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Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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What do you call a mock project in developer internship?

Some IT companies offer internships where would-be developer employees build a project. It may be quite complex, involve dozens of people on the team (backend, frontend, BAs, MQAs, AQAs, PMs, POs, and ...
Sergey Zolotarev's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

What are the dirty things that come out when you erase a mark called?

You use a sharpener to sharpen a pencil and you have wood shavings. Now, you use an eraser to erase a mark on a paper and you have some dirty bits. What are these bits called? Are they called dirt? ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
88 views

Is it too strong to say "the soup will wash off/ away the lipstick"?

People often use "wash something away/off" with strong water force. For example, The flood washed away the bridge Wash the mud off the bikes before you put them away. A woman is wearing ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
74 views

Is "the clock came alive" the opposite of "the clock went dead"?

One of the meanings of the adjective "dead" is having no power/electricity/battery. But I don't see the opposite adjective "alive" meaning having power/electricity/battery. We can ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Is it ok « It’s not a world where to grow up »

I have a song that I said something that doesn’t really sounds great grammatically but I wanna know it’s ok or a big mistake « Everytime I speak it seems too hard, it’s not a world where to grow up » ...
VALCO's user avatar
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2 votes
4 answers
59 views

How to say that my action wasn't effective because I applied it to the wrong thing?

I'm familiar with the expression "barking up the wrong tree" but it means "complaining about something to/with the wrong person". I'm looking for a generalization of that, i.e. &...
ris8_allo_zen0's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
171 views

Is it correct to say "I'll make up the time" or "I'll make up for the time"

Normally, after my daughter finishes her dinner, I let her watch TV for awhile up to 7:30pm. I will turn on the TV, she can not turn it on by herself. For example, if she finishes her dinner at 6:45 ...
Tom's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
263 views

Is it correct to say "I choked on water through my nose"?

When swimming, water might get into your nose suddenly and cause a short sharp pain in your sinus and a short time of breathing difficulty. We say "he choked on water" which implies the ...
Tom's user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
28 views

is it correct to say "Pull your forearms down at a right angle with your upper arms"?

I saw this sentence in Oxford dictionary Place the table at right angles/at a right angle to the wall I am sure if it means the table is in contact with the wall lengthways or widthways or not. It ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
51 views

Phrase that roughly means "I'm fine with it"

There's some phrase in English that roughly means "I'm fine with it". I thought that phrase is "is it" (or "it is"), as in: — I want strawberry ice cream — Strawberry ...
Sergey Zolotarev's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
36 views

Phrase request: one which is used to transition from generality to details

Overall, 11% of Australians, or 1,837,000 people, were living in poverty in 1999. _______, aged people were the least likely to be poor, with poverty levels of 6% and 4% for single aged people and ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
269 views

Can the top and bottom having the same pattern be called "outfit"?

(Source) Women in hot countries often wears these clothes at home. The top and the bottom share the same pattern. Do you say "she is wearing an outfit"? (source) Or the above guy wears a T ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
81 views

Do you say "half boarding school"?

I know that "boarding school" means students live in school and don't go home during the school year. They might go home on weekends. In Vietnam, we have 3 types of school. -Type 1: you get ...
Tom's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is "as easy as eating candy" idiomatic or common used in spoken English?

When translating it from Vietnamese (my mother tongue) to English, it is "it's as easy as eating candy". That is a common expression in Vietnamese. I couldn't find this phrase "as easy ...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
63 views

What are questions do you ask to know the day of the week and the date from the Calendar? [duplicate]

Oxford dictionary has this example ‘What day is it today?’ ‘Monday.’ So, I guess "What day is it?" is used you want to know the day of the week. Oxford also has another example ‘What's the ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
44 views

Is 'time-impaired' in this context idiomatic?

I am reading Limited Liability Companies for Dummies by Jennifer Reuting, and the use of 'impaired' sounds strange to me in this context: I know, I know — you’re busy! You operate on a need-to-know ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,539
2 votes
3 answers
71 views

Can "the line" be in a circle?

