Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

176 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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Is it not ambiguous to say “the child is crying for Mom”?

I remember that people often say "don't cry for me" when "I" have some problem or I hurt and people feel sorry for "me" so they "cry for me". Let's say a child ...
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2answers
259 views

Do we say “She fell on her head”, “She fell with her head onto the floor”, “She fell and hit her head onto the floor”, “She dived into the floor”?

Ok, look at these pictures A man may have been in a standing position & suddenly fell off with his head coming into contact with the floor first before other parts of his body (back, legs, etc). ...
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1answer
94 views

How to say that creating account take place on a registration form?

I write user guide on English (foreign language to me). Web Application have form on separate page for new user registration. I need to build sentence to say about this, but can't find right words. ...
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1answer
15 views

What do you call a name that reflects the person's characteristics?

How to translate the Russian phrase 'говорящая фамилия'? It's literally translated as "speaking surname" and refers to last names that reflect the person's quality. For example, if a short ...
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1answer
41 views

A boy bends his knees a bit and then straighten his knees out repeatedly several times. Can we say “he is springy for fun”?

​springy (adj): returning quickly to the original shape after being pushed, pulled, stretched, etc. We walked across the springy grass. A boy bends his knees a bit and then straighten his knees out. ...
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24 views

When do we say “move it” and When do we say “move out of the way”?

This was the context I saw. A kid has been attending in an English speaking school in Vietnam (a non-English country) since the 1st grade. I am pretty sure that he can speak Vietnamese very well. His ...
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1answer
66 views

Is it idiomatic to say “don't bite me in the arm”?

We can say "to poke me in the arm" as stated in dictionaries. the verb "bite" is somehow similar to "poke" in its meaning because both mean to push into or through something. But I don't see the ...
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24 views

Threshold for starting/quitting/etc. is high / There is high bar for starting/etc

Firstly, I guess the phrases in the title are wrong, but it is difficult for me to formulate the question because I am trying to find a way to express something like in the title but I do not know how ...
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22 views

What is the general everyday term to express the interface between the door and the door frame?

Look at the picture Children often accidentally put their hands or fingers in the interface between the door and the door frame, which is dangerous because they might get crushed by chance. What is ...
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22 views

What's the proper phrase for “退一万步说(back-stepping ten thousand steps)” in English

The phrase "退一万步说(back-stepping ten thousand steps, or taking ten thousand steps back)" is normally used for stressing that the gap between the two sides are so wide, or the topics in discussion is so ...
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28 views

How to express “you are holding your bike and then walk, which makes the bike go with you”, do you say “I am carrying / taking / walking my bike”?

Say, you are not riding on your bike. Instead, you are holding it with your hands. You, then, walk, which makes the bike go with you. do you say "I am carrying / taking / walking my bike"? If we ...
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1answer
18 views

What word best describes “to move your hand over a surface while pressing firmly”?

rub [intransitive, transitive] to move your hand, or something such as a cloth, backwards and forwards over a surface while pressing firmly → stroke rub your nose/chin/eyes/forehead etc ...
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1answer
50 views

Bullet passed by my head

The bullet passed by my head by a difference of a few inches. I am trying to say that somebody fire a bullet at you that barely missed your head? Or Somebody fire a bullet that nearly hit me in the ...
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2answers
49 views

How to express this toddler behavior: “She always stares and seems to beg for food of other kids” or “She always sponges food from other kids”?

This is one of the common behaviors of toddlers. Toddlers may not want to eat food that their parents give to them. But when their parents take them to a group of other kids or people who are eating ...
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1answer
36 views

The output of an adapter

I'm trying to name a function in a software package. Let's start with some backgrounds. The package provides supplemental functions to multiple upstream packages that train random forests. To avoid ...
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1answer
70 views

Does it make sense to say “with the exam passed”?

I wonder if the sentence such makes sense? "I left the school with the exam (whatever this exam may be) passed" The part I am not sure about is the phrase "with the exam passed". I would like to ...
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1answer
395 views

Using in general at the end of a sentence

Consider this sentence: In this experiment, we just want to corroborate our previous results. If we want to emphasize that we want to corroborate the results as a whole (e.g., if one or two ...
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1answer
64 views

The variable “approaches” or “goes away from” 0?

