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Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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Word/phrase to describe this "circular" logic?

Let's say I am unintentionally competing with my friend in a game, and we both are arguing. I say I am not competing with you. (I say it defensively) My friend says you couldn't if you were trying ...
Max's user avatar
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1 vote
4 answers
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Is this called a math problem or a math question or a math exercise?

This text from a first-grade textbook "Tom had 20 eggs and his friends gave him 30 eggs. How many eggs did Tom have?" Is that text called a math problem or a math question or a math ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
4 answers
589 views

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

Merriam-Webster defines it as: "One who passes by" Similarly, Cambridge defines it as: "someone who is going past a particular place" Now, in a particular situation, where a person,...
EMS's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
98 views

Idiom in english meaning "You need intelligence to cheat"?

Indians are famous for cheating ( for e.g. entire movie industry -- called Bollywood), entire IT industry (Amazon clone, UBER clone etc.). There is a famous idiom in Hindi which loosely translates to ...
Max's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
97 views

Is it correct to say "he gave me a bookshelf" or "he gave me bookshelves"?

The dictionary says a bookshelf is a shelf that you keep books on My dad gave me this one which has 5 shelves: What is this whole thing called? a bookshelf or bookshelves Is it correct to say "...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
43 views

Can we say "she was sleepwalking" when she is not walking but sitting up?

The definition of sleepwalk is "​to walk around while you are asleep". Say a girl was asleep when she sat up and started talking gibberish with her eyes wide open. Can we say "she was ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
38 views

can we say "the fan turned off by itself"?

Britannica says 2 turn off (something) or turn (something) off : to stop the operation or flow of (something) by pressing a button, moving a switch, etc. She turned off the alarm/heat/lights/water. ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
147 views

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

A shop sells many types of toy cars. like the below picture. Source Suppose the first car, which is green, does not sell and the shop doesn't want to keep it. Is it correct to say "We don't want ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
400 views

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

Sometimes, I can not see the rim or the edge of my adhesive tape because the rim/edge does not stick up but onto the tape tightly and the color is the same. So, is it correct to say "I glided my ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
36 views

A word to describe the feeling of work not being recognized

I’m looking for a way to describe this feeling. The situation is, a person puts in a lot of thought into for example writing about a subject. They give a well thought-out work, but maybe either their ...
Conidium_conifer's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
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"Going to the movies is more fun ________" => with company, in company, or something else?

Even if I had a cheap ticket, I'd probably wait until I could go with friends. The whole experience is more fun with company. I initially used with company for this sentence. However, I couldn't find ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
76 views

Do you say a bad footballer is "... a player with wooden legs"?

I watched the football match "Belgium-Slovakia" last night. Belgium lost by nil to one to Slovakia. Lukaku, who plays for Belgium, missed a lot of easy goals due to his poor skills and ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Do you say "her carelessness leaked into her blood" to express that her carelessness is her essence or habit?

Vietnamese people sometimes say "her carelessness leaked into her blood" (literally translated from Vietnamese) when they want to say that her carelessness is her essence or habit and it it ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
71 views

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

This is my daughter's math question. The way she did it is to count every cell one by one, which is not effective. So I told her "the first line is 10 and the second is 10 so we have 20 and we ...
Tom's user avatar
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-4 votes
2 answers
73 views

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

My son is throwing rocks into a pond with dirty black water and if the rock is pretty big it might splash the water all over the place and the water might get his clothes dirty. Can I say to him &...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
42 views

A is in 1st grade and B is in 2nd grade. Is it offensive to say "A studies in lower grade/class"?

I asked Chatgpt this question and it says "A studies in lower grade/class" is offensive because "lower class or grade" shows derogatory. But "class" or "grade" ...
Tom's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
323 views

is it correct to say "push the table by its far edge"?