Source: https://baitap365.com/bai-viet/88963-giai-bai-23-doc-rong-ran-len-may-sgk-tieng-viet-2-tap-1-ket-noi-tri-thuc-voi-cuoc-song#!#google_vignette A group of children walked one after another in a ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
58 views

Is there a phrase to express a thing has already happened really soon after something has been happened?

My child has been sick for just 2 days and now he is much thinner than he was 2 days ago. Do you have a common phrase to express that idea in English? U am not sure "no sooner.. than" is ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Is it correct/natural to say "don't mingle with a crowd. It's dangerous."?

When I was young, my dad often said "avoid crowds. You might get killed." When there is an accident or a fight, a lot of people gather to watch it. Say, if that was an accident, the vehicle ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
77 views

What are the 2 moving pieces hinged on a toilet bowl called?

What are the 2 moving pieces hinged on a toilet bowl called? Is the one that has no hole called "a lid" and the one with a hole called "a cover"? There are 2 toilets in my house, ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
86 views

Is there a word or phrase describing a tree in winter with all its leaves fallen off?

Is there a word or phrase describing a tree in winter with all its leaves fallen off? It makes me look at it in awe.
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,873
0 votes
2 answers
39 views

Do you have a common term to express the cost of seeing a doctor in contrast with the medication cost?

Some medical insurances only cover these costs: -the fee that allows you to be checked by a doctor. -the doctor might do some procedure on you, for example, removing earwax from your ear. Then, the ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
56 views

A natural way of inquiring the length of time elapsed since a certain act in the past

"How long have you opened it?", as far as I understand, means pretty much the same as "How long have you been opening it?", that is, "How much time have you already spent ...
brilliant's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
86 views

what word or phrase describes one who doesn't know about plants/flowers?

I can't name a plant, e.g. i don't know the.difference between snowdrop and orchid. What word or phrase can describe me? Does phrase like "flower-blind" exist?
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,873
9 votes
3 answers
2k views

What are mild versions of unrequited love?

Unrequited love refers to unidirectional romantic love. Is thete a similar phrase or word for milder cases such as friendship or career connection?
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,873
2 votes
1 answer
119 views

What words for describing or referring to a person showing off wits?

What words (adj., noun) describe or refer to a person who likes to show off their wits/cleverness/smartness by speaking (puns, jokes, sarcasm, satire, etc) or facial/body.language (e.g. smug)?
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,873
2 votes
2 answers
445 views

What is a misreading error called?

Merriam Webster defines typo as an error (as of spelling) in typed or typeset material. What is a misreading error called? Seeo? For example, I misread chuck as chunk.
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
2k views

Do you say "give a sociable compliment" when you mean you give a compliment as a way to socialize with people but it's not a true praise?

This often happens in every culture but I think it happens more in Western countries. That is when you socialize with your friends, you often gush about their things. For example, you saw your friend ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
161 views

Do we say "durable" for people as in "he is durable"?

We say "My shoes are durable. I have been wearing them for a long time but they are still good". Can we say "He is durable. He can run for hours without being tired"? I did some ...
Tom's user avatar
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4 votes
8 answers
2k views

How do you express that your children to sit down to study by themselves without your urge?

This is one of the problems that all parents face. That is your children don't sit down to study by themselves because they think they must do it. But most children only sit down to study when their ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
75 views

How to say that you agree to let someone have an advantage in everyday English?

Say, A and B is going to have a fight. A is using his bare fists and B is using a stick. Is it natural for A to say "I let you use the stick at an advantage" or "I accept your using the ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Is it natural to say "she had her fake eye attached"?

An old person had a bad eye and the surgeon took it out and put a fake eye in. Do we have a common term to express that action? For example, "she had her fake eye attached / installed / joined ......
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
2 votes
1 answer
88 views

Do we say "we fit out the flat" (A flat of a new-built tall building has no tiles, carpet, bathrooms, kitchens...)?

