Questions tagged [phrase-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a phrase that fits a meaning. If you are looking for a word, or don't care, see the "word-request" tag too.

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Do you have an idiom that is similar to this “You don't scare / cry if you don't see the coffin”

This is literally translated from Vietnamese "You don't scare / cry if you don't see the coffin" which roughly means you underestimate things that are actually dangerous. For example, young people ...
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What is the word that expresses “the sound of a piece of metal hitting a hard object” (couldn't remember it, a “clan..” or something like that)?

What is the word that expresses "the sound of a piece of metal hitting a hard object"? It is often showed in the move subtitles. I couldn't remember it, a "clan..." or "clas..." or something like ...
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Is it idiomatic “She is sitting with her hand / hands under the chin / the temple / the cheek”, etc?

Look at these pictures & Is it idiomatic to say: 1- "She is sitting with her hand under the temple / chick" or "She is sitting with her temple / cheek on the hand" 2- "He is sitting with his ...
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When mom is going to work, the kid says “Mom, come home to / with me soon, ok”. Is that a correct expression?

When mom is going to work, the kid says: -"Mom, come home to / with me soon, ok". I am not sure "to or with" or -"Mom, come home soon and be with me, ok" But I remember I read this sentence ...
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Do you say “don't slap in the pee to make it be smeared all over the floor and splash it into my face”?

slap 4 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to hit a surface with a lot of force, making a loud sharp sound slap against Small waves slapped against the side of the boat. Today, my ...
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could I say “you can pull it open to separate them” in this specific situation?

pull 1 /pʊl/ ●●● S1 W1 verb 1 MOVE SOMETHING TOWARDS YOU [intransitive, transitive] to use your hands to make something or someone move towards you or in the direction that your hands are ...
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How to express “He puffed out his cheeks and at the same time spit out and possibly made some bubble sound”?

puff out 1. PHRASAL VERB If you puff out your cheeks, you make them larger and rounder by filling them with air. He puffed out his fat cheeks and let out a lungful of steamy breath. [...
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Do we say “His pants are holed in several places” & “his pants are split open at the back”?

split [intransitive, transitive] to tear, or to make something tear, along a straight line Her dress had split along the seam. split something Don't tell me you've split another pair of ...
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Are there any synonyms/alternatives for the phrase “so much for (something)”?

I'm struggling to find any similar expressions to indicate my disappointment with a subject or show that it's not true anymore. Could someone provide any suchlike locutions, please?
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What is the opposite expression of “to stack the cups up”?

stack 1 (also stack up) [intransitive, transitive] to make things into a neat pile, or to form a neat pile The assistants price the items and stack them on the shelves. a stacking hi-fi ...
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Can we say “He wiped the cloth on his mouth” instead of the common version “He wiped his mouth with the cloth”?

wipe 1 /waɪp/ ●●● S3 verb 1 CLEAN/RUB [transitive] a) to rub a surface with something in order to remove dirt, liquid etc wipe something with something Wipe the table with a damp ...
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What is your response when your child asks “Daddy, ### (unidentified words)?”: What are you asking?; What are you asking about? etc?

ask 1 /ɑːsk $ æsk/ ●●● S1 W1 verb 1 QUESTION [intransitive, transitive] to speak or write to someone in order to get an answer, information, or a solution ‘What’s your name?’ she asked. ...
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Terms for two different kinds of payments in a private school

In a private school they separate the payment that parents have to make into: 1) paying for utilities - that is, paying for electricity, textbooks, lunch, teaching tools, uniform, etc; and 2) ...
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Is there a word for someone who loves authority?

I'm trying to think of a word to describe a person who loves/sucks up to authority figures. I'm hoping for a phase like "boot licker" but without the police authority context. Any ideas?
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Do we have a term that is a combination of “sitting / standing side by side” and “sitting / standing back to back”?

if two people stand or sit back to back, they stand or sit with their backs facing or touching each other The children sat back to back so they couldn't see each others' drawings. side by ...
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“two pens differing in color” - proper way to describe this in English

I want the recipient of my note to bring two pens with them with the ink color of the first pen being different from that of the second. What is the most natural way to put my request in English? ...
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How to idiomatically express “to make the ballpoint tip of a pen stick in” in simple terms to a child?

