Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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1
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1answer
14 views

Which is correct, “differently than” or “differently from”, or neither?

Which is correct, "sort compares strings differently from awk", or "sort compares strings differently than awk", or both are bad, and I should rephrase it?
1
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2answers
20 views

Is there a verb that means “tracks and changes”?

Is there a verb that means "tracks and changes"? I don't think there is so can you find a way to formulate the following sentence in a way that doesn't sound too weird and incomprehensible? For ...
2
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0answers
36 views

Which phrase would be proper to use in written American English?

I need to say that there arises a question after making some points in my essay, so which one is better? Here probably arises a pertinent question as to why he would want to be a bio-engineer now, ...
9
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4answers
2k views

What is the word for “event executor”?

If a company runs a service as "one who arranges, holds, and executes planned events", what's the term of it? "Events executor" seems a rather grim name, "Events arranger" seems lack of fume because ...
14
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7answers
3k views

Phrasal verb for carbonated drinks exploding out of the can after being shaken?

What's the phrasal verb for carbonated drinks exploding out of the can after being shaken? "Exploded out" doesn't sound right, because it doesn't sound idiomatic. I also checked pop off, but it seems ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Word do describe a person who only has knowledge about their own field

I'm looking for a word or phrase to describe a person who does not know much about anything but the field they are majoring or have majored on. For example, a computer scientist who does not know ...
3
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2answers
60 views

What do you call the act of swiping a finger on your lips and blowing it to mimic a crazy person?

What do you call the act of swiping a finger on your lips and blowing it to mimic a crazy person? I am referring to the act of blowing your finger with your lips and making the "BLBLBLBLBLBLBL" sound. ...
1
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1answer
38 views

“Need to” or “have”? Politeness

I want to know how to reply when I want to check it would be proper and right in a polite manner. I'd like to ask whether I understood well. For example, Do I need to hold the figure in both ...
3
votes
1answer
24 views

What to call a list of banknote + quantity

When transfering cash, especially with large sums or in cashier/accounting jobs you are often tasked with filling and/or signing a piece of paper that is essentially a list of nominal values their ...
0
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0answers
12 views

Doing something to take the regret away or reduce it

Is there a phrase or idiom in English to mean that you are engaging in something to make yourself not feel as bad about having done or not done something?
0
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1answer
27 views

Is there a word for major software developers?

Is there a word for major software developers? There are amateur developers who work alone, there are indie developers who work for small companies and then you have Adobe who is a major developer. Is ...
0
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0answers
14 views

What do you call the facial expression where the mouth and the eyes are wide open?

I am thinking about "in awe", but that doesn't necessarily imply that the eyes are wide open and the mouth is also wide open, so if there's no such word is there a phrase that you can use to convey ...
9
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12answers
2k views

What do you call a situation where you have choices but no good choice?

How do you call a situation in which you seemingly have a choice, but whatever you choose it will be to your disadvantage in one way or another?
3
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4answers
53 views

Formal way of saying “cutting”

Say there is a very long article, I took it, then cut/shrink/excerpt it to a much shorter version. What the proper way to express the meaning/action of cut/shrink/excerpt, but in a respectful way?
3
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2answers
815 views

How to say “just a precision” properly in English?

How to say "just a precision" properly in English? By "just a precision", I mean: I said statement X, but I would like to add a statement Y which refines statement X (= make it more precise). ...
2
votes
2answers
34 views

Is there a noun/phrase to call someone living far away from their hometown?

Let's say that Jacob is a student of a high school coming from a place 150 miles away. Because it's inefficient to commute between his school and his home, Jacob decided to rent an apartment near his ...
0
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2answers
32 views

Tit for tat, why tit and why tat

I was wondering why the term tit for tat contains the word tit as in titts, and what does tat mean anyway? Thank you.
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0answers
17 views

Is “to get a view on” idiomatic in this context?

I do this study in order to get a view on that social phenomenon. Is "to get a view on" idiomatic in this context? Or, any other suggestions?
2
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2answers
35 views

looking for an expression related to “hire”

I met John through his parents, who are good friends of mine. For a high school student, his passion for and grasp of econometrics were so impressive that I _____ my econometrics research project that ...
0
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1answer
19 views

What do you call these type of desks?

What do you call these type of desks? They are extremely long and they are fixed, I am thinking they must have a name since they're so different from regular desks. Is it the case? If not, what words ...
2
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3answers
21 views

Is there an idiom or a phrase that means “he's a talented writer”?

Is there an idiom or a phrase that means "he's a talented writer"? I can think of a few way of expressing it, but none of them sound particularly good or idiomatic even. Most of them sounds weird. ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

inquiring about a subject of a sentence that you've just overheard

Imagine you have just entered a room and saw your friends talking about something. One of you friends is finishing her sentence (your friends are talking about aircraft, but you don't know that): ...
0
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0answers
11 views

Using “a far cry from” not for achievements

Is "a far cry from" used for describing situations, in which someone is trying to achieve some result? This phrase looks fine to me (though I am not sure): He was a far cry from being a school ...
1
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2answers
27 views

What's a good idiom or phrase that expresses that someone is corrupt and is working for a company or someone?

What's a good idiom or phrase that expresses that someone is corrupt and is working for a company or someone? There are political shows where it was used, but I don't remember exactly what the ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Is “call in a taxi” correct?

