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Questions tagged [phrases]

A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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Welcome as short version of "you are welcome"

Is it possible to say welcome instead of you are welcome? What would be the short response to a thank you, especially in written communication?
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6 votes
1 answer
1k views

What do American people call the classes that students go to after school for SATs?

What do American people call the classes that students go to after school for SATs? In Taiwan, we call it a cram school, but there is no such phrase in any American dictionary. Could Americans please ...
Delfino's user avatar
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2 answers
24 views

Poetic construction - phrases placement

I am told by a friend that in English, words and phrases can be placed differently for added poetic expressions, rhythm and readability. #1 How different has turned the promises of the lady who [...]!...
Ammu's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
135 views

Out of love for something/someone

Is the phrase above a natural choice in these two sentences below. (Let's say on a bag of flour, you can read the the following) We made it (the flour) out of love for baking. They gave her a present ...
Idunno's user avatar
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-2 votes
1 answer
77 views

What are the original and derived senses of "sound off"?

Merriam Webster says: sound off intransitive verb : to play three chords before and after marching up and down a line of troops during a ceremonial parade or formal guard mount : to count cadence ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why is there no 'that' before 'meets' in 'more than meets the eye'?

Like, it seems to be more grammatical to say, There's more to his personality than that meets the eye. By the way, since we see it with both our eyes, why is 'eye' in its singular form in the ...
Michael's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
35 views

Why is a Hyphen Used in 'Mid-May' but Not in 'Early October'?

I'm trying to understand the rules for hyphenation in compound time expressions. Specifically, I noticed that "mid-May" is commonly hyphenated, while "early October" is not. Mid-...
wxystudio's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
125 views

Should the phrase 'beat that time' be replaced by 'surpassed the record'?

In an article on sporting achievements, the author has compared the performance of two sprinters, Jesse Owens and Usain Bolt [Ref : Burlington English (UK) lesson] : In 1936, Owens set an astonishing ...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
21 views

Emotionally and professionally unavailable

Is there a phrase to describe a person who is emotionally unavailable to commit?
John D's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
789 views

a phrase for describing "shaking hands"

Is there a phrase that describes a "handshake" when reaching an agreement? Where no paper was signed and the "handshake" represents the signing of the contract.
Gilad Kahana's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
103 views

Is it natural to say that houses are "closer/lower to the ground" (compared to apartments)?

Old people like living in houses, closer to the ground compared to apartments. I feel that this is a suitable phrase, but I googled it and didn't find many examples using it. So I'm wondering if it ...
Phoebe's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Meaning of English phrase "put oneself at someone else's head"

What is the meaning of the phrase "Kemal planned to put himself at their head"? Saw it in the book "A peace to end all peace". I am not a native English speaker. This phrase ...
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2 answers
51 views

How does "head over heels" mean upside down?

How does "head over heels" mean upside down? I can't find its etymology in https://www.etymonline.com/word/head%20over%20heels. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heels%20over%20head ...
Tim's user avatar
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-1 votes
3 answers
491 views

How do you answer when someone asks you to do something?

When someone asks you politely to do something and you want to do it, how do you answer? I was using "ok", but it seemed too general and thought about "of course". I want to know ...
konto's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
23 views

Meaning of "As can trying"

I found several sentences using this phrase, such as: Physical activity can help, as can trying to relax your body – if we are tense it often causes us to tense our shoulders, for example. Isolation ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
32 views

What does "pull out" mean in "Democrats pulling out all the stops against RFK Jr."?

The title of https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/4606148-rfk-jr-robert-f-kennedy-jr-nicole-shanahan-libertarian-democrats-joe-biden-donald-trump/ is: Democrats pulling out all the stops against RFK ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
86 views

Whats the difference between "need no" and "no need"?

I've studying English, and I ran into these 2 phrases example 1: The boy had no need for the love of his friends example 2: I need no protection! So I'm in doubt about this two ways of usage. My ...
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1 vote
1 answer
26 views

Confused about 'word of'

I came across a sentence today: Our client said this would be our last deal, seeing as word of our plan got out. What does the phrase 'word of' refer to? Is it equal to '..., seeing as the detail/...
kokomi's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
35 views

What is the meaning of "pass" in "in passing"?

"in passing" means briefly, by the way, incidentally, ... Is "pass" in it a verb? A intransitive verb? What is its meaning? I can't find one from https://www.merriam-webster.com/...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Every other something

I'm a bit confused with the usage of "every other something" I know that "every other" means each alternate in a series of things. However, the phrase "I interviewed 6 ...
Alex's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
66 views

News headline for "local police officer hit by male driver who's a university student on traffic stop"

I want to create a news title for the following sentence: A local police officer hit by a male driver who's a university student on traffic stop What I'm struggle at is how to properly shorten the ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
10 votes
4 answers
3k views

Seeking an English Equivalent for the Concept of "Evil Eye"

I'm trying to understand how to express a concept from my culture in English. In my language, we have a term, which roughly translates to casting the evil eye. This term is often used in situations ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
77 views

Phrases formed by pattern "preposition + adjective" such as: "In general", "In particular", "In short"

There are several structures formed by the pattern "In + Adj." such as: "In general", "In particular", "In short". Collins dictionary lists those three ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Is the phrase "alone work" legitimate?

For the purpose of a cover letter, would it be legitimate to use the phrase "alone work" to describe your past professional activities that were conducted individually? Is it grammatically ...
Sebiti's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
23 views

Is "put ~ at ease" compatible with "with"?

I can say "I'm at ease with something". And I think "put ~ at ease" consists of "put" and "at ease". Then, can I say "somebody put me at ease with ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
184 views

Meaning of "be on" and "break"?

