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Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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10 votes
6 answers
7k views

What is the British version of "jaywalk"?

American people say jaywalk: to cross a street carelessly or at an illegal or dangerous place The police officer warned us not to jaywalk It seems British people don't say "jaywalk". Do we ...
Tom's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
306 views

"that is" in the sense of "to be specific"

Looking at the information in more detail, for every 100 million PMT, 76 incidents took place on a bus in 2002, resulting in 66 injuries correspondingly. The same number of incidents can also be seen ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
413 views

Collocations used when talking about doing a job as in a paid position of regular employment

If I moved to a foreign country to work there, what were some collocations I should use? "I'm going to England to take/work/undertake/carry out/perform/do a job." I'm not sure which verbs ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
86 views

How to ask where someone just came from?

I have one question almost meaning like this "where are you coming from?" but not ask country or state or province, it is not long way long time. It is short way and just happening. It is ...
user2251274's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
111 views

I don't have "much more" or "much else" to say [closed]

I am a project manager working in English. I pretty much always close my meetings saying: Okay everyone, I don't have much else to say; if anybody has a comment or a question feel free to speak now, ...
jeanpineau's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
94 views

How to ask for the position on a book that someone has finished reading

What are some of the most frequent questions to ask friend for the position (either general like chapter number or specific like page number) in a book that they have finished reading yesterday? I ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
53 views

Is the use of the construction 'May I have you...' to begin a request unnatural?

Is the use of the construction 'May I have you...' to begin a request unnatural? I have been using this construction for quite some time, what with 'May you...' not being an appropriate beginning to a ...
murshad's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

". . . who probably confounded the word with a familiar oath" - What *is* the "familiar oath"?

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVII, published 1892) Passage 263 ...That Trent, he come first, with his 'and in a bloody rag. I was near 'em as I am to you; ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 1,511
0 votes
1 answer
562 views

What do nasty kids call their mother/father?

I'm wondering what kids use to call their parents when they are quarrelling with them. I assume the common rude way to call women is bitch. But is it something kids use even when they are very nasty? ...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 564
5 votes
5 answers
1k views

The word that describes the feeling when you're disgusted by a certain taste

Imagine that you're having a really sweet and high-fat piece of cake. At first, you can have it just fine, but after a while you get sick of its overwhelming taste. How do I describe that I am now ...
hhhh's user avatar
  • 196
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Is it correct to say "get to sleep" in this situation?

Now it is 10 pm and you put your daughter on the bed and tuck her in and you want her to fall asleep quickly. Now your daughter sit up and talk and play with toys on the bed. I see this in Oxford ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Can we say "he picked his ear" to mean "to remove earwax from his ear canal" the same way we say "pick his nose/teeth"?

We often say "he picked his teeth" meaning he removed food in his teeth, and "he picked his nose" meaning he removed boogers in his nose. Is it common to say "he picked his ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
3 answers
68 views

What is the common verb used to say you jerk a little bit because someone suddenly calls you while you are focusing on something?

Sometimes, I was watching TV or studying when my daughter suddenly called me or suddenly tap me on my back from behind. That action made me jerk a bit or give me a little shock. Is it correct to say &...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
1 vote
2 answers
142 views

How express you tie 2 strings in such a way that it has a loop?

Look at the picture above, when you tie 2 strings together, you create a complete knot like the last third picture. This kind of knot is very hard for you to untie them. When I tie 2 strings together,...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
8 votes
6 answers
1k views

Word/phrase for straight-lined

I don't even know how to describe my question, but it's like going in straight line vs not going in straight line, like: what's the proper word/phrase to express the idea that I've __________ the ...
xpt's user avatar
  • 2,288
0 votes
6 answers
352 views

Is it correct to say "The washing machine signaled off"?

When my washing machine finishes washing, it makes "beep-beep-beep" sound to let me know that it has finished. I found this example in the Oxford Dictionary The microwave beeps to let you ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
2 votes
2 answers
425 views

What is the piece of wood that is often long and square in cross-section and used to make table legs or chair legs called?

