Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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1answer
42 views

How to include one's affiliation within a text?

Mr James, who works for BBC, has reported on this. What else can we use in lieu of who works for BBC? How else can we express the same meaning? Can we say from BBC? What is the most formal version?
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2answers
50 views

“Slick in the eye”?

Is there such phrase in English as "slick in the eye" to have the meaning as "directly to the eye"? For example: "A glass bead hit him right in the eye." or "A glass bead hit him slick in the ...
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1answer
82 views

What are some terms for “spoiled crop”?

Are there specific terms for crop that has been ruined in some way? I'd especially enjoy a word/phrase for produce/crop that has over-ripened or rotted away.
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1answer
232 views

“If time remains” vs. “if any time remains”

I actually have three questions: If any time remains or if time remains, which one is true? For example: If (any) time remains we will take a look at that or "we take a look at that"? (In ...
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1answer
20 views

Invite over something

I'm planning to ask someone out for a chat over a coffee or something light. Is following lines correct and common english(US)? Can I invite you for a chat over coffee/tea? Can I invite you for a ...
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3answers
58 views

American equivalents of “repeat on” to describe food?

repeat verb 3 British [no object] (of food) be tasted intermittently for some time after being swallowed as a result of belching or indigestion. ‘that cucumber repeated on me for hours’ (...
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1answer
45 views

How to describe this kind of “highlight” in a video?

I want to describe some amazing (little) part of a video, although it may not be directly related to what the video want to convey. From my current search the word highlight is used for articles. So ...
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2answers
30 views

Is “driving in turn” a real/natural phrase?

Two people are going on a long trip (let's say 8 hours). The first guy drives the first 4 hours, and the other one drives the remaining 4 hours. Is it then OK to say they are driving in turn? Also, ...
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1answer
26 views

Introductory phrase describing the fact that the speaker and some others were surprised

To my biggest surprise and that of the others, he suddenly started speaking fluently in Japanese. or To my and others' biggest surprise, he suddenly started speaking fluently in Japanese. or ...
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2answers
73 views

What expressions are used to mean “people who usually meet to consume alcohol together”?

In my home language in a very informal situation the English term TABLE MATE is used for a group of people who get together usually to consume alcohol. Is this expression in use in English? Or else ...
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1answer
42 views

What do you call those hats that only cover the top of your head?

I'm not really referring to the Jewish hats. More like this one (usually worn by Chinese, I think): What's the name? I typed types of hats on Google, but it doesn't show in the images.
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2answers
334 views

Came across for taste

If I accidentally order a food and I loved its taste, can I say the following? This food came across unbelievably tasty!
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3answers
95 views

Word or short description for someone who roams around in his local city and knows about local lesser known places, events, things to do etc

Just like we use travellers or wanderlust or globe trotters etc for people who enjoy travelling out of their own city, I want a word for people who enjoy roaming about their own city and knowing local ...
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2answers
34 views

A phrase to validate one's awareness (or knowledge) about some event

I am looking for a phrase to validate other person's awareness about something in a formal and polite way, like: "Your alarm went off and disarmed right after. Are you aware of this?" Or: "...
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2answers
26 views

How to express the comparative degree of being in the south?

How to express the comparative degree of being on the south? -- Why is it not snowing now? Isn't it winter? -- Because we are not in New-York. We are in Miami! It's much lower down south! I ...
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1answer
31 views

How can I say that a program runs at high load on the computer?

I've found "demanding", but I'm not sure if it sounds natural when talking about computers..
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1answer
51 views

Saying or expression for “the mistake made by a clever person is worth a thousand mistakes”

In Arabic, we literally say: The mistake made by a clever person is worth a thousand. That is, is worth a thousand mistakes made by other people who are not clever. We use it to mean that people ...
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2answers
53 views

A term to mean a student who keeps order in the classroom

Is there a word in English for a student in a classroom, typically in elementary, middle, or high school, who would be in charge of keeping order in the absence of the teacher? This person is to tell ...
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2answers
56 views

An expression for challenging someone to prove their worth

A proverb that is common enough here and whose origin I'm not aware of, literally goes like: If you are a cock, crow aloud at daybreak; and if you are a hen, then lay your egg and shut up! I would ...
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1answer
68 views

How do I say that an investment program is set to last until 2025?

I have a sentence in Russian: Компания в рамках инвестиционной программы до 2025 года продолжает дальнейшее наращивание мощностей и объемов производства. My translation: The company is ...
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1answer
90 views

Name of a messenger service inside a big governmental agency, ministry

What do we call the department inside a govt. ministry that undertakes the relay of documentation, official letters, for instance, from outsiders (requests, application by companies, individuals)? ...
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1answer
39 views

Answering the “What is <the title>?” question with using only a class noun or a noun phrase

-- What is "The Catcher in the Rye"? -- It's a novel by the American writer J. D. Salinger. In the example above, the answer is given with using the class noun ("novel") and the identifying ...
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1answer
27 views

How to emphasize the fact that the second event is separated from the first one by a big time span?

How to emphasize the fact that the second event is separated from the first one by a big time span? For example: The arguments that you are presenting are quite ridiculous. Look, you delve into ...
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1answer
22 views

What do I call a curve of drug concentration vs. time if the concentration axis is on a log scale?

