Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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2answers
30 views

How do I describe the phrase “It do can I”?

If I change “I can do it” to “it do can I” How do I describe this way of writing? I think “I wrote it backwards” or “I wrote it back to front” can be misleading as a mirror writing because it can mean ...
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3answers
23 views

third speed of the fan

I have a fan with three different levels of speed, level 3 being the fastest speed. How should I ask someone in English to turn on the fan so that it would be the third speed? I was thinking of "...
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1answer
44 views

What is the opposite of "earliest time" [closed]

I want to say When is the last possible time to start the program? I feel like there is a better way to put this in words. I know for the opposite I can say When is the earliest time to start the ...
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1answer
21 views

to come second best, but not in racing

Would it be natural in English to use "You came second best" applying it to a situation not related to physical running? For example, you are holding a list of one class' students' test's ...
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1answer
66 views

Can I say "Reduce costs by up to 50% less"?

I want to talk about an achievement and say that sometimes costs are reduced by 20%, sometimes by 50%. I created a solution to reduce costs by up to 50% less. How should I phrase this?
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1answer
30 views

What do you call (too) elaborate words and expressions?

What do you call (too) elaborate words and expressions? Like when you use literary words no one really uses or intricate comparisons (like, if you watched the TV series The Walking Dead, the way ...
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1answer
36 views

Is it correct to say "Vitamin C pills bubble up and dissolve when they are in the water"?

The market sells some Vitamin C pills and when you put it into a glass of water, it dissolves itself and causes tiny bubbles in the water as shown in the picture above. Is it correct to say "...
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2answers
645 views

Word or phrase to describe people who work in think tanks / policy institutes?

Is there a word/term/phrase that specifically describes people who work in think tanks or policy institutes (doing socioeconomic research)? "Researchers" don't work for me since academics ...
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1answer
16 views

idiomatic English phrase for 'intuitive operation'

I have a new microwave. There are many commercial stickers on it advertising this newly-made model. Here is rough translation into English of some of the phrases from those stickers: 5 modes of ...
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1answer
33 views

What's the phrase that mean "eating without restriction"?

She let off loose after marrying him and gained 40 pounds. Is it let off loose or is it another phrase? I don't remember the phrase used to mean "eat without restriction". It was a slang I ...
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11answers
7k views

Is there an idiom that says not to change a perfectly good thing?

Is there an idiom/word/proverb that says not to change a perfectly good thing or something that works?
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1answer
29 views

How can I ask a question of somebody when I wonder where he or she was placed in the competition?

Under the circumstances where someone i know took part in a competition, an exam or a race and got the results which i don't know yet, I wonder where he or she was placed. So I might ask him or her a ...
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1answer
15 views

getting rid of "figures", "phenomena" and "features" in describing a common trend

I've noticed that in describing some common trends in English such nouns like "figure", "phenomenon" and "feature" are massively used. Is it possible to avoid using them ...
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1answer
16 views

What is the phrase used for a "theory of mine" or a "theory I made up or came up with"?

What is the phrase used for a "theory of mine" or a "theory I made up or came up with"? There's a phrase for this, but I don't remember what it was. Was it "pocket theory"...
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1answer
29 views

with urgency or urgently?

I believe my question refers to collocations and also to which is the most common way of saying that I will send a message alerting people that they have to solve a situation urgently. I've done some ...
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0answers
27 views

Is there a transitive phrasal verb for dance?

I am looking for a transitive phrasal verb that means "danced X dance" He spun out the Duck dance in front of everyone. I don't think spun out a dance is idiomatic. I am looking for ...
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0answers
31 views

Can "point-down" be used as an adverb even we don't see it in dictionaries?

I heard a native speaker say "put the knife point-down into the basket" when teaching people to put knives into a basket of a dish washer the right way. And he said "point-down" is ...
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9answers
3k views

Is "100% correct pronunciation" an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

If I put "100% correct pronunciation" in the following sentence, is it understandable and correct? "100%" is what I would like to emphasize. If it is not right, how should it be ...
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2answers
25 views

Is it correct to say "The claws or sides of the hairclip" in everyday conversations?

