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Questions tagged [phrase-usage]

This tag is for questions about how to use a particular phrase. If your question is a request for a phrase to use, you should use the "phrase-request" tag.

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How do we express that you are riding a motorbike / a bike / a horse with your friend sitting behind you on it?

Look at the verb "ride" in the dictionary [transitive, intransitive] to sit on and control a bicycle, motorcycle, etc. ride something + adv./prep. The boys were riding their bikes around ...
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Do we say “the rope, the hair or the rubber band are broken or cut or split”?

This is a rubber band And this is a rubber band that was cut Also, look at the picture Do we say "The rubber band / rope is broken or cut or split"? or do we have other specific terms to express ...
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How to say when you want to delay a state: to suppress my pee / poo / cough / laugh / smile / anger / giggle / pain / excitement / etc?

How to say when you want to delay a state? hold somebody/something ↔ up to delay someone or something Sorry I’m late – I was held up at work. suppress something to prevent yourself from ...
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A boy ran into a chair & made the chair fall off, can we say “you fell the chair”?

fall [intransitive] to suddenly stop standing She slipped on the ice and fell. A tree fell, just missing his car. fall + adv./prep. I fell over and cut my knee. The house looked as ...
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What is the opposite action of “You fought with your sister over the toy”: “you sacrificed the toy for your sister.”?

fight [intransitive, transitive] to struggle physically with somebody My little brothers are always fighting. He taught me how to fight with a sword. fight with somebody Riot police ...
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Can we say “I turned the switch off and the light went out” and “I flipped / flicked the switch off and the light went out”?

flick ​[transitive] to press a button or switch quickly in order to turn a machine, etc. on or off SYNONYM flip flick something He flicked a switch and all the lights went out. flick ...
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Do we say “the monk has no hair” or “he is hairless” or “he is bald” or “he has a shaved head”

bald adjective: having little or no hair on the head He started going bald in his twenties. young men who go prematurely bald hairless adjective: without hair You are walking with your ...
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“For many years now” and “For some years now” meaning

I want to know the meaning and the differences of these particular phrases: for many years now / for many times now for some years now / for some times now can anyone also provide an implementation ...
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What's the difference between “insight of something” and “insight into something”?

I use the phrase insight of for the sentence "It gives me an insight of what college life should like." but Grammarly change it into "an insight into". Under which content we use them?
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What does “facilitated a crescendo” mean?

I was watching the British series Sex Education and, in the second episode of season two, the main character uses the phrase "facilitated a crescendo". While I understand the definition of both words, ...
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What should I say “Do not step on your spit!”?

spit: [uncountable] the liquid that is produced in your mouth SYNONYM saliva Ok, my little child has just been fed some food. Now, he spat some out onto the floor. I don't want him to step on the ...
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What are these called: to purse your lips?

purse your lips: to form your lips into a small tight round shape, for example to show that you do not approve of something Look at these 3 pictures: Are they all "purse your lips"?
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is it idiomatic to say “Please spare your gut for dinner”?

This is one of my child's problems. That is he often eats cakes, snacks, etc before main meals (lunch, dinner) and therefore he has no appetite when coming to lunch / dinner. My mother tongue is ...
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How to Talk About Making Pancakes

I've found the following definitions and I'm wondering how they're used with pancakes and other objects. flip 2 : to cause (something) to turn or turn over quickly [+ object] She was sitting in the ...
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Introducing a paragraph with “that way”

May I use "that way" at the beginning of a paragraph, referring to the idea which was mentioned in the previous paragraph? For instance: That way, it is possible to conclude that...
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How do we express this position: to lie across the rail bars?

Look at the picture Do we say "they are lying across the rail bars"? Also, see this picture Do we say "the cat is lying across the bar"? Or what are the idiomatic way of saying that?
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Is it idiomatic to say “push something halfway / completely into something”?

Look at this picture When I tell my toddler put the straw into the milk box, she often push it completely into the box. And as a result, the straw got lost inside the box. What should we express in ...
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how to express this position in English: “to put your feet up”?

Look at these pictures and People often put one of their lower legs and rest it on the thigh of the other leg. Sometimes, that action is just his habit, but it could be that he want to relax when ...
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Do we say “to sing the toddler to pee / poo” or do we have similar common terms in English?

This is common in Asia, but I am not sure if it is in Western country. That is some parents in Asia don't want to put diapers on their toddlers. Instead, they often find a suitable time to take their ...
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Are “I am relaxing” and “I am relaxed” the same?

"Relax" is a complicated verb because of its meanings. re‧lax /rɪˈlæks/ ●●● S3 W3 AWL verb 1 REST [intransitive, transitive] to rest or do something that is enjoyable, especially after you ...
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will vs would usages methods

There would be no selective reduction. vs There will be no selective reduction. The meaning of both sentences is the same. So why should we use would instead of will? 2nd sentence I would say ...
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Do we say “Glass Crumb” just as we often say “Food Crumb”? If not, what is the word to say?

crumb (n): a very small piece of food, especially of bread or cake, that has fallen off a larger piece She stood up and brushed the crumbs from her sweater. ok, now I want to change the ...
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What are common adjectives to express a person who is difficult, unfriendly, likes to argue, do not cooperate? harsh or sharp-tongued or shrewish?

Some people are very difficult, unfriendly, likes to argue, disagree, do not cooperate, often talk with loud voice. What are common adjectives to express these kinds of people? harsh or sharp-...
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is it wrong to say “to clean your pee” when you want to mean “to remove it”?

clean [transitive, intransitive] clean (something) to make something free from dirt or dust by washing or rubbing it to clean the windows/bath/floor to clean a wound Have you cleaned ...
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As commonly done vs As is commonly done vs As it is commonly done

Which of the following three is the correct usage of the phrase? As commonly done As is commonly done As it is commonly done To me, 3rd one seems to be most appropriate from a grammatical ...
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how do I suggest politely to get back to me at a later time?

