Questions tagged [phrase-usage]

This tag is for questions about how to use a particular phrase. If your question is a request for a phrase to use, you should use the "phrase-request" tag.

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2answers
25 views

What does the phrase 'have the greater knowledge' mean?

In the following sentence, does the phrase 'have the greater knowledge' mean 'understand well'? "We all know that books burn, yet we have the greater knowledge that books cannot be killed by fire. ...
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0answers
16 views

Do I have to use 'due to the fact' or 'by the fact'

Could someone please tell me whether I have to use 'due to' or 'by' in the following phrase? This tone is mainly created due to/by the fact that the video contains real footage of wars and attacks ...
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1answer
19 views

Is it correct to say “someone's heart is with us”?

Is it correct to say "someone's heart is with us"? I'm trying to translate a piece of text to English and I really don't know whether that is correct or not. The source text is saying that someone is ...
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1answer
12 views

Us all in This story has a useful lesson for us all

This story has a useful lesson for us all In this sentence, need to know the use of us all...
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2answers
31 views

What is difference between “don't remember” and “not that remember”

Recently, I came across this use of the phrase: not that I remember. I have not encountered such use before. I have always come across the classic use of the phrase: I don't remember. Is there any ...
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0answers
12 views

Can I call this “extra” classes?

Recently, I attended an AI boot camp. Since I already knew most of the concepts being taught, the instructors arranged separate special advanced classes for me and a few others. So, I attended these ...
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1answer
14 views

You can't help but

I know that there's a phrase "You can't help but do something". Eg. "You can't help but smile." But is "You can't help but have your legs tremble" example viable? I mean does it sound off to an ...
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2answers
32 views

“As opposed to” and “contrary to” in the beginning of sentences

Can I open a sentence with "As opposed to" and "contrary to"? I always heard them in the middle of sentence but not in the beginning of it, and that's why I'm not sure about it. Examples: As ...
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1answer
32 views

How to say “Stay where you are” in this context?

I'm writing a kind of a little senario. A child was running. There was a stone in the road so he felt. His leg hurt. A doctor was passing by and said: You will be okay. You just need to sit here ...
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1answer
34 views

The aisle seat is fine by me?

I found this phrase on a Mobil app,And I did not understand why it wrote "by me" and not "for me" She: I will check if there is one available. Me: if not,the aile seat is fine by me.
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0answers
17 views

Alternate definition of “type up” in a historical context

I found an alternate use of "type up," and to my avail, I cannot find this use anywhere else online. I saw this in a 1928 letter, with "type up with" meaning "meet the standards/requirements of" Eg: ...
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1answer
27 views

The use of 'as a cosmetic'

I have found a sentence on line. I'm confused with the use of the word 'cosmetic' in the sentence. In a dictionary, it is described as a noun (usually plural) and an adjective. Please explain it to me ...
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0answers
30 views

When should I say I apologize and when should I say I am sorry?

Is it related with the size of the wrong I did it or with the respect of the person or something else? I made some researches and I found that : An apology is a formal admission of a wrongdoing....
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0answers
12 views

How to describe the snow covering the city?

I am trying to write sentences on the beginning of snowfall and city getting covering in the snow. Here are the three variants, but the first two variants sound weird. Can someone please correct them ...
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5answers
2k views

Can I say “guess what” to acknowledge new information?

I can't remember where I got this from, but it feels deeply correct to me. However it caused a misunderstanding in a chat, and after googling the usage and not finding anything I'm suspecting I might ...
2
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2answers
393 views

Is it possible to pull or pull out a machine gun if it's already in your hand?

Is it possible to pull or pull out a machine gun if it's already in your hand? He pulled (out) his machine gun and fired at the police.
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1answer
51 views

What is the difference between what's up and how are you?

When should I say what's up and when should I say how are you? Is it about the person's age or the extent of my knowledge of the person?
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1answer
20 views

Professionally, which is better? May I tell him who is calling OR may I ask who is calling? [closed]

Professionally, which is better? May I tell him who is calling OR may I ask who is calling?
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2answers
55 views

Exclamation with “What or How”

How does it say correctly with exclamation? How she looks! or What she looks!
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1answer
37 views

meaning of the phrase [duplicate]

Can this phrase be used this way?: to mock at someone who said some kind of nonsense or the way what he did or the way how he looks. Or is it possible? For example: I can't with/from your stupid ...
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1answer
38 views

The use of “check” or “check on” in context

Tell me please if I need to use check or check on in the following context. I am not sure if the facts he cited are true, so I had better check/check on them. If both are correct there, then what ...
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5answers
3k views

Someone said to me, “We basically literally did.” What were they trying to express to me?

Someone said to me, "We basically literally did." What were they trying to express to me? Also, can basically and literally be used in the same sentence? My points to my language partner: ...
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1answer
32 views

Difference between “don't have + noun” and “don't have any + noun”

In negative sentences, what is the difference between the forms "don't have + noun" and "don't have any + noun"? Here are two couples of examples: (With countable nouns) I don’t have books I ...
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1answer
17 views

Not to forget something or …?

How do we say correctly the following? For not to forget about it he wrote a reminder to his agenda. for not to forget sounds strange, what is the correct way to say it?
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0answers
34 views

What that means by “I am willing to try the code as is”?

My colleague and I have been working on a software project. I recently proposed some changes to the code base and requested for his review. He then added some comments as below: Now that I see you ...
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1answer
23 views

What's the meaning of phrase 'or is it?'

