep” sound natural?

Is how long do you sleep something a native English speake would say if the want to know how many hours some sleeps per night? For example: Person A: how long do you sleep? Person B: I sleep ...
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1answer
57 views

Are “It is rainy now” and “it is raining now” the same? Also what is the verb equivalent to the adjective “sunny”?

This is a little bit confusing. rainy (adj): having or bringing a lot of rain a rainy day the rainy season the rainiest place in Britain Ad other dictionary rain‧y /ˈreɪni/ ●●● ...
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18 views

Should I use “which one” “of which one” “one was” or “one of which” for the following sentence

Should I use “which one” “of which one” “one was” or “one of which” for the following sentence Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote four novels ... ‘The Scarlet Letter’ became an American literary icon.
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1answer
25 views

Can I use a phrase 'financial relief' in an essay? Does this phrase make sense in english?

This option brings a financial relief particularly to the owners of uninsured pets.
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1answer
13 views

Difference between “related to” and “associated with”

What is the difference between associated with and related to such as: This degree is (related in / associated with) an increase.
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1answer
28 views

Do we say “you infected me with your disease” or “you transmitted your disease to me” or other common ways to express the same idea?

In the dictionary infect (verb) to make a disease or an illness spread to a person, an animal or a plant infect somebody/something It is not possible to infect another person through ...
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1answer
25 views

are “put on your top / bottoms” more common than “put on your Tshirt / shirt / tank top / pants / shorts …” in English in casual daily situations?

I am not a native speaker. I found that it is easier for me to say this to my daughter when we go out "Sweetie, please put on your top / bottoms" than "Sweetie, please put on your Tshirt / shirt / ...
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2answers
30 views

What is the difference between “come up” and “come over” in the sense of physical motion?

What is the difference between come up and come over in the following contexts? One of the dishes I ordered was missing, so I asked the waiter to come up/come over. A police officer came up to/...
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2answers
29 views

You may hear a moment of silence as I work with your account, better than “i'll put you on hold”

Is it more positive scripting to say "You may hear a moment of silence as I work with your account" instead of "I will put you on hold as I work with your account" on phone conversations.
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1answer
35 views

Is there a difference in meaning between “go to the seaside” and “go to the sea”?

Let's say I am going on vacation. And I am planing to spend my vacation by the sea. Is there any difference between the following sentences? I am going to the seaside. I am going to the sea.
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1answer
15 views

Is the phrase “an extensive amount of hard work” correct and does is sound natural?

What I want to indicate in my writing is that I understand I need to work really hard as a student in the program. I'm using this sentence: I am aware that studying in such an intense and demanding ...
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1answer
38 views

What is the difference between in meaning “in the job”, “on the job” and “at the job”?

Is there any difference in meaning between in the job, on the job, at the job? For example: I have to do a lot today in the job/on the job/at the job. I feel they all mean the same in the context,...
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1answer
40 views

What is the difference in meaning between “come with someone” and “come along with someone”?

Is there any difference in meaning between the following sentences? Why don't you come with us to the party. Why don't you come along with us to the party. I cannot see any difference, but I ...
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1answer
23 views

The use of “take”, “take away”, “take from” or “take away from” in context

Let's a girl has dropped her toy and a boy comes up to her, picks up the toy and instead of giving it back to her he keeps it. Which one of the following sentence ls communicate the idea the most ...
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2answers
53 views

Do native speakers of English really ask “What is your mood”?

Is it perfectly natural to ask someone what is your mood? when someone wants to know how the person is feeling. If it is not natural at all, as I suspect, then what would they ask instead?
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1answer
20 views

Do the phrases “this once” and “this time” mean the same?

Do this time and this once mean the same? For example: I have never allowed you to use my car but this time/this once. If the phrases are identical in meaning, then which once is more common?
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1answer
42 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “manage with someone” and “manage someone” in the sense of dealing with difficult persons?

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two pharases? However do you manage those unrully children? However do you manage with those unrully children? As Macmillan Dictionary ...
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0answers
24 views

Is there any difference between the phrases “as far as something is concerned”, “as far”, “as to” and “regarding” and “concerning”?

Is there any difference between the phrases as far as something is concerned, as for, as to, regarding and concerning? For example: As far as money is concerned, I have enough. What if I swaped ...
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5answers
5k views

Can I say: “The train departs at 16 past every hour“?

In German, we can say "jede Stunde um 16 nach". I just overheard someone teaching there was no such possibility in English. Yet I found "hourly at 45 minutes past" in one answer here. Is the following ...
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2answers
93 views

“somehow” or “ in any way”? [closed]

Tell me please which one of the following sentences sounds the most natural. Can I help you somehow? Can I help you in any way? What I am trying to convey is a willingeness to know if there ...
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1answer
27 views

Is there any difference between the exression “by car” and “in a car”?