Have a look at the picture My child sometimes plays with pens, which could be dangerous because the ballpoint tip of the pen may poke him in the eyes. How to idiomatically express "to press the end ...
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How to express “In-toeing & Out-toeing” in simple terms to a child?

When feet turn inward — a tendency referred to as walking "pigeon-toed" — doctors call it in-toeing. When feet point outward, it's called out-toeing. (from kidshealth.org) How to express "In-toeing &...
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How to express to turn a thing back to its normal / correct position when currently it is “inside-out” or “back to front”?

right side up ​(North American English) with the top part turned to the top; in the correct, normal position I dropped my toast, but luckily it fell right side up. upside down: ​in or into a ...
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Is it idiomatic to say “you're eating like you're starving”?

be starving (also be starved American English) to be very hungry You must be starving! When a person eat quickly and take large mouthfuls of food because he is starving. What is the idiomatic ...
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is it ok to say “if you bend / duck your head all the way down onto the floor right after meal like that, you may throw up”?

​duck [intransitive, transitive] to move your head or body downwards to avoid being hit or seen He had to duck as he came through the door. duck (down) (behind/under something) We ducked ...
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Do we say “you need good manual dexterity” or “you need to be skillful”?

​dexterity (uncount): skill in using your hands or your mind You need good manual dexterity to be a dentist. mental/verbal dexterity skillful (adj): ​(of a person) good at doing something,...
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Is “screw your eyes/face <->up” used with negative or positive expression? or is it just a “literal expression” without any “figurative implication”?

screw your eyes/face <->up: ​to pull the muscles of your eyes or face tight because the light is too strong, you are in pain, etc. He took a sip of the medicine and screwed up his face. ...
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Would you say “to face the screen of the smartphone downwards” or “ to turn the smartphone upside down”?

right side up ​(North American English) with the top part turned to the top; in the correct, normal position I dropped my toast, but luckily it fell right side up. upside down: ​in or into a ...
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What is this action called: a kid protrudes his lips and makes a sound like a mouse?

squeak /skwiːk/ [intransitive] to make a short high sound that is not very loud My new shoes squeak. The mouse ran away, squeaking with fear. One wheel makes a horrible squeaking noise. ...
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Do we say “you need to strap or fasten the canopy after folding the umbrella so that it won't unfold”?

strap somebody/something + adv./prep. to fasten somebody/something in place using a strap or straps He strapped the knife to his leg. Everything had to be strapped down to stop it from ...
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How to express this action: Do not put the cake vertically to eat, put it horizontally?

My toddler often puts the cake vertically to eat, as shown in the below picture It is hard for him to eat if he does like that, I want him to put the cake horizontally to eat like the below picture ...
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How to say I've succeeded against all the odds of someone

Usually a successful person thanks to his wife or parents for his success during a public speaking. On the other hand, what if someone becomes successful while his spouse/parents always discouraged ...
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what is a general common term for swollen pots on your skin (like a mosquito bite, for example)?

spot [usually plural] a small mark or lump on a person’s skin, sometimes with a yellow head to it The baby's whole body was covered in small red spots. He had a large spot on his nose. ...
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does it sound like a native when we say “Do not leave / put your scooter untidily in the middle of the living room like that”?

does it sound like a native when we say "Do not leave / put your scooter untidily in the middle of the living room like that, please put it in the corner of the room"? I am not a native, so sometimes ...
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do we say “he is checking in to the building” to express someone is wiping his magnetic card on the security system to get in?

check in [phrasal verb] 1 : to report to someone when you arrive at a place (such as an airport or convention) to let them know you are there Passengers must check in one hour before the ...
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is it idiomatic to say “to walk / run / climb up straight, don’t slouch” like when we say “Sit up straight, don’t slouch.”?

straight (adv): 2 POSITION in a level or correct position Sit up straight, don’t slouch. People often say "Sit up straight, don’t slouch" or "Stand up straight, don’t slouch". My question is, ...
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Do we say “lift your left leg off the floor” when you just actually fold the shin and make it parallel to the ground?

