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Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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Phrase request for the expression 'In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king'

A famous Hindi proverb is In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king, it roughly describes mediocrity. Basically, the audience is incompetent (hence blind) and speaker is barely competent/...
0 votes
1 answer
14 views

Other idiomatic phrases conveying the same meaning as "pulling rank"?

During my time abroad, I came across a phrase pulling rank, I found the phrase really fascinating, and I noticed that with dogs as well (this is my interpretation, I could be wrong) i.e. there are ...
4 votes
2 answers
107 views

Can we have adjectives before objective personal pronouns, for example, "I have some photos of baby him"?

THis is a part of the script in the social network film Erica Albright : Well, why don't you just concentrate on being the best you you can be. Mark Zuckerberg : Did you really just say that? Erica ...
0 votes
2 answers
66 views

Popular idiomatic phrase to convey "false pride"?

Being from India, "false pride" is one of my favorite words, as it encapsulates a lot of our culture IMHO. I couldn't think of any idiom/proverb describing the same sentiments. I am trying ...
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Too little when too much is needed

I'm amazed at how the same saying in one language has a counterpart in another language. The Hindi equivalent of "apple of someone's eye" is "star of an eye," with the same meaning:...
0 votes
4 answers
50 views

Can we say "she was sleepwalking" when she is not walking but sitting up?

The definition of sleepwalk is "​to walk around while you are asleep". Say a girl was asleep when she sat up and started talking gibberish with her eyes wide open. Can we say "she was ...
0 votes
4 answers
36 views

Is this a correct usage: 'all expenses met by foundation'

I attended a course abroad. It was an expensive course, but my school's foundation paid for everything. It was a reward for some tests. I want to mention this in my CV. How can I state it in a formal ...
-1 votes
2 answers
76 views

Do you say a bad footballer is "... a player with wooden legs"?

I watched the football match "Belgium-Slovakia" last night. Belgium lost by nil to one to Slovakia. Lukaku, who plays for Belgium, missed a lot of easy goals due to his poor skills and ...
1 vote
4 answers
88 views

Is this called a math problem or a math question or a math exercise?

This text from a first-grade textbook "Tom had 20 eggs and his friends gave him 30 eggs. How many eggs did Tom have?" Is that text called a math problem or a math question or a math ...
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Do we have structure "somebody/something turns somebody off something"?

I don't know why dictionaries only have this structure turn somebody <-> off ​to make somebody feel bored or not interested People had been turned off by both candidates in the election. The ...
-1 votes
2 answers
67 views

Word/phrase to describe this "circular" logic?

Let's say I am unintentionally competing with my friend in a game, and we both are arguing. I say I am not competing with you. (I say it defensively) My friend says you couldn't if you were trying ...
2 votes
4 answers
591 views

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

Merriam-Webster defines it as: "One who passes by" Similarly, Cambridge defines it as: "someone who is going past a particular place" Now, in a particular situation, where a person,...
2 votes
3 answers
92 views

Is it too strong to say "the soup will wash off/ away the lipstick"?

People often use "wash something away/off" with strong water force. For example, The flood washed away the bridge Wash the mud off the bikes before you put them away. A woman is wearing ...
0 votes
2 answers
97 views

Is it correct to say "he gave me a bookshelf" or "he gave me bookshelves"?

The dictionary says a bookshelf is a shelf that you keep books on My dad gave me this one which has 5 shelves: What is this whole thing called? a bookshelf or bookshelves Is it correct to say "...
0 votes
2 answers
98 views

Idiom in english meaning "You need intelligence to cheat"?

Indians are famous for cheating ( for e.g. entire movie industry -- called Bollywood), entire IT industry (Amazon clone, UBER clone etc.). There is a famous idiom in Hindi which loosely translates to ...
2 votes
9 answers
4k views

Alternate idiom or phrase meaning "drought followed by a storm"?

I am writing a short article where I have to describe following situation. Nothing good happens for a long long time, and people are desperate. Then things change and soon go to the opposite extreme, ...
2 votes
1 answer
276 views

How do I use ‘weight’ in a phrase so that it means ‘increase the portion of something’?