Is "call in a taxi" correct? I thought "call in a taxi" was correct, because you would say "call in a supply package", but after looking up Google, I barely get any results telling me that it's not ...
0
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0answers
12 views

using “all the” and “the whole” with non-countable nouns

This comes as kind of tricky for me. Looking up the definitions in dictionaries seems to clarify things a lot. But when you run into a practical situation, you still get confused. I don't have much ...
0
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1answer
12 views

What's the idiomatic way of describing a question by its recipient?

What's the idiomatic way of describing a question by its recipient? Is "pointed on [someone]" idiomatic? He willingly answers his teacher's questions that are pointed individually on him, but ...
0
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0answers
13 views

“set to” vs “set with”

Could you please tell me what is the correct and idiomatic phrase to say: Set a/the variable to 10 Set a/the variable with 10 I suppose that the second phrase is incorrect. This is for ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

What's the correct way of expressing the action of opening a bridge?

What's the correct way of expressing the action of opening a bridge? Do you think we can make it by the time of the opening of the bridge? Do you think we can make it by the time of bridge ...
0
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0answers
14 views

Is there a verb that means “make a complete 360”?

Is there a verb that means "make a complete 360"? Turn around means make a 180, but I don't know any verb that means "make a complete 360". What's the best word or phrase to say that idiomatically? ...
0
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1answer
57 views

“an off track door”

To describe a sliding door or bifold door coming off its track, I would say The door has come off the track. But it seems increasingly popular to omit the definite article and just say The door ...
1
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2answers
14 views

Is there a phrase or word that means “put on too much makeup”?

Is there a phrase or word that means "put on too much makeup"? I remember there was a phrase and I think it had the word "paste" in it, but I don't remember it. I also think there was a verb that ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Is there a better way to say “I don't know everything he's thinking right now”?

I *, but if I were to guess I would say "he's doing this because he's hungry." Is there a better way to say "I don't know everything he's thinking right now"? I was thinking of writing the sentence ...
1
vote
1answer
21 views

Is there a word for referring to sounds accompagning a company's logo?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWkJ86JqlPA Is there a word for referring to sounds accompagning a company's logo? The video title is "THX Sound Effect", but it doesn't sound idiomatic, and I doubt ...
1
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2answers
32 views

Describing pictures that are part of a brochure

He was showing to me pictures of other members of his orchestra on the invitation brochure to their concert that would take place on Sunday. The meaning that is meant to be expressed here is that ...
0
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1answer
18 views

Another phrase for “usually use”

Do natives say something like: We usually use indefinite article when ... The phrase "usually use" seems a little funny to me)
2
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1answer
26 views

Accelerate the process of entering the project

When a new employee is hired they are attached to an experienced employee that will be helping them at the beginning. This is usually done to Accelerate the process of entering the project. Does ...
0
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0answers
23 views

How to refer to a foreign-language student's ability to use his/her good listening comprehension in conversations?

What's the idiomatic way of describing a foreign-language student's ability not only to understand things, but also to use that knowledge and understanding in conversations? For example, Her ...
14
votes
6answers
3k views

How do we say “within a kilometer radius spherically”?

How do we say "within a kilometer radius spherically"? When we say radius, we think of a circle, so how do you specify that you're thinking of a sphere when you say "within a kilometer radius"?
0
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0answers
15 views

keep title short

Suggestion to use contracted terms in titles (of a book or something) to make them shorter (not too long): Prefer contracted terms to keep titles short. Does the selected phrase sound natural?
0
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0answers
30 views

The meaning of “to be a matter of”?

Happiness is a matter of health in body and soul. The sentence is meant to say that "happiness is defined by health in body and soul". Does "is a matter of" mean that? Is it idiomatic to use it in ...
0
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3answers
56 views

How sarcastically say someone that they cannot fool an experienced person like you?

Is there any proverb or fixed expression to imply that one cannot mislead or deceive a wise and well-experienced person? For instance, let's think that you are a well-versed mechanic and want to ...
0
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1answer
20 views

Fixing code review remarks

The code review is a process of inspection of a software code in order to find flaws, errors, defects etc. During a code review an inspector writes remarks about what is wrong and should be fixed. I ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Is there a better way to say “steal a disease”?

Is there a better way to say "steal a disease"? I feel like "steal a disease" doesn't make much sense, but there's really no better way of saying it. By "steal a disease" I mean transfer the disease ...
4
votes
3answers
636 views

What's the correct term describing the action of sending a brand-new ship out into its first seafaring trip?

What's the correct term in English describing the action of sending a brand-new ship out for its first voyage? For example, if the ship's name is "Elisa", then it would be something like: Finally, ...
0
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0answers
22 views

Is “for a soon-clear reason” a correct phrasing?

I a part of my paper I am going to call this thing I am talking about "XYZ". The reason why I call it XYZ would be clear very soon in the paper. So can I say the following? For a soon-clear reason, ...
5
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7answers
780 views

Is there any word or phrase for negative bearing?

Features of a product matter when you are deciding to buy it. If you know that it has a feature, say x, that you like, then that can motivate you to buy it. But a negative feature, say y, can ...
0
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1answer
35 views

Is there a word or a phrasal verb that describes the action of covering your head for protection?

Is there a word or a phrasal verb that describes the action of covering your head for protection? I am not sure if this is warranted but "covering your head with both of your hands" is a mouthful, so ...
1
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3answers
73 views

What's the opposite of “out loud”?

What's the opposite of "out loud"? I mean, "out loud" as in "singing out loud", what's the opposite of that? Like instead of singing for real, you do it in your head? What's the best way to say it? I ...
0
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0answers
17 views

A phrase meaning “as frequently/often happens”?

I am looking for a phrase meaning "as frequently/often happens"? ---- , she believed it when she heard such sort of rumor.