In one episode of the "How I met your mother" series, Ted is talking about his possible future wife (Robin). Here's the script: Ted: I just met a perfect woman! She was like this:( He ...
Hadimsv's user avatar
  • 522
2 votes
2 answers
386 views

What is the difference between "the game is so fun" with "fun" as an adjective and "the game is so fun" with "fun" as a noun?

What is the difference between "the game is so fun" with "fun" as an adjective and "the game is so fun" with "fun" as a noun? I don't know if "fun" is ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
49 views

Is "help (to) do sth for sb" right?

I am a English learner. When I had English class, my teacher told me a phrase. help (to) do sth for sb I felt very confused about this phrase. Because there is a verb that has a verb phrase as an ...
Zhang's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
2 answers
344 views

Sheep heart? Mutton heart? etc

I had a student ask me about the following. I began to confuse myself to be honest. I know that we can use the phrase "beef heart." But what about when talk about sheep heart - do I ask my ...
Janice's user avatar
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1 answer
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phrase: after the restaurant

I have made up the sentences below. (1) This morning, I did some shopping at ABC Mall and had breakfast. After the restaurant, I walked to DEF Park to meet my friend. Is "after the restaurant&...
ansonman's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
126 views

correct phrase [two summers ago] vs [two years ago in the summer]

I have made up the sentences below. (1) Two summers ago, when I travelled to ABC, I met my long lost friend. (1) Two years ago in the summer, when I travelled to ABC, I met my long lost friend. Which ...
ansonman's user avatar
  • 629
2 votes
3 answers
222 views

What does 'orange software' in 'Bro got orange software' mean?

In this Reel titled Bro did him dirty, a (white) cat is concealed within a box by another, which closes the lid by sitting on it. The top comment, which had been upvoted by more than 600 people, of ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
112 views

"Nobody's here" vs "people aren't here"

"Nobody's here" vs "people aren't here" What's the difference? I think in the former, there are no people, but in the latter, there are people but they are not here.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
95 views

If I didn't have vs Hadn't I had. What's the difference?

I took an English test where I had to complete sentences. After I finished the test I was told that my answer "If I didn't have..." was wrong and I should have written "Hadn't I had...&...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
85 views

Verb omission in English. "Enemy down" without any linking verb

Why are there no linking verbs in the following examples? Enemy down Feet dry Feet wet Mission completed Shouldn't it be "the enemy is downed" or "the enemy has been downed"? &...
Petr Vatov's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
302 views

Is the post-modifier "to write" part of a noun phrase in "letters to write"?

I have letters to write. Is the post-modifier "to write" forming a noun phrase with the noun "letters"?
Salim uddin's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
42 views

I received a phone call from [closed]

I received a phone call from the school but the call got disconnected so I want call back to ask who call me, also I think the HR department but I don’t know how to make the sentence
Ibrahim Gerges's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
180 views

What does "Tell me about it" mean?

John: "I had a rough day." Mary: "Tell me about it." What does "Tell me about it" mean? Mary's statement doesn't sound sincere to me.
Shoes's user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
2 answers
29 views

"some chapters of it" vs "some of its chapters"

which one should i use and where? for example: in order to shorten the book we have omitted some of its chapters or in order to shorten the book we have omited some chapters of it?
Mahmoud Imani's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

identify the predicate and verb phrase

Identify the predicate and verb phrase - "Women should wear long sleeves and long dresses or trousers, so their body is covered."
Helen's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What does a comma mean when it separates noun phrases?

A comma separating adjectives is understood as AND. What does a comma mean when it separates noun phrases? Flow is a state of mind, a level of concentration in which outside stimuli seem to fall away....
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
127 views

What does "take by the heel" mean?

https://www.etymonline.com/word/Jacob#etymonline_v_1631 says: Jacob masc. proper name; Old Testament patriarch, son of Isaac and Rebecca and father of the founders of the twelve tribes, from Late ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 4,047
1 vote
1 answer
58 views

How to place 'not' reasonably in a clause?

Is it true that we often use 'not' with a verb or auxiliary verb i.e. 'not to do', 'do not need to do'? 'not' does not have this limitation when it forms a fixed collocation with other words, such as ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
58 views

Meaning of the phrase "strike a bonanza"

Just as a tribe might occasionally strike a bonanza in the game of primitive warfare, sometimes a state might do the same, given the opportunities offered an Alexander the Great or a Hernan Cortes. ...
Dmitry's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

How do you explain 'at the time'

Here I see this sentence: The revived nematodes were found in permafrost some 130 feet underground near the Kolyma river in eastern Russia. Researchers collected samples of the permafrost in the ...
Thomas Peng's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
104 views

What is the meaning of "what goes to" in this context

Screenplay Husband and wife are talking about their ill son: A: He can hardly eat anything and here we are, wasting our time with this shit. B: Oh yeah? Like you have any idea what goes to feed him. ...
Ivan Milošević's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
742 views

I know for myself or I know to myself

Which is best when describing what you already realize within yourself. To give context, I was self-reflecting during this time. I was going to say that: I know to/for myself that I was having some ...
Remi's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
2 answers
88 views

What does "for cause" mean?

https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/4218489-robert-menendez-broke-the-goldilocks-rule-of-corruption/ says The curious thing about Senate trials is that you have a jury composed of people you ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 4,047
4 votes
3 answers
786 views

Tone and meaning of phrases that start with "I thought I said"

I have heard this phrase often when people are irritated if not upset about what had happened despite them making it clearer that they don't wish for it. Eg: I thought I said NO. I thought I said no ...
Ammu's user avatar
  • 639
2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Grammatical Unit İdentifying Problem

Fearing the old woman would be frightened by their being alone, and not hoping that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions, he took hold of the door and drew it towards him ...
Cihan Şükrü Zorlu's user avatar

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