I wanted to suggest the team to increase the portion of something. e.g increase it from 10% to 70%. and I want to find a phrase that has "weight" in it. I have searched for weight in, weight on, put ...
2 votes
1 answer
51 views

Is 'puts it on speaker' the most natural way to expess when...?

Jeff's phone rings. It's Billy. He doesn't pick the phone up, just answers, and puts it on speaker. Jeff: Hi, Billy. Is 'puts it on speaker' the most natural way to express this? And is it enough ...
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

can we say "the fan turned off by itself"?

Britannica says 2 turn off (something) or turn (something) off : to stop the operation or flow of (something) by pressing a button, moving a switch, etc. She turned off the alarm/heat/lights/water. ...
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Is it natural to say "drink it up to this level"?

I want my son to drink warm water in the early morning so that he can easily empty his bowel before going to school because it's not nice if he has to do it at school. But, he doesn't like it very ...
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Is it natural to say "Turn the bike so that you and it are side by side"?

Looking at the above picture, I am sure we can say "the woman is sitting on a chair and there is another chair opposite the woman" Now: ... You were sitting at a table. Your child parked ...
1 vote
2 answers
147 views

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

A shop sells many types of toy cars. like the below picture. Source Suppose the first car, which is green, does not sell and the shop doesn't want to keep it. Is it correct to say "We don't want ...
2 votes
2 answers
401 views

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

Sometimes, I can not see the rim or the edge of my adhesive tape because the rim/edge does not stick up but onto the tape tightly and the color is the same. So, is it correct to say "I glided my ...
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

A word to describe the feeling of work not being recognized

I’m looking for a way to describe this feeling. The situation is, a person puts in a lot of thought into for example writing about a subject. They give a well thought-out work, but maybe either their ...
0 votes
1 answer
106 views

Phrase request: Scale units

Can you help me to think of another ways to say: "The gauge has a scale with units at a distance of every 10 cm."? Are the following sentences correct: "The gauge scale is divided by 10 cm ...
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

"Going to the movies is more fun ________" => with company, in company, or something else?

Even if I had a cheap ticket, I'd probably wait until I could go with friends. The whole experience is more fun with company. I initially used with company for this sentence. However, I couldn't find ...
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

When a politician stresses a particular issue (corruption, poverty, illegal immigration, and so forth), what do you call it?

When a politician stresses a particular issue (corruption, poverty, illegal immigration, and so forth), what do you call it? I considered 'talking point', 'selling point', 'agenda', but none of them ...
-1 votes
1 answer
383 views

When can we use "light"as a countable noun?

I don't know why some native speakers say that "I shone light on his face" is wrong. They said I had to say "I shone a light on his face" or "I shone the light on his face&...
5 votes
6 answers
10k views

I'm going to the SHOPS vs I'm going to the STORE (UK vs. US)

The day before yesterday I think, my daughter asked me where we were going and since I was not planning to do the weekly shopping on that day and I just wanted to buy some stuff from two stores, I ...
1 vote
2 answers
50 views

How to phrase this?

Person 1: I hope you can forgive me. Person 2: _______________________? You're my best friend. How could I not forgive you? Why would I not want to forgive you? Why should I not want to forgive you? ...
4 votes
2 answers
16k views

How can I give two reasons in two sentences?

I would like to give reasons for a choice I made in two sentences. I want to have two sentences, because in my case the reasons are quite complicated to explain and it does not make sense to explain ...
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Do you say "her carelessness leaked into her blood" to express that her carelessness is her essence or habit?

Vietnamese people sometimes say "her carelessness leaked into her blood" (literally translated from Vietnamese) when they want to say that her carelessness is her essence or habit and it it ...
7 votes
6 answers
2k views

How to say your English/language is wrong, strange, artificial, wooden, direct copy of your language?

How will native speakers say about strange English? If you English is artificial (When I am using valid words but anyone is not use such words). If you English is wooden (When I am using very ...
0 votes
2 answers
300 views

Do we call it "a lounge" in a cinema?

