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1answer
57 views

“an off track door”

To describe a sliding door or bifold door coming off its track, I would say The door has come off the track. But it seems increasingly popular to omit the definite article and just say The door ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Adjective for things that in theory can exist but in real world cannot exist

What adjective can I use for things that in theory can be assumed but in real world never happen? For example, consider "different types of societies". One of the types that we mean is a society in ...
4
votes
1answer
44 views

Adjective for having enough and satisfactory food

I have eaten enough food. The food was delicious and may be I have eaten a lot more than required. I enjoyed it. Now I am very happy about it. How to describe this? Should we say "I have had enough ...
3
votes
3answers
99 views

How do I describe this pattern: B-R-G-B-R-G-B… (In the same sense as “B-R-B-R-B…” is “alternating”)?

Consider the following patterns of colored squares: Courtesy: MS Paint application I can't seem to find a word (phrase?) to describe the pattern observed in the third row. The first row has ...
2
votes
3answers
309 views

Corresponding word for “wet” for diapers

"My diaper is wet." my kid told me. If he pooped in his diaper, can "wet" be used? How to convey the message if he pooped in diaper?
8
votes
2answers
762 views

How to describe this type of laughing?

How to describe myself laughing heartily (at anything funny/hilarious, not offensive one), need a while stopping it, with my body bending forward a little bit(or more)? This is my trying: "I'm ...
0
votes
3answers
76 views

Is there an english adjective meaning “obtained by cutting or by breaking it off something”?

I'm trying to translate a native word. For example: I got this piece of wood by breaking it off from a branch. I got this twine from that ball of string. So, what I'm looking for is a ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the term for titles such as “Alexander the Great”?

Is anyone aware of how one might refer to this sort of title ? I would like to submit this question: What would your <insert word I don't know> be if you were a monarch? (e.g. Frank the ...
0
votes
1answer
9k views

Can we say “expertise knowledge”? A phrase with two synonyms

As I checked the google, expertise is a noun and means "expert skill or knowledge in a particular field". I made the following sentence: .. doesn’t require expertise knowledge of HTML. As I ...
3
votes
1answer
109 views

How can I refer to an object that has been replaced by a new one?

I was on another SE forum and I wanted to speak about the fridge I was using before the new one I bought, I referred to it like this: my old fridge Is that a good way to do it? Whether it is or ...
2
votes
2answers
125 views

Translation of “happy about one's share”

What adjective phrase describes a person that is happy with what he has, in contrast to: a person that envies what other people have; a person that complains about what he doesn't have? In Hebrew ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

How to say “a small and not so important question” concisely?

How to say "a not so important small question" concisely? For example, if I am studying math, and there's a terminology that looks wierd. Its nomenclature gradually becomes a preoccupation to me. I ...