I have some candidates for the former case(x -> 0): The variable approaches zero. The variable approximates to zero. The variable are closing zero. The variable becomes more and more equal to zero. ...
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2answers
641 views

Dialogue consisting of questions and answers?

Is there a specific word for a dialogue between two characters in a play or novel, where that dialogue only consists of questions and answers?
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1answer
60 views

Literary device for sound ending similar to the next word's beginning

What literary device is it if a word begins with the sound the previous word ends in? such as 'doubt' and 'truth' in: Doubt truth to be a liar.
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2answers
47 views

How to express my sold items are diverse?

In Czech, I would say there is a varied offer, would that be correct? What about diverse, various, miscellaneous, multifarious? Also, I didn't find any synonyms to offer in the business sense. Are ...
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3answers
2k views

use of idiom “to see eye to eye”

I wonder whether I could use "see eye to eye" when I agree with someone spontaneously like this, " I see eye to eye with you" or when I disagree with someone " I don't see eye to eye with you"
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1answer
131 views

I think that I used “A few” too often in this text - is the another way to say the same thing?

I am describing a part of literature in introduction of my paper with the following way(I studied on effect of blade thickness in CFD methods): A few authors experimentally investigated the effect ...
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1answer
127 views

Brain is equally important as brawn in sports

Any idioms/expressions/phrases which conveys the same idea in the title? Example: In badminton, it's not just how fast or hard you hit the shuttle but you also need to play with smartness to defeat ...
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2answers
34 views

Which is correct, “differently than” or “differently from”, or neither?

Which is correct, "sort compares strings differently from awk", or "sort compares strings differently than awk", or both are bad, and I should rephrase it?
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1answer
84 views

Short universal single expression for saying a kind of congratulations

My friend tells me that their physics teacher is such a good man, he's always so thoughtful of them to learn the lesson and answers all their questions patiently and as simply as possible, while our ...
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Word request for “someone meant to do something doesn't do it”

Talking about a surgeon, one said that Dr. Sam never did any surgery himself, rather he get it done by his assistants, that is to say, he is a surgeon only in copy and pen. In our native language we ...
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19 views

My child stands with her feet on my feet, I hold her hands to balance, I walk and move her. Is it ok to say “She's walking on my feet”?

My child stands with her feet on my feet, I hold her hands with my hands to keep balance, then I walk and thus move her along as shown in the picture. Is it correct to say "She's walking on my ...
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29 views

What is the word to express “to raise your both arms up and rotate them several rounds from back to front or the other way round”?

This is a very common warm-up exercise that most people do but I don't know how to say it. You raise your both arms up and rotate them from back to front or the other way round as shown in the picture....
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15 views

Do we say “the cap doesn't fit on the mouth of the bottle” or “the cap doesn't fit the mouth of the bottle”?

fit [intransitive, transitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) to be the right shape and size for somebody/something I tried the dress on but it didn't fit. That jacket fits well. My shoes fit ...
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1answer
21 views

Is it idiomatic to say “He sneaked the spider on his mom's shoes to freak her out”?

A child wanted to make his mom freak out by secretly putting a spider on Mom's shoes. I had no experience of using the verb "sneak", so I just followed the dictionary sneak: 2 TAKE/GIVE ...
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18 views

X lead you to Y

Is the following sentence correct grammatically? The knowledge that I have gained through reading various reports on the future of the workforce and the experience that I have had precipitated a ...
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1answer
34 views

Is it correct to say “hold the balloon by its handle, not by itself”?

You don't want your child to hold the balloon by holding itself because the balloon may get burst and it is not convenient. You don't want your child to hold the handle of the balloon. Is it correct ...
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19 views

You told a child that the boy's about to jump into the pool. Now, the boy has just jumped into it. Is it ok to say “there he goes” or “there you go”?

You and your child are watching a boy standing by the pool. You told your child that you expected the boy to jump into the pool in a few minutes. Now, the boy has just jumped into it. Is it okay to ...
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1answer
21 views

Do we say “the boy is turning the table around” or “the boy is spinning the table around”?

