Questions tagged [phrases]

A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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1answer
18 views

How to tell someone to “experience it to the maximum”?

What is the most natural way to say something like "put your senses on the maximum level"? Could I say: a) Breath it in with all of your senses? b) Pull it in with all of your senses?
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0answers
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“Let's draw lots for it” vs “Let's draw straws for it” when deciding at random

Imagine there are two people who want to play a game. Each one wants to play first, so you or one of them suggests that the first player will be decided randomly using any random device, and says: ...
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0answers
17 views

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs?

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs? I think I’m asking that probably because some transitive verb phrases goes before prepositions.
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1answer
16 views

Hasn’t it though?

Sorry I’m a beginner of English. May I ask what does “hasn’t it though” mean in a reply?
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2answers
55 views

Is the framing of the sentence wrong?

So I was guiding a user to perform a task on his browser. However I feel that the construction of the sentence is wrong: "Could you select the URL , by clicking on the address bar and scroll to ...
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1answer
18 views

Is this a phrase?

"Any tender of documents or money hereunder may be made upon Vendor or Purchaser." I never see such a phrase" be made upon", I tried to search it online without any useful ...
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1answer
28 views

What does the phrase “hop across an icy chasm” mean here?

I came across the phrase "hop across an icy chasm" in the following sentence from the description (not available online) of an app: All you need to do is to tap to hop across an icy chasm. ...
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1answer
19 views

What are the differences in the following sentences [closed]

I will go on on Monday too I will go on Monday as well Do they have same meaning ? If not what are the differences between them ?
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1answer
30 views

Asking for a Bus

I am having trouble with these Phrases... Is there a bus to the city? Is there a bus to town? "Is there a bus into town?" I'm not sure if they are correct because I would usually say... &...
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2answers
102 views

Expression “My Scrotum” [closed]

You know, for example, when you upload at a site a music you think good(not for the purpose of learning English but just for its own fun sake there is no such site at SE unfortunately, PLEASE ...
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1answer
44 views

Transcribing Burj Al Arab

Could you transcribe "Burj Al Arab" with English phonetic symbols? /bɜːdʒ ˈæl ˈær.əb/? Hotel Burj Al Arab is where the idea of a seven-star hotel came to life Source: SkyScanner
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2answers
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Plurals: “As matters of fact”, “As matter of facts”, and “As matters of facts” which one(s) when? if any?

I am wondering which one is correct or when/where one should use them: As matters of facts, A did X and B did Y. As matters of fact, A did X and B did Y. As matter of facts, A did X and B did Y. I ...
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1answer
23 views

I also did vs Me too

I thought it was hard at school. If my response on such phrase is: I also did. or Me too. Does it mean the same and it doesn't contain any difference? Which response is more popular in this ...
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1answer
20 views

“in like manner” vs. “in a like manner”

Can "in a like manner" and "in like manner" be used interchangeably, or do each of these phrases have a special meaning? (or perhaps one is incorrect)? I've seen both expressions ...
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1answer
35 views

Is the phrase “Whatever makes you happy” passive aggressive?

I want a more confident grasp of this phrase/sentence. Was playing a game. Text exchange between me (a man) and a woman. After some things said, me- I'm smarter than you. her- whatever makes you happy ...
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2answers
26 views

Is “it’s like men’s shirts” an idiomatic expression?

I came across the expression on a JapanToday webpage. Why it's hard to make vaccines and boost supplies "We think, well, OK, it’s like men’s shirts, right, I’ll just have another place to make ...
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1answer
16 views

The meaning of pass over in this sentence

I am having difficulty understanding the meaning of "passed over" in this sentence. and not sure who's doing the action of "passing over"? Can I get a little help please? thanks. &...
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2answers
31 views

Which phrase is more natural to and a conversation, “that's it” or “that's about it”?

When ending a conversation or discussion what is the best phrase? "That's it" or "that's about it"? Do they both mean the same thing?
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1answer
20 views

Prepositional Phrase vs Participle Phrase

Following the meeting, we all had a chat. In the above sentence, what is Following used as. Is it a adjective or preposition or both? Also,is following the meeting a prepositional phrase or participle ...
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27 views

“It had to be” vs. “it had to be” in the sense of being likely

In the 12th episode of the 9th episode of The Office Jim said the following. Jim: The Dunder Code! I completely forgot about that prank. That had to be like six or seven years ago. Stayed late every ...
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0answers
26 views

brink of error vs brink of mistake

How to fill the gap "Musician should teeter on the brink of ___ while playing." error mistake failure Is any of these alternatives more "idiomatic" for the expression? The ...
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9answers
7k views

Are you an English? Are you a British?

I once encountered a lady who seemed to come from America or the United Kingdom. When I asked Are you an American? she said no. I was reluctant to ask if she is an English because it sounded very ...
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1answer
18 views

Can i use “a short time frame” in this sentence “I once submitted a project report with a short time frame literally 1 minute before the deadline.”

Can I use "a short time frame" in this sentence to mean "there was not a lot of time for this project report"? Also, can i interchange with "a tight deadline"? I once ...
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0answers
24 views

Phrase usage: Dipping ones toe (into sth.)

You start to grow by first dipping your toe. Can this sentence be used as a motivational quote? If dipping your toe into sth. means testing it out, carefully approaching it and growth is considered ...
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1answer
38 views

What's the meaning of this sentence? (I'm confused by the sentence after the comma)

What's the meaning of this sentence ? (I'm confused by the sentence after the comma) To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom, in the pursuit of truth as in the endeavor after a worthy manner of ...
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1answer
23 views

What does “hold a desire to be good” mean?

