Questions tagged [phrases]

A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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Every other something

I'm a bit confused with the usage of "every other something" I know that "every other" means each alternate in a series of things. However, the phrase "I interviewed 6 ...
Alex's user avatar
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3 answers
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News headline for "local police officer hit by male driver who's a university student on traffic stop"

I want to create a news title for the following sentence: A local police officer hit by a male driver who's a university student on traffic stop What I'm struggle at is how to properly shorten the ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
10 votes
4 answers
3k views

Seeking an English Equivalent for the Concept of "Evil Eye"

I'