My daughter put her hands in the middle of the edge of the table and pushed a table, which was hard to move the table. So, I told her to put her hands on one end of the edges and push the table, then ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
58 views

Curious if there is an idiom for “so as not to deceive”

Basically the title. I wonder if the phrase “so as not to deceive” has any variations, perhaps with a figurative meaning. In Ukrainian there is “Don’t want to bring woe” to wish that positive ...
Максим's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
750 views

are "I will check your homework later" and "I will check on your homework later" similar?

I often ask my children to do homework and after that, what would I say "I will check your homework later" and "I will check on your homework later"? Someone on Quora told me &...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Is "watch screens" used to cover "watch TV/ phone/ tablet/ laptop..."?

I don't want my children to watch too much TV/ or anything on tablets/phones/ laptops/ smart watches... I don't want to give an exhausting list like that when talking to my children. For examples &...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
56 views

What to say when I'm so excited about a book and read it at crazy speed: "read the book voraciously"?

Searching for the expression online, I've found many examples of the phrase read voraciously, but very few of read the book/novel voraciously. So, is read the book voraciously natural? If not, what ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
41 views

What is the opposite of "He's full of life"?

I want to say that I'm often drowsy in the morning and I don't want to do anything. I think this state is opposite to being "full of life". But what is the antonym of it?
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Is it natural to say "drink it up to this level"?

I want my son to drink warm water in the early morning so that he can easily empty his bowel before going to school because it's not nice if he has to do it at school. But, he doesn't like it very ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
27 views

is this sentence too long "stand up the footstool so that it is on its side"?

If the footstool is on its side like this, we can not sit on it. So we say "lay the footstool flat" or "lay the footstool down flat" What about do it the other way round? Say a ...
Tom's user avatar
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-4 votes
3 answers
65 views

Do you say "you're very reasonative" the same way we say "you're very talkative"?

A talkative person is one who talks a lot. So, I deduce a reasonative person is one who often gives a lot of reasons for his/her behaviors. There is no "reasonative" entry in dictionary, but ...
Tom's user avatar
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7 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

When someone is a grown-up, how can we refer to photos which were they were taken when they were younger? I remember someone told me I can say "a photo of baby you/ baby him / baby Mary...". ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
41 views

Do you say "stand at the beginning of the queue" the same way we say "stand at the end of the queue"?

In the dictionary, "end" is used for both time and space. For example, -They get married at the end of the movie. (time) -The bank is right at the end of the street. (space) Also in the ...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
54 views

Is that part of an Android tablet charger called a connector in a conversation that a mom may say?

I know some computer and programming stuff and I guess that many people in this forum also have computer or programming knowledge. It seems people who know computer might also be interested in ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
56 views

Can I say "I'm so inclined to.." to mean that "I want to do something so badly"?

I wonder why it's difficult for me to find an example of "so inclined to" in the affirmative form. On the other hand, I've come across many in the negative form, for example: I'm not so ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
5 votes
6 answers
3k views

Is this a school badge?

Is this called a school badge? According to Oxford Dictionary badge: (British English) (North American English patch) a piece of material that you sew onto clothes as part of a uniform the school ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
5 answers
109 views

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

My daughter didn't want to wash her hair. If she went to school with dirty hair, her teachers would notice that and judge (quietly in their head) my wife and me to be lazy parents. To convince my ...
Tom's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
61 views

Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

(source) The thread of my hem of my Tshirt got broken and a short part of the hem is unsewn. Is it correct to say:? the hem came undone the hem came unsewn the hem is falling apart.
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
64 views

What does "a cat is crawling" mean? [closed]

"Crawl" has 2 meanings: 1-to move along on your hands and knees with your body close to the ground The baby crawled across the floor. 2- if an insect crawls, it moves using its legs There’s ...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
48 views

Do you say "he makes money selling saliva" to mean he makes money out of his talking skills?

Sometimes, "to sell saliva" (literally translated) to mean to make money by just using his/her talking skills, normally with a negative meaning. It often used to refer to middlemen. Say you ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
4 answers
46 views

Is there an alternative to "the quality of something being..."?