The boy is holding the corner of the table as shown in the above picture. He then goes around and around, which makes the table move around and around (many rounds). Do we say "the boy is turning ...
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34 views

Is it idiomatic to say “you can throw the ball by swinging your hand from bottom up / from top down” in everyday English?

There are 2 ways to throw a ball. -You can throw the ball by swinging your hand from bottom up as the man in red in the picture. or -You can throw the ball by swinging your hand from top down as the ...
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22 views

Are they correct to say “She's got 2 butterfly hairpins in / on her hair” and “She's got a hairband in / on her hair”?

Look at this picture Do we say "She's got 2 butterfly hairpins IN / ON her hair"? Look at this picture Do we say "She's got a hairband IN / ON her hair"?
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20 views

Is it okay to say “you screw the nut on the bolt to secure the net in the panel”?

This is a plastic basketball net for little children to play So, we have 3 things: the bolt which is a part of the net (ie, the bolt is sticking out from the net), the nut, and the panel with a hole ...
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1answer
19 views

Is it natural to say “the bar may slip OFF the table” or “the bar may slip ON the table”?

There is a wooden bar leaning on the edge of a table. Is it natural to say "the bar may slip OFF the table" or "the bar may slip ON the table"?
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1answer
18 views

Can we say “to put the leash on the dog”? or Do we always have to say “to put the dog on the leash”?

People say "Dogs must be kept on a lead (leash)" in the dictionary. on (prep) 5 ATTACHED attached to or hanging from something She hung her coat on a hook. Dogs must be kept on a lead (or ...
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1answer
21 views

'The Russia-Ukraine border' v. 'the Russia-Ukrainian border' v. 'the Russian-Ukrainian border'

Is it, for example, 'the Russia-Ukraine border', or 'the Russia-Ukrainian border', or 'the Russian-Ukrainian border'? How do I specify what countries it separates? Also, is there any rule or ...
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19 views

Is it natural to say “please play with your Lego in one place, don't play a bit here a bit there as you may lose your bricks”?

I came up with this structure "to play a bit here a bit there" I am not sure if it is what native speakers often say. Also, Is it natural to say "please play with your Lego in one place, don't play ...
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12 views

Are these expressions valid, “do you want to put the box over yourself?”, “do you want me to put the box over you?”, etc?

Some children like to play like this. That is they cover themselves with a big box. Are these expressions valid: -do you want to put the box over yourself? -do you want me to put the box over you? ...
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20 views

What are some common expressions with brick Lego when talking to a child, e.g, “to put a pyramid together”, “to take the pyramid apart”?

What are some common expressions with brick Lego when talking to a child? For example, Can we say "to put a pyramid together", "to take the pyramid apart", and "to build / make a pyramid with ...
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29 views

What word should I fill in the dotted line to make these 2 actions equivalent, “to put his head through the ring” and “to put the ring … his head”?

We say "to put his head through the ring" (1), and what prepositions should we fill in the dotted line to make this phrase "to put the ring … his head" equivalent to the (1).? "to put the ring ...
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11 views

What do you call different types of politicians' ratings?

This is a quite specific question. There are approval ratings ("Do you approve or disapprove of [the name of a politician]"), electoral ratings ("If elections were held this weekend, whom would you ...
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12 views

Would you please suggest some expressions with the same meaning as “is built around something”?

Suppose a background context as below There are three important and highly influential parameters. Therefore, the operating system is built around these three parameters. Now I am wondering which ...
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16 views

Is it natural to say to a child “So, you want to do like Tom swinging on his mom's leg, don't you?”?

Okay, your child has a friend named "Tom". Tom often swings on his mom's leg. That is he embraces his mom shin and the mom moves her leg up and down to make Tom move up an down in rhythm (see the ...
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16 views

What's the idiomatic way of describing the passage of a period of time equal to a few days?

What's the idiomatic way of describing the passage of a period of time equal to a few days? His ability to remember new words is just tremendous – he simply doesn’t need things to be repeated ...
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30 views

What are parties in a legal dispute called (collectively)?

Is it 'dispute sides' or something? How to say it, I forgot.