Look at the above picture, you'll see 2 pieces of wood that are long and square in cross-section. They are used to make chair legs. What are they called? I don't think they are called "plank"...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
1 vote
3 answers
54 views

How to express informal strong dislike

As you can say in a positive informal way that you have a "soft spot" for something, or you "have a thing for"... what would you use to say informally you have a dislike or you do ...
Sofia Cattani's user avatar
12 votes
6 answers
6k views

What is a noun expressing a very young person who has advanced skills even higher than adults?

Mozart composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. Not many grownups can do that. What is a noun expressing a very young person who has advanced skills even higher than adults?...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
4 votes
2 answers
103 views

Can we have adjectives before objective personal pronouns, for example, "I have some photos of baby him"?

THis is a part of the script in the social network film Erica Albright : Well, why don't you just concentrate on being the best you you can be. Mark Zuckerberg : Did you really just say that? Erica ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
3 answers
87 views

Can we say "we are just about a third way to the city"?

halfway (adj/adv): in the middle between two points Say, the distance between your house and your friend's is about 20 miles. You are driving to your friend's house and your car is about 10 miles away ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
10 votes
4 answers
3k views

Can we use "gift" for non-material thing, e.g. "My dad took me to the amusement park as a gift"?

Dictionaries say "a gift: a thing that you give to somebody, especially on a special occasion or to say thank you" I am not sure if "a thing" here can be a non-material thing. For ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
2 votes
2 answers
826 views

(How) can I say 'state of the [non-art]'?

I read the noun 'state of the art' or the adjective 'state-of-the-art' every now and then, but once in a blue moon I saw 'state of the [non-art]'. I cannot remember what the [non-art]'s are, then I am ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,591
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

What are the synonyms to the phrase "balls to bones" from Matrix movie?

That's a part of Oracle and Neo dialogue from Matrix: Oracle: So, what do you think? You think you're the one? Neo: I don't know. Oracle: You know what that means? It’s Latin. Means “Know thyself”. I’...
Uk rain troll's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
47 views

Is there a phrase like "there is always a tea shop set up earlier"? [closed]

The compelling ending of this article reads that: Mankind can always pride itself for the giant leap with a small step. But remember, there is always a tea shop set up earlier. I wonder if the ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,591
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Alternative idiom or phrasal verb for eating an elephant one bite at a time

Eat an elephant one bite at a time. I am looking for an alternative to this idiom that expresses the same idea. The idea expressed: If a big task is given, tackle it piece by piece
nicku's user avatar
  • 775
1 vote
1 answer
279 views

The idiomatic antonyms of "keep someone in the loop"?

In this thread I realized that 'loop someone in' does not fit in the scenario of inviting someone into a WhatsApp group for an intermittent discussion, and the idiomatic expression should be 'keep ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,591
7 votes
1 answer
3k views

Can we use "since" in future tenses, for example, "I will be free since 6pm today. Now is 3pm"?

We normally use "since" to mean "from a time in the past until a later past time, or until now". Can we use "since" in future tenses, for example, "I will be free ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
2 answers
39 views

Term for predecided meaning of an unrelated expression

I just heard a friend telling me about a concept of gryps. Translating it to English produced very little (let alone anything of relevance). Originally, a gryps, is a message passed to, from or within ...
Konrad Viltersten's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
660 views

What is the verb expressing the action of moving some farm animals in a field to let them eat grass or plants?

The verb "drive an animal" is to force an animal to move. For example, the shepherd is driving a cow. It does not mean to make the cow eat. What is the common verb expressing the action of ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Is it correct to say "Can you put your school supplies into your backpack"?

I want my daughter to put her ruler, 2 pencils, 1 eraser and a book into her backpack. Do we have a general word to refer these things? I thought of "stuff" but it is too informal. Can I say ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
1 vote
1 answer
157 views

Is it called "the filter/strainer/cover/seive of my bathroom drain"?

This is the drain in my bathroom What is the piece of metal with many holes called? Is it called "the filter/strainer/cover/sieve of my bathroom drain" in casual everyday English?
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
2 answers
31 views

a buyer and seller and straw buyer

When X buys something, they are a buyer. When X sells something, they are a seller. What would they be called if they buy something on someone else's behalf? A straw buyer??? Note that X does not ...
xeesid's user avatar
  • 1,449
2 votes
2 answers
364 views

What's the contrary of "cherry picking"?