A tall building has been built and its apartments has no tiles, carpet, bathrooms, kitchens. What do we call these apartments in English? If I translate from my mother tongue (Vietnamese) to English, ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

be excited + infinitive

I understand that "I'm excited to see her" means that I am looking forward to seeing her.The sentence seems for me to have a similar structure with such senteces:1. I'm surprised to see her....
Nigutumok's user avatar
  • 568
1 vote
1 answer
56 views

Is it natural to say "he tripped in the gap" in this situation?

There are a lot of gaps in floors like this on construction sites: And there is a good chance that a worker might trip ...? I don't know what preposition I should fill in the dotted line. We often ...
Tom's user avatar
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10 votes
4 answers
3k views

Seeking an English Equivalent for the Concept of "Evil Eye"

I'm trying to understand how to express a concept from my culture in English. In my language, we have a term, which roughly translates to casting the evil eye. This term is often used in situations ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
75 views

Do we say "he pressed his lips inward" in this situation?

According to a dictionary, purse your lips to form your lips into a small tight round shape, for example to show that you do not approve of something. Some people also say "pout your lips" ...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
53 views

The consumption of all the four meat types is

Let's say there're four types of meat and the consumption of each type is forecast to fall. If I write, "The consumption of all the four meat types is forecast to fall," it might be ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
10 votes
6 answers
7k views

What is the British version of "jaywalk"?

American people say jaywalk: to cross a street carelessly or at an illegal or dangerous place The police officer warned us not to jaywalk It seems British people don't say "jaywalk". Do we ...
Tom's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
306 views

"that is" in the sense of "to be specific"

Looking at the information in more detail, for every 100 million PMT, 76 incidents took place on a bus in 2002, resulting in 66 injuries correspondingly. The same number of incidents can also be seen ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
409 views

Collocations used when talking about doing a job as in a paid position of regular employment

If I moved to a foreign country to work there, what were some collocations I should use? "I'm going to England to take/work/undertake/carry out/perform/do a job." I'm not sure which verbs ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
80 views

How to ask where someone just came from?

I have one question almost meaning like this "where are you coming from?" but not ask country or state or province, it is not long way long time. It is short way and just happening. It is ...
user2251274's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

I don't have "much more" or "much else" to say [closed]

I am a project manager working in English. I pretty much always close my meetings saying: Okay everyone, I don't have much else to say; if anybody has a comment or a question feel free to speak now, ...
jeanpineau's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
84 views

How to ask for the position on a book that someone has finished reading

What are some of the most frequent questions to ask friend for the position (either general like chapter number or specific like page number) in a book that they have finished reading yesterday? I ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
53 views

Is the use of the construction 'May I have you...' to begin a request unnatural?

Is the use of the construction 'May I have you...' to begin a request unnatural? I have been using this construction for quite some time, what with 'May you...' not being an appropriate beginning to a ...
murshad's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

". . . who probably confounded the word with a familiar oath" - What *is* the "familiar oath"?

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVII, published 1892) Passage 263 ...That Trent, he come first, with his 'and in a bloody rag. I was near 'em as I am to you; ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 1,511
0 votes
1 answer
463 views

What do nasty kids call their mother/father?

I'm wondering what kids use to call their parents when they are quarrelling with them. I assume the common rude way to call women is bitch. But is it something kids use even when they are very nasty? ...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 564
5 votes
5 answers
1k views

The word that describes the feeling when you're disgusted by a certain taste

Imagine that you're having a really sweet and high-fat piece of cake. At first, you can have it just fine, but after a while you get sick of its overwhelming taste. How do I describe that I am now ...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 194
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Is it correct to say "get to sleep" in this situation?

Now it is 10 pm and you put your daughter on the bed and tuck her in and you want her to fall asleep quickly. Now your daughter sit up and talk and play with toys on the bed. I see this in Oxford ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Can we say "he picked his ear" to mean "to remove earwax from his ear canal" the same way we say "pick his nose/teeth"?

We often say "he picked his teeth" meaning he removed food in his teeth, and "he picked his nose" meaning he removed boogers in his nose. Is it common to say "he picked his ...
Tom's user avatar
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