What's the meaning of this phrase in this following sentence, 'This is a good book. Or is it?' As a learner of English, I've recently come across some phrases which can't be found in any of the good ...
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2answers
23 views

Is it correct to ask: What is there?

Is it correct to ask: "What is there on the table / in your bag?" or is it better to ask: "What is on the table / in your bag?" Which one sounds more natural or colloquial?
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1answer
35 views

Do something or To do something?

Consider a simple to-do list: To make exercises. To call Jane. To buy wine. or Make exercises. Call Jane. Buy wine. Which version is correct/better? Does they have a difference in their meaning? ...
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2answers
41 views

Is it ok to say 'come out as a winner'? [closed]

Grammatically, semantically, there seems to be nothing wrong with it, but Google News finds only several thousand search results. Why? (please, don't ask for context, it's perfectly clear as it is)
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1answer
19 views

Do the phrases “this once” and “this time” mean the same?

Do this time and this once mean the same? For example: I have never allowed you to use my car but this time/this once. If the phrases are identical in meaning, then which once is more common?
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2answers
40 views

“Pull out a win”

Nevertheless, the Cubs felt giddy about pulling out the win. Anthony Rizzo described it as a season-defining moment. (source) This line sounds strange, even jarring, to me. To pull out of something ...
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0answers
20 views

Is there any difference between the phrases “as far as something is concerned”, “as far”, “as to” and “regarding” and “concerning”?

Is there any difference between the phrases as far as something is concerned, as for, as to, regarding and concerning? For example: As far as money is concerned, I have enough. What if I swaped ...
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0answers
28 views

Is 'Being bid for' correct English

Is the phrase 'being bid for' correct? For example: All documents pertaining to the contract that is being bid for.
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1answer
43 views

Is it actually correct to say “They felt themselves quieter”?

I read many times that one shouldn't say: "I feel myself well/badly" etc, because it's incorrect and the native speakers think that you're saying about touching yourself or masturbating. But recently ...
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1answer
35 views

Can we use “get to know” in the past?

The phrase "get to know someone" is pretty much used in the present but can I use it in the past? In that case is it written as: I got to know him at the time but things have changed over the years.
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2answers
56 views

Known As, Better known as, Best known as

Consider: John Wilkes Booth is known as the man who killed President Lincoln. Durian is known as the king of fruits.` She is known as an actress. I want to be known as the guy I really am. ...
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1answer
24 views

Proper way for asking to leave

I am about to take an assesment for responsible service of alcohol licence. There is a video question and I need to tell someone to leave in that video. Once I saw a scene in The Simpsons and there ...
2
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2answers
34 views

How to use “occasional” as a doer of a particular activity?

Is it correct to say for example: "I am an occasional music composer"? I mean is it correct to use occasional as a maker or doer of something? I have already checked the Merriam Webster Dictionary ...
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2answers
41 views

How do you use “no way” in a conversation?

How do you use "no way" words? Example: My classmate usually goes to school late. One day she goes to school early. I think surprised can I tell to her "No way!" Is this polite?
16
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7answers
4k views

What is it called when at university there are two subjects being held at the same time?

For example, I need to enroll in two different courses at university, but there is a schedule in which both are held. Is it an 'overlapped schedule' or something similar? Is there a proper expression ...
0
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1answer
49 views

“prior to studying” or “prior to study”

I am currently a sophomore year student in Computer Science at the university and i want to start writing my CV. I want to mention in the introduction to my CV that I was once a QA at several Hi-Tech ...
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0answers
12 views

Can we use this expression? : a less carbon footprint [closed]

Which is better? a less carbon footprint vs. a smaller carbon footprint? Are both grammatical?
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1answer
16 views

“in the most important of several staffing changes”

"Severus Snape, long-standing Potions master at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, was today appointed Headmaster in the most important of several staffing changes at the ancient school. ..." ...
6
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4answers
1k views

Ambiguity - Should it be “mindful of committing logical fallacies” or “mindful of not committing logical fallacies”?

From Collins, If you are mindful of something, you think about it and consider it when taking action. When I am writing, I am always mindful of committing logical fallacies (e.g., red herring, ...
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1answer
31 views

Meaning of the phrase “at least initially” [closed]

What does the phrase "at least initially", as used in these examples, mean? The attention, at least initially, surprised them. At least initially, few donors seemed to agree. But the real ...
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1answer
24 views

Can I express a trend like this?

This city has experienced a decrease of 1% per year in the visibility, a meteorological parameter partly affected by atmospheric pollution. I would like to include the parenthetical clause to ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Phrase-usage: Where has this come from? Or Where did this come from?

Something that is confusing me is: Hey dude, Where has this come/ did this come from? I know how to use Present Perfect, but, I don't know if using here sounds natural. Can I use both? But, of ...
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2answers
33 views

In a week versus After a week

"I'll be back in a week" means "I'll be back after a week has passed" or "I'll be back after the next seven day's period is over". I was very much wondering if "I'll be back after a week" is also ...
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0answers
19 views

About the usage of “about the same” in this context

Jim, Jack, Raul, Kim, Beti are the members of this group. Jim spent 100 euros, but Jack spent 10 euros. About the same difference is between Jim and each of the other members. The last sentence ...
2
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1answer
52 views

Is “shut up” a noun phrase in “James is getting a bit frustrated shut up here”?

James is getting a bit frustrated shut up here, he tries not to show it but I can tell - also, Dumbledore's still got his Invisibility Cloak, so no chance of little excursions. Harry Potter and ...