Cherry picking in artificial intelligence research (and in some other contexts) is the act of choosing examples of good (accurate, grammatical, etc.) predictions. I wonder which word or phrase ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
853 views

What is "a shirt with short sleeves" called?

Normally a Tshirt is made of cloth (I don't know what kind of cloth it is) that is soft and does not leave creases even though you don't iron it (see the picture above). A shirt is normally made of ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

is it correct to say "hold the toy fan blade-away"?

The person in the picture above "is holding the knife pointy-end down" and I think "pointy-end down" is an adverb. The person in the picture above "is holding the knife ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
1 vote
2 answers
973 views

What is the area for people to sit in a stadium called?

What is the area for people to sit in a stadium called? It seems to be called "stand", but I am not sure. But why "stand"?? because people can sit there too? Can we say "I was ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
8 votes
2 answers
972 views

What is a tight narrow space between things that are in tight contact with each other called in everyday English?

This is a picture of my sofa. There is a tight space between the arm and the seat of the sofa. If you have a cover, you can tuck the cover in this tight gap. Is that tight space called a gap? For ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
0 votes
2 answers
293 views

Better / proper translation of "包容" in English

I looked at the translation of "包容" in English, and both google translate and the collinsdictionary say it means "tolerate". However, that's not the meaning/message/idea I want to ...
xpt's user avatar
  • 2,288
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

Any other phrases similar to "Now I can die in peace"?

I picked this expression from the title of a book written by Bill Simmons (a famous sports personality.) I am looking for similar expressions, which natives use, like the title of book above Now I can ...
Max's user avatar
  • 8,824
2 votes
1 answer
125 views

Is it correct to say "we thread the bolt into the nut snugly"?

I asked this question on Quora How do we say "we screw the bolt into a nut in such a way that the thread of the bolt and the nut fit well together"? Quora is not a smart system. Whenever it ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
2 votes
1 answer
410 views

What is the British word for the American word "pop quiz"?

According to many dictionaries, "pop quiz" (American English) is like a surprise informal test without warning in advance to test if a student has studied at home. In Britain, one beautiful ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
2 votes
2 answers
94 views

Is it correct to say "Do not touch the rim of the toilet" or "Do not touch the lip of the toilet"?

My children sometimes touch the the rim of the toilet bowl as shown in the above picture as they have no idea how dirty it is. We often use "the lip/ rim of a cup/ a pot...". I am not sure ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
-2 votes
2 answers
84 views

Is it correct to say "You must get on/off the motorbike from the left side"

When my children get on/off the motorbike, I want them to start doing it by standing on the side that doesn't have the tailpipe or exhaust because the tailpipe might be very hot especially when the ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
-1 votes
1 answer
54 views

Using "impulse" instead of "reason" in "for some reason"

Can I use the expression "for some impulse" similar to "for some reason"? It doesn't sound right. How to use "impulse" correctly, when I want to mention the urge and not ...
Dávid Laczkó's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
3k views

What is the phrase expressing that someone promised to meet you, but then canceled the meeting without telling you in advance?

You friend promised to meet you, but he didn't turn up. Or a boy promised to pick a girl up at school but she waited and waited but he didn't come. This happens in many situations but we often see it ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
2 votes
1 answer
23 views

Clinical investigation?

In Portuguese, it is common to say that a patient is "undergoing an investigation" of their disease (meaning: the physician is trying to diagnose what they have, i.e., is "investigating&...
flen's user avatar
  • 589
1 vote
1 answer
164 views

Idiom for describing when you feel heavy and uncomfortable

I am asking for an idiom to describe follow feeling (It is called '찌뿌둥하다' in Korean): 'When we feel a little heavy and uncomfortable because of body aches and colds'
2510 박제열's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
345 views

Is it called a water shadow?

The sun light or bulb light shines into the water in a pool and causes some moving pictures on the wall or ceiling. Is it called a water shadow?
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Is it natural to say "Turn the bike so that you and it are side by side"?

Looking at the above picture, I am sure we can say "the woman is sitting on a chair and there is another chair opposite the woman" Now: ... You were sitting at a table. Your child parked ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.4k

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