I've just talked to my friend in English. Him: What's more important: the people you work with or the work that you are doing? Me: I think the quality of the work being interesting is more important. ...
Phoebe's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
42 views

English equivalent to a Hindi proverb?

We have a phrase in our language whose rough translation is Only a jeweler can distinguish a diamond. Basically it is a complement to both parties, mentor and protege. For e.g. I was a nobody in ...
Max's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
92 views

Does it make sense to say to a person "you're good to go" when he is done with something?

In the dictionary be good to go ​(of a thing) to be prepared and ready for use; (of a person) to be prepared and ready to do something By tomorrow afternoon the document will be good to go. I’ve ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
41 views

Is there another way to say instead of saying "make me"?

I watched a film and in the film, a man forced a woman to leave his office but the woman refused to do that. Then he threatened the woman more but she said "make me". I did a study. It seems ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
38 views

Which phrase is more appropriate, instead of "I don't know?"

I'm non native speaker. I usually have some problems with the suitable expressions used in different situations. If I want to say I don't know, for example, which phrase is more appropriate?
Andi Yulianah Said's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

How to express a door opens / closes at different ranges?

Look at the above picture, If the space is A, we say "open the door a crack", can we say "close the door a crack" in this position? If the space is B, we say "open the door a ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
158 views

Synonym for "turn around" in the given context?

Consider the phrase, My English used to be bad, however, between 2012-2015, I lived with American roommates and conversed with them in English. That's when the turn-around came. Can somebody ...
Max's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Do you have idioms with "as simple as ..."? [closed]

I know that we have as easy as anything/as pie/as ABC/as falling off a log: ​(informal) very easy or very easily The whole procedure is as easy as ABC. Fooling him was as easy as falling off a log. ...
Tom's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is it idiomatic to say "I have to race with time" to mean I have to do a thing very fast and finish it before something bad might happen?

I am bringing in the washing when suddenly it starts to rain. I have to do it really fast or else the washing is going to get wet. If I translate from Vietnamese to English, it would be "I have ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
40 views

Can we say "outswim / outclimb / outslide" to mean "swim /climb/slide faster" the same way we say outrun? [closed]

In the dictionary ​outrun somebody/something to run faster or further than somebody/something He couldn't outrun his pursuers. Can we just invent words such as "outswim / outclimb / outslide&...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
32 views

Is it correct to say "squeeze the tube using the flat side of the toothbrush"? [closed]

When my tube is almost out of toothpaste, I often apply the flat side of the toothbrush head onto the tube and run it all the way to the neck of the tube to get some toothpaste out. I just want to ...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
40 views

Do you say "pimples" or "zits" just for acne or for many other spotted skin condition as well? [closed]

I remember when I was 14 or 15, I had many spots on my neck and face. When I popped them, white mucus came out. I think I had acne back then. (Source) When it is very hot, my skin has some small red ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Are "swim across the pool" and "swim widthwise" the same?

A river has 2 long ends and no short ends. So, when you swim across the river, you swim from 1 long side to the other long side. On the contrary, a pool has 2 long ends + 2 short ends. When you say &...
Tom's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Can I say "keep your head tipping backwards for 2 minutes" to mean to keep the head still and in a state that it is fixed at a tipping position?

After I put in eye drops, I need to keep the head still and in a state that it is fixed at a tipping position for 2 minutes so that more drops get into my eyes and don't come out too much. The verb &...
Tom's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
183 views

Do we have a verb to express "you give a seat to an old person on a train when no seat is available"?

On a crowded train, there is no available seat. An old man gets on the train looking around for a seat. You stand up and give your seat to him. Do we have a specific verb to express "you give a ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Is the way I use "their" in this sentence natural: 'Entrepreneurs are becoming more daring, and their number in the US is increasing every year'?

Entrepreneurs are becoming more daring, and the number of entrepreneurs in the US is increasing every year. How not to repeat the word "entrepreneurs" here without changing the first clause ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar

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