In the article Autonomy | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, there is a sentence: An agent has a preference if he or she holds a certain first level desire to be good "First level desire"...
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1answer
22 views

Phrase to express something has had a great impact despite a negligible popularity?

Can you please suggest me an alternative phrase to the highlighted one that would express "when you take in account the very insignificant popular knowledge it receives"? The Effective ...
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1answer
24 views

What does “remind somebody instead of something” mean?

Below is the whole sentence that makes me confused. One respectably dressed middle-aged man carrying groceries asked Biletsky why he hadn’t deployed his regiment to deal with the crooks in parliament....
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1answer
21 views

“There is no something” vs “no something”

Is it correct in English to write: No water No apple No dog when there is no water/apple/dog? Is there any rule when only one form is valid: There is no water vs No water Let's say I create a ...
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3answers
623 views

Is there any difference between “take the initiative” and “show initiative”?

Could you tell me if there is any difference between take the initiative and show initiative? For example: Micheal is someone who takes the initiative. Micheal is someone who shows initiative.
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0answers
19 views

in love with the change vs in love with a change vs in love with change

Is it "in love with the change", "in love with a change", or maybe "in love with change"? For instance, I am pretty future-oriented person. Always in love with the ...
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0answers
27 views

Is it correct and natural to say “my finger tips are stinging with cold”?

Could you tell me if it is correct and natural to say "my hands are stinging with cold"? For example: I've been outside for too long and now my finger tips are stinging with cold. If doesn'...
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1answer
35 views

Is it correct and natural to say “what chance do you give to…”?

Could you tell me if it's correct and natural to say what chance do you give to... meaning what do you think is the chance of something happening? For example: Person A: What chance do you give to ...
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1answer
32 views

“the apps that have many options” or “apps that have many options”

Should I use "the" in before nouns that we want to add more descriptions about them using "that" after them? Like: I know "the apps that have many options" or "apps ...
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1answer
22 views

Does the usage of 'ever after' in this line sound weird?

I'm not so proficient in English, but I got this idea for a poem and am trying to write it in English. So I want to write a sentence like: "Nobody saw him ever after." But I'm not sure if ...
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1answer
217 views

What does on the ballot mean?

I know a ballot refers to a sheet of paper for secret voting, but what does the phrase 'on the ballot' mean in this example? When our very democracy was on the ballot in this election, with the very ...
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2answers
55 views

Is there an English phrase aligning with “甘为人梯” in Chinese?

In China, normal school students are taught to have the spirit of sacrificing themselves for the improvement of their students. Instead of concerning the threads(ladder-climbing) from who they are ...
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1answer
35 views

So it sounds, good for you

Mom: "I've already spent all my money on your bedroom. I'm broke." Boy: "Uh, you're broke. Poor Frankie. What, What did you break?" Mom: "No, I haven't broken anything. Broke ...
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4answers
478 views

Where would I place “at least” in the following sentence?

I have a question, where should I place my "at least" in the following sentence, lemme first show what's the meaning of my sentence: Maybe I won't get the gold medal, but I surely still ...
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1answer
25 views

“This sad memory of mine is something I value.”

Can I start my essay with this sentence below although the memory is not mentioned before? I'm worried because the sentence starts with the word "this." Is the phrase "this memory of ...
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1answer
36 views

Is it correct to say “I didn't study this chapter in details”?

My professor wants to ask me some questions about a chapter. I want to tell him I didn't study it in details. What should I say?
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1answer
33 views

Someone knows his/her business

Can Someone knows his/her business be interpreted as Somone knows his/her stuff? I want to say that someone is very knowledgeable or skilled in some area. I can't find such a phrase in a dictionary ...
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1answer
27 views

What is the missing verb and conjunction in “I'd sooner he never knock than knock now”?

Fire like fear, like panic, like one more minute of this and I'll die if he doesn't knock at my door, but I'd sooner he never knock than knock now. ("Call Me by Your Name") I am aware of ...
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2answers
81 views

Does “right upstairs” mean “on the floor directly above”?

Background This line from Monk: Mr. Monk Makes a Friend (2007) motivates this question. Adrian Monk says this just outside his home to a friend of his. Come on, I live right upstairs. Just from this,...
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1answer
31 views

Is it common nowadays to say “Zoom in” to mean something like having a chat on Zoom?

On PBS NewsHour, I heard the following conversation. (At around 13:40 of the video.) A: Where are you going to be and what are you going to be doing on Christmas? B: I'm going to spend it at a quiet ...
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1answer
17 views

Is it correct and natural to say “come on the time you do something” when you really want someone to do something?

Could you tell me if it is correct and natural to say come on the time you do something when you really want someone to do something? For example: Come on the time you come and we go on a trip ...
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1answer
103 views

What does “hit the tiz-own” mean?

I've come across it in the 14th episode of the 3rd season of The Office. Here is the context: Andy: Just listen, I forgot to tell you the plan for this Saturday. You, me, bars, beers, buzzed. Wings. ...
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1answer
96 views

What does “lay on the charm” mean?

I've come across the expression in the 8th episode of the 3rd season of The Office. Here it is: Andy: Am I trying to get under his skin? Y-y-yes, because the angrier he gets, the more marginalized ...
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2answers
31 views

“Be done with someone” VS “Be through with somebody”

I was wondering whether either one of the sentences below: a. I'm done with you. b. I'm through with you. can be used in AmE to imply: "our relationship is over" for the speaker. If no, ...
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1answer
30 views

preposition choice: “reckon with” or “reckon on” in British English

Does the choice of "on" or "with" make any difference in the following? I didn't think that there would be a traffic jam, and didn't plan extra time in the journey. I didn't ...

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