Ok, look at the picture, there are 2 movements The first movement, the person seems to lift his leg off the floor, the knee goes forward and the thigh & the shin form a triangle. The second ...
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“Not want to hurt” synonyms

I want to express that people act in a way that they do 'not want to hurt/harm' a company. However, I wonder if there is another way to express it without a reference to physical suffering. As people ...
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What is the opposite action of “You fought with your sister over the toy”: “you sacrificed the toy for your sister.”?

fight [intransitive, transitive] to struggle physically with somebody My little brothers are always fighting. He taught me how to fight with a sword. fight with somebody Riot police ...
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What is the opposite movement of “go into the shade of the wall”: “go into the sunny area”?

shade: [uncountable] an area that is dark and cool under or behind something, for example a tree or building, because the sun’s light does not get to it shade of something The shade of the ...
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What should I say “Do not step on your spit!”?

spit: [uncountable] the liquid that is produced in your mouth SYNONYM saliva Ok, my little child has just been fed some food. Now, he spat some out onto the floor. I don't want him to step on the ...
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What are common adjectives to express a person who is difficult, unfriendly, likes to argue, do not cooperate? harsh or sharp-tongued or shrewish?

Some people are very difficult, unfriendly, likes to argue, disagree, do not cooperate, often talk with loud voice. What are common adjectives to express these kinds of people? harsh or sharp-...
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What is this action called? He is teasing me?

tease [intransitive, transitive] tease (somebody) | tease (somebody) + speech to laugh at somebody and make jokes about them, either in a friendly way or in order to annoy or embarrass them Don'...
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do you say “walk sloppily” to express someone who walks in a tired or lazy manner.?

Ok, a person may walk like this -He may slouch -He may tilt his body from side to side while walking -He may arch his back forward or backward while walking. -He may look down at the ground, or up ...
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What to call a troll who persistently annoys others through jargon

Not too long ago, I've encountered this god awful 'troll' on Discord who tends to provoke others without a break. The person would compose paragraphs of endless blasphemy purposely for the attention ...
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What are vocabulary relating to “umbrella”?

um‧brel‧la /ʌmˈbrelə/ ●●● S3 noun [countable] 1 Image of umbrellaan object that you use to protect yourself against rain or hot sun. It consists of a circular folding frame covered in cloth → ...
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How to express “to slide out of your hand”?

In the dictionary slip [intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to slide out of position or out of your hand His hat had slipped over one eye. The fish slipped out of my hand. The child slipped ...
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do we say “She tripped over her dress / skirt” or “she was entangled in her dress / skirt”?

When a women wears a long dress or skirt, one or both of her feet may accidentally step on it & that may make her tumble. See this picture trip 2 ●●○ verb (tripped, tripping) 1 FALL (also ...
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Is it correct to say “postpone a partially done task”

We can definitelly say "to postpone a task" if the task hasn't been started yet. Could you please explain whether it is correct to say "to postpone a task" if there is already some progress on the ...
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How to express these actions in English: She is hanging / swinging on the roof of the castle?

These are the actions. There is a plastic castle for children to play like this picture My question is that How to express these actions in English Action 1: a child puts his both hands on the ...
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Asking about a student's school performance rank in class (in Asia setting)

Teachers in Asia usually rank their students according to their academic performance in class. Thus, if there are, say, 23 students in one class, there will be 23 "places," place 1 being the place for ...
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Walking to someone

Id like to know if these various sentences about walking to someone mean the same thing I’m walking up to her. I’m walking towards her. Im walking to her. I’d appreciate knowing other ways to say ...
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41 views

Expressions to refer to some point in the future

Which of the following expressions is idiomatic and\or grammatical? I think I will be busy until I become 45 or something. By that time, my children will be mature enough to depend more on ...
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Idiom to express “solution to any kind of problems”?

I want to know if there exists an idiom that conveys the meaning of one solution fitting all problems in all scenarios? What swim into my mind are two phrases: 1) silver bullet, 2) one size fits all....