I have sometimes the need to tell other people to get back to me at a later time and I don't know how to express that correctly in English For example, if I'm invited to participate in a project and ...
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Are “to take the little child to go out” the same as “to take the little child out”?

take [transitive] to go with somebody from one place to another, especially to guide or lead them take somebody It's too far to walk—I'll take you by car. take somebody to something A boy ...
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Are “It is rainy now” and “it is raining now” the same? Also what is the verb equivalent to the adjective “sunny”?

This is a little bit confusing. rainy (adj): having or bringing a lot of rain a rainy day the rainy season the rainiest place in Britain Ad other dictionary rain‧y /ˈreɪni/ ●●● ...
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Website of online food ordering

Are there any difference between phrases below which were written with “of” and without “of”? Is the first one written with “of “ correct and does it have same meaning? 1)The UK-based website of ...
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“from my end” vs “from my side”

Today my manager finished his speech with: "I'm done from my end. If you have anything from your end, please let me know." My question is, wouldn't it be appropriate to use from my/your side than ...
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About Asian ancestor worship, do we say “he is praying for his grandpa” or “he is worshipping his grandpa”?

Ancestor worship is very popular in Asia. Asian people take great care in preserving the memories of their ancestors and honoring them with regular prayers and offerings. Ancestor worship is such an ...
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If your little child didn't want to wear his bottoms, what would you say: “You're so ashamed” or “Shame on you” in a form of joking?

I am teaching my little child to speak English, but I am not a native speaker. So, Sometimes, when I face a situation, I may use structures or words that are weird. Native people wouldn't say like ...
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Two different way to say a phrase

My computer was delivered with the screen broken. My computer was delivered in a broken-screened state. What I want to say is first sentence . Today an english teacher told me that second ...
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How to express this action in English? “Please, don't face up drinking like that” or “Please, don't drink with the bottle being upside down like that”

Ok, My little daughter always drinks by facing up & holding the water bottle upside down like this picture. This is not good because she may choke on the water. I want her to drink like the man ...
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Usage of check up with verbs

I know that I can use, give a check up, get a check up or have a check up. ( medical) . But can I use the phrase. ...take a check up. If so , what would the meaning be? Place help
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Do we say “The rat ran to and then under the ticket booth” or just “The rat ran under the ticket booth”?

Look at this picture, a rat was at a distance from the ticket booth. The suddenly, the rat ran towards the booth and then sneaked under the booth. The dictionary says under (prep) in, to or ...
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Are they the same? “to sit / lie there” vs “to sit / lie on there”?

Are they the same? "to sit / lie here" vs "to sit / lie on here"? "There" can be a noun or an adverb there [noncount] 1 : that place Get away from there. there 2 /ðeə $ ðer/ ●●...
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How to express “to slide out of your hand”?

In the dictionary slip [intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to slide out of position or out of your hand His hat had slipped over one eye. The fish slipped out of my hand. The child slipped ...
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How to improve English speaking

I am not a native English speaker. I have been preparing for the IELTS exam since last six months. I can write English properly. But I cannot speak English fluently. I make several mistakes while ...
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Do we say “She fell on her head”, “She fell with her head onto the floor”, “She fell and hit her head onto the floor”, “She dived into the floor”?

Ok, look at these pictures A man may have been in a standing position & suddenly fell off with his head coming into contact with the floor first before other parts of his body (back, legs, etc). ...
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Can I use a phrase 'financial relief' in an essay? Does this phrase make sense in english?

This option brings a financial relief particularly to the owners of uninsured pets.
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Difference between “related to” and “associated with”

What is the difference between associated with and related to such as: This degree is (related in / associated with) an increase.
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do we say “wrap it up” when we want our kids to stop playing games or watching TV?

wrap up | wrap it up ​(slang) usually used as an order to tell somebody to stop talking or causing trouble, etc. Now it's time for lunch & your children are playing games, watching TV or doing ...
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Do we say “you infected me with your disease” or “you transmitted your disease to me” or other common ways to express the same idea?

In the dictionary infect (verb) to make a disease or an illness spread to a person, an animal or a plant infect somebody/something It is not possible to infect another person through ...
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Do we say “pull the canopy close” or “pull the canopy closed” or “pull the canopy shut”?

in The dictionary, "close" is an adjective, "closed" is also an adjective, "shut" is an adjective and it is the synonym of "closed" close 14 WITH LITTLE SPACE with little or no space around ...
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Use of in thickness

I need to buy plastic sheet in bulk . And those are sold in two layers but while ordering I need to say thickness of one layer . In this case can I say; I need plastic sheet of 2 microns in one ...
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are “put on your top / bottoms” more common than “put on your Tshirt / shirt / tank top / pants / shorts …” in English in casual daily situations?

I am not a native speaker. I found that it is easier for me to say this to my daughter when we go out "Sweetie, please put on your top / bottoms" than "Sweetie, please put on your Tshirt / shirt / ...
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The use of “If you give an inch, they'll take a mile.”?

(A fictional situation) I want to give a warning to someone about something I experienced because they are in a situation I had been through. That they will lose if they make a concession..In that ...
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air of something

Fay assumed an air of innocence. (Source) He assumed an air of concern. (Source) What does "air of something" mean in these contexts? I suppose it is generally used with the verb "assume"
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“Call a taxi” and “Call for a taxi” is the same?

I want to make a question sentence like the below "Is calling a taxi is the only way to take a taxi here? (Or from here?)" and wonder if 'calling for a taxi" would mean same as "calling a taxi". ...