Is there any difference between "by car" and "in a car"? For example: I usually come to work by car/in a car.
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0answers
134 views

“… which influenced me …” or “… which was what influenced me”

Q: How did you learn to play the guitar? A1: My mom was a guitarist, which influenced me. A2: My mom was a guitarist, which was what influenced me. What's the difference? Thanks in advance :D
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1answer
63 views

What do you call this in English when you buy something or get something and celebrate it by drinking alcohol?

What do you call this English when you buy something or get something and celebrate it by drinking alcohol? Do you have any verbs or phrases for it? I cannot to find the word in English. But the most ...
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1answer
282 views

“Us Students” Or “We Students”

We students who had not studied were at a disadvantage. Or Us students who had not studied were at a disadvantage.
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2answers
79 views

Do I need to use “guess” or “try to guess” when I want someone to try to anwer my question?

Does the following sentences mean the same? If you don't know the answer, guess it. If you don't know the answer, try to guess it. By the way, do I have to inclide it after guess?
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1answer
36 views

Does this phrase make sense? “excessive movements”

I was writing a story about a bunch of talking puppets. In my story, there was a scene where the puppeteer first met his new puppet. The puppeteer had a very passionate reaction upon seeing her, ...
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2answers
44 views

“My hands are shaking with cold” vs “My hands are shaking with the cold”

I looked at the example sentences for the noun "cold" where it is used with the meaning "low temperature/cold weather" on dictionaries like Cambridge and Collins; and in all of them, after "with", "...
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1answer
31 views

Use these books as a reference

Let's say I want my student to elaborate their knowledge, their skills: Use these books as a reference. I'm not necessarily mean that they must thoroughly study these book, I rather mean that they ...
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2answers
40 views

“broke his arm” vs. “his arm broke”

What is the correct sentence? He fell and broke his arm. He fell and his arm broke.
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2answers
89 views

How to correct “With a growing tech sector in Vancouver and a highly transferable skill set, Maisie can easily find a job”?

With a growing tech sector in Vancouver and a highly transferable skill set, Maisie can reasonably expect to find a suitable job in her field. [The lady is a computer programmer: this is discussed ...
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1answer
40 views

“What new features of C# have you used?” vs “What new features of C# have you worked with?” [closed]

Does this question sound natural: What new features of C# have you used? Or would you use another phrase, for example? What new features of C# have you worked with?
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1answer
22 views

Could “Something has to wait” be a form of euphemism?

A: I'm parking right there. B: You have to wait! A: Why? B: (Pointing at the corner) That car is trying to get out. Here, "You have to wait" feels somewhat abrupt and rude. But if you ...
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1answer
27 views

How would NSE interpret “eyebrows moments”?

In a conversation, I used the following expression. Were there any eyebrows moments during the interview? Regrettably, that expression didn't seem to contribute to smooth communication. The ...
2
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1answer
21 views

if the number IS less than 0 or IS equal to 1

Do need to write "is" twice? if the number IS less than 0 or IS equal to 1 or single "is" is enough: if the number IS less than 0 or equal to 1
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0answers
15 views

is it possible to use 'will' to ask and give info about something that had happened in the past and something that is happening?

my teacher had assigned me the most confusing powerpoint ever. he told me to make a presentation on how to ask and give information about the past, present, and future but using 'will' as the sentence ...
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2answers
24 views

“Setup work environment” vs “Configure development environment”

I need to assign a first task to a new employee, a developer. They must configure the computer, install the necessary software, etc. I need to name this task somehow and put it into a report. Setup ...
2
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2answers
56 views

In one sitting, all at once (AmE usage)

Will it be okay to use "all at once" instead of "in one sitting"? I mean in AmE what would sound more natural? Do they have a slight difference in their meaning? I read the book in one sitting/...
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1answer
22 views

Which one is correct and why? the verb or the gerund

Every one visiting these museums feels happy about it. Or Every one visits these museums feels happy about it.
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1answer
20 views

Is it correct to say “underground”? [closed]

Is the following sentence natural? I made it to work by underground today.
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1answer
25 views

The use of phrase “years ago” in context

Is it natural to say years ago meaning a lot of years ago? For example: I was an excellent football player years ago.
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2answers
194 views

What's are some natural expressions to say when you pick up the order? [closed]

Suppose I ordered some food online. What are some natural (and preferably concise) expressions to say when I arrive at the store? Here are some that I can think of (they may not be natural or ...