In the dictionary claw(noun): part of a tool or machine, like a claw, used for holding, pulling or lifting things I am not sure the 2 ides/parts of a hairclip are called "claws". Is it ...
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1answer
88 views

Is it OK to say "Thanks all the same" in this scenario?

Someone sent a message to me unexpectedly and I replied with a question mark, then he told me that he just made a mistake by selecting the wrong recipient. I read the message and found that it is very ...
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0answers
39 views

Can we say inevitably important?

In the following sentence I would like to mention that "childhood is very important and its role is inevitable". Is it clear to reduce this clause to inevitably important? The general view ...
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0answers
25 views

Do we say "some tiny bits of yogurt or ice cream" "drops"?

Some food such as ice cream, yogurt, smoothies etc is in form "a semi-liquid". It is not water but not frozen. It is in the middle. When eating yogurt, sometimes some tiny bits of yogurt, ...
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0answers
28 views

What is the correct term/expression for libraries' acquisition of books etc, as determined by the users?

When libraries' decide what books etc they are to add to their collections, they look at, among other things, what people want to borrow, right? Now I'm wondering what the correct nominalisation for ...
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0answers
30 views

Is it correct to say "he has his gun/knife etc tucked in his waistband/belt"?

Suppose he doesn't use a holster or bag to put his gun/knife in. His gun/knife etc is held between the belt/ the waistband of his pants and his belly/side/back. Is it natural to say "he has his ...
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2answers
31 views

Doubt about using "to be read" in a sentence

In "story time", the teacher reads stories and students listen. Now there is a child who wants to listen to animal stories. Can I use the phrase "to be read" in the following ...
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1answer
49 views

Is it correct to say "Cut the onion in two then place down the cut-side of the onion on the cutting board"?

I have an onion. I cut it in two. As shown in the picture, you can see the flesh of the onion when you look at "the cut-side of the onion". I want to keep the "the cut-side of the onion&...
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1answer
33 views

Is it correct to say "the apple is soaked/stale/soggy with water"?

Sometimes, when I am in a supermarket, I see an apple whose some parts contain more water than the other parts. This could be because sellers spray water on apples to keep them fresh and the water ...
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0answers
21 views

Figurative use of "buy" in a phrase such as "just to buy myself peace of mind"

I came across the phrase "just to buy myself peace of mind". I am wondering, are there other examples where "buy" is used similarly to communicate paying a figurative price in ...
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1answer
25 views

Is there a neutral expression that just means that the brake was pressed normally from the foot? [closed]

I think the sentence, "I pressed the brakes" has an undertone that the action was performed from hands while the sentence, "I stomped on the brakes" somewhat implies that massive ...
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2answers
23 views

How to properly phrase it "Archive 3 recent days"

I've been thinking how to phrase a sentence. I meant to say we will back up a copy daily. If today is Thursday, we have an archive of Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. If today is Sunday, we have a copy ...
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0answers
19 views

Idiomatic expression that means: "for good reasons, but also for not so good reasons"

Let's say someone gets furious for the slightest reasons, for example if the door didn't open immediately or if he didn't have enough money at the supermarket (not very good reasons) but also if he ...
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1answer
49 views

What do you call a text stating someone's expert opinion about an academic work?

I'm translating a template for a job application, and now I'm stuck on the following sentence: Any expert opinion regarding your doctoral thesis should be included with the application Does the ...
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1answer
45 views

Is this a "packet" or "package of rice crackers" in British/American English?

I have a bag which contains smaller bags and each small bag contains 2 rice crackers as shown in the picture. Do British people say "a bag of rice crackers" and "a packet of rice ...
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1answer
23 views

Which is better: "Supervisory Experience"; "Supervisor Experience"; or "Experience as a Supervisor"?