We have a waiting area in a cinema. As showed in the picture, when you go into a cinema, you see a waiting area facing the counter where people buy movie tickets, or popcorn and drinks. You can sit ...
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

How to say cut in line in British English

I heard in UK "queue" if more often used than "line". Then how can I say "to cut in line" in British English? "to cut in queue" or "to cut in line"? I also found a expression "jump the queue", but I ...
1 vote
2 answers
72 views

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

This is my daughter's math question. The way she did it is to count every cell one by one, which is not effective. So I told her "the first line is 10 and the second is 10 so we have 20 and we ...
0 votes
1 answer
177 views

Ways to refer to a research topic

I look for a construction to start a sentence about previous studies on something, something like In the field of reading comprehension, some studies investigated the effect of visual structure on ...
-4 votes
2 answers
74 views

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

My son is throwing rocks into a pond with dirty black water and if the rock is pretty big it might splash the water all over the place and the water might get his clothes dirty. Can I say to him &...
-1 votes
1 answer
40 views

An expression for venturing into an experiment with unknown consequences without much knowledge

I'm looking for an expression for venturing into an experiment with unknown consequences without much knowledge. I vaguely remember there was something from ancient Greece or in Latin that was ...
6 votes
4 answers
1k views

Is it called a "platform"?

This is the exact picture of my building. (2) & (3) are raised flat surfaces. (3) is higher than (2) and (2) is higher than (1). To go to the pool or building, I have to walk across (1), then ...
1 vote
1 answer
58 views

Curious if there is an idiom for “so as not to deceive”

Basically the title. I wonder if the phrase “so as not to deceive” has any variations, perhaps with a figurative meaning. In Ukrainian there is “Don’t want to bring woe” to wish that positive ...
3 votes
4 answers
323 views

is it correct to say "push the table by its far edge"?

My daughter put her hands in the middle of the edge of the table and pushed a table, which was hard to move the table. So, I told her to put her hands on one end of the edges and push the table, then ...
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

A is in 1st grade and B is in 2nd grade. Is it offensive to say "A studies in lower grade/class"?

I asked Chatgpt this question and it says "A studies in lower grade/class" is offensive because "lower class or grade" shows derogatory. But "class" or "grade" ...
4 votes
2 answers
750 views

are "I will check your homework later" and "I will check on your homework later" similar?

I often ask my children to do homework and after that, what would I say "I will check your homework later" and "I will check on your homework later"? Someone on Quora told me &...
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Is "watch screens" used to cover "watch TV/ phone/ tablet/ laptop..."?

I don't want my children to watch too much TV/ or anything on tablets/phones/ laptops/ smart watches... I don't want to give an exhausting list like that when talking to my children. For examples &...
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

When someone is a grown-up, how can we refer to photos which were they were taken when they were younger? I remember someone told me I can say "a photo of baby you/ baby him / baby Mary...". ...
0 votes
2 answers
57 views

What to say when I'm so excited about a book and read it at crazy speed: "read the book voraciously"?

Searching for the expression online, I've found many examples of the phrase read voraciously, but very few of read the book/novel voraciously. So, is read the book voraciously natural? If not, what ...
0 votes
3 answers
41 views

What is the opposite of "He's full of life"?

I want to say that I'm often drowsy in the morning and I don't want to do anything. I think this state is opposite to being "full of life". But what is the antonym of it?
0 votes
2 answers
69 views

Idiomatic expression alternative 'to end of the queue'?

Let's say I am at a pub with a few of my friends, and we are sitting at the bar. We are all sitting on adjacent seats. So, two of us would be sitting on at the either ends of the (queue?). NP3, NP4, ...
0 votes
2 answers
42 views

Do you say "stand at the beginning of the queue" the same way we say "stand at the end of the queue"?

In the dictionary, "end" is used for both time and space. For example, -They get married at the end of the movie. (time) -The bank is right at the end of the street. (space) Also in the ...

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