I have a number of curves of drug concentration vs. time. The time scale, on the horizontal (x) axis, is normal, while the concentration scale is logarithmic (the equidistant notches say 1000 ng/mL, ...
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2answers
37 views

One of the main ideas of this text

There is a chunk of text which can be summarized in one or more ideas. The idea is used as something that you learn, by reading that text. What is a word or what would be the best way of saying: one ...
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2answers
23 views

Describing the fact that the mentioned subject is not in the area of your responsibility

-- What can you tell me about Johnson's progress? Is his professionalism growing? -- How can I say anything about him? On the very second day of his employment, you moved him to the sales ...
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2answers
29 views

Describing the best attainment in someone's progress: Is “what I mostly pleased by with regard to his progress” okay?

Jack's sense of rhythm has improved a lot over this year, and his improvisation technics have increased, too. However, what I mostly pleased by with regard to his progress is his ability to keep ...
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2answers
52 views

Idiom request: “If the town's streets are crooked, then it's wrong to walk in straight lines.”

If the town's streets are crooked, then it's wrong to walk in straight lines. This is a literal translation of an Arabic expression. It subtly encourages people to follow suit when immoral behavior ...
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3answers
75 views

A word or phrase to describe a voiced guess

Here is a situation: One teacher conducts the same activity in class during the first ten minutes of each lesson: she shows the back side of a flashcard to the students, describes what is depicted ...
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4answers
2k views

How do you describe an anomaly in the car body! deformation? Sunken?

Suppose you had a very slight car accident and a point of the car's door looks as if it's pushed in, something like this However, without any scratches, just a simple anomaly that can be easily fixed....
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1answer
195 views

Using in general at the end of a sentence

Consider this sentence: In this experiment, we just want to corroborate our previous results. If we want to emphasize that we want to corroborate the results as a whole (e.g., if one or two ...
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1answer
36 views

Word/Phrase for searching for some support for something

How can we state that we are searching for some supporting evidence for something? For example, in the following sentence: This may cause some errors in the evaluations. However, we do not aim at ...
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1answer
65 views

What do we call the plastic that has bubbles on it?

As a child, I used to burst the bubbles on this thing: What do we call this thing in English? And how can we express the action of bursting bubbles on it (I mean the verb or phrase that we can use ...
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2answers
46 views

How to say one street branches from another?

My house is located on a side street that branches from a main street. If I wanted to formally write my home address, how should I do it? I'm thinking: [Side street name], branching from [main ...
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1answer
20 views

Common way of describing the fact that one topic overlaps with another one

What's the most common way of describing the fact that the subject matter being talked is overlapping with some other area? Precisely, what would you say below instead of "bridging on"? -- Why ...
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2answers
958 views

A word/phrase for “the youngest child of a family”

Is there an idiomatic word or phrase for the youngest child of a family? It may somewhat have a negative connotation since their parents usually infantilize them.
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3answers
563 views

Sentence using the term “good winds”

In Portuguese there is a way of saying "luck" or "good luck" by using the expression "good winds" (poetical and metaphorical). Now there is a context wherein I am supposed to say "good winds" meaning ...
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2answers
38 views

Apologizing informally

Is it appropriate to say 'Sorry for making this hard for you'? Some context: We tried to set up a time to meet but we have conflicting schedules so we decided to meet later at night.
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1answer
23 views

describing the degree of unexpectedness of a change in a person's behavior

By the end of this school year, he has become especially active in different science projects - a change that was really hard to expect in him in the very beginning. Is "a change that was really ...
1
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1answer
62 views

“Take more, throw further” - an idiom about a dumb work

There is a saying in Russian, which could be translated as: Take more, throw further, take a rest while it flies Initially, it was applied to a manual digging with a shovel to demonstrate that ...
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3answers
135 views

How to describe a person who understands jokes, but wouldn't naturally make jokes?

...and at the same time, she absolutely possesses no sense of humor! I mean she understands jokes and always laughs at them but unlike other students in this class, she is simply unable to make ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Do “a request to repeat the words” and “a task to construct a sentence” both qualify as “teacher's instructions”?

She is always more than ready to travel - be it a short trip to some town or a long flight by an airplane to another continent. Here both "short trip" and "a long flight" qualify as "travel" So, ...
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1answer
533 views

How should I say correctly about using a tap or faucet

How do we say when we try to use the tap in a kitchen or bathroom? Can I say "open the tap" or "turn on water"?
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2answers
119 views

Is “mopping a sidewalk” okay in English?

Would it be okay to say "mopping a sidewalk" when a sidewalk is being cleaned with water and mops or is there a better and a more common way of describing this action?
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1answer
53 views

What's the most common way of describing the action of putting asphalt on the road?

What's the most common way of describing the action of putting asphalt on the road? 1) The workers are laying asphalt on the road. 2) The workers are covering the road with asphalt. 3) The workers ...
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1answer
26 views

“newly-springing-up technologies”, is this phrase formed in the right manner?

I am writing a sentence like this: Music at the turn of the twentieth century was trying to abandon the traditional rules and restrictions and to embrace the newly-springing-up technologies, but ...
1
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1answer
31 views

How to ask about the remaining distance to my friend's house?

My friend and I have been walking for about 2 kilometers, and now I want to ask her about the remaining distance to the house. What is the usual way to go about this? I have these in mind: How far ...
0
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2answers
74 views

The friendship of auntie bear

There is a phrase in our language that its literal translation to English will be "The friendship of auntie bear". In order to explain when we use this phrase, I will tell you the story behind this ...
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3answers
2k views

An idiom for encouraging sucking up

How can I encourage a person to suck up even to the meanest of people, when doing so would benefit the person sucking up? In Arabic, an expression draws this image: If a dog has something you need, ...
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2answers
40 views

What are idiomatic terms for “out-of-class knowledge”?

I am trying to say that I used knowledge beyond what has been taught in the classroom, things I have learned from extra readings or research on my own. I can think of a couple possible terms but they ...