I'm looking for the appropriate heading in a CV to express experience of supervising students' degree projects. Which would you say would be the better choice for this – "Supervisory Experience&...
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1answer
27 views

Is "on the left/right" relative to how you stand?

A man is giving a direction to a woman. You can see the man's front face and the back of the woman's head in the picture. The woman: How can I get to JK office? The man: Take the elevator on the left....
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1answer
30 views

Is "UHT milk" called "boxed milk" or "long life milk" or "shelf stable milk"?

I remembered some native speakers said "you should not say a box of milk, but a carton of milk". However, in many Asian countries, they have milk in boxes that can be stored in room ...
1
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1answer
50 views

What is a common general term to refer to a man with large strong muscle?

What is a common general term to refer to a man with large strong muscle? For example, "he is very muscly" or "he is well-built". He may or may not go to the gym. Maybe, he was ...
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5answers
3k views

What is the verb used when we pull the fishing rod when a fish takes bait, for example, "yank the fishing rod out of the water"?

I am teaching my child to fish -Put the bait on the hook -Let down the fishing rod into the water (I am not sure "let down" is a right word here) -When you feel a fish takes the bait, yank ...
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1answer
25 views

The best way to describe the result of the process of choosing

I want to make a sentence describing a process of choosing clothes by a girl resulting in making her choice. I am not sure how to do the final part of the sentence: "She spent 5 hours choosing ...
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1answer
28 views

What do you call this kind of hairstyle? Is there a specific term for it? (Like marcel waves and such?)

One of my characters has a similar hairstyle to Mary Poppins. I can't find the specific term though. Can anyone help me identify it?
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2answers
43 views

Can we say "just over twice as many as" and "far over twice as many as"?

Class 1 has 50 students and Class 2 has 100 students. We say "Class 2 is twice as many students as class 1". Class 1 has 50 students and Class 2 has 95 students. We say "Class 2 is ...
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1answer
40 views

Is it correct to say "The piggy tricked the wolf into falling into the hole"?

I am not sure how to use the structure "A tricked B into doing something". Was B willing to do that thing at first? This is the example in the dictionary "He tricked me into lending him ...
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1answer
20 views

A term for the period of time after terminating a contract

I have a virtual address service that I would like to terminate abruptly. It will take some time to update all the contact points, and there might also be contacts that I forget to inform. I would ...
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2answers
60 views

Do we say "the city is having a blackout" or "we are having a blackout"?

This is from the dictionary Several neighborhoods in the San Francisco area experienced blackouts last night. So I think people will say "the city is experiencing a blackout". My question is ...
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1answer
74 views

How to mention thesis in a paper?

I've written an academic paper with my master thesis. I need to mention my master thesis in the paper, but I'm not sure what I should write. Some examples: This paper was derived from my master ...
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1answer
39 views

Is it natural to say "the cup is on the edge of the table, push it in please"?

My children are too small and they don't understand much about carefulness. For example 1, they sometimes put the cup on the edge of a table like this. And I want them to push the cup toward the ...
1
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1answer
29 views

Sunday is my {cheat day}

I came across the following sentence: Sunday is my cheat day, so I'm gonna really pig out. I am wondering, can "cheat day" be used when talking about a day when I do not stick to a certain ...
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10answers
2k views

"a man/woman of difficult situations", does this sound idiomatic?

If an employee, for example, has proven on multiple occasions that he/she is dependable and can handle difficult times elegantly, in my native language we call this person "a man/woman of ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Is it correct to say "walk down the corridor and take the second left. The elevator is on the left"?

I am standing at 1 end of a corridor as shown in the above picture. I want to go to the elevator 2. Is it correct to say "walk down the corridor and take the second right. The elevator is on the ...
10
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12answers
2k views

Idiom that means “to do something that yields no result” [closed]

Is there an idiom that means “to do something that yields no result?” I don’t know if the idiom “to carry water to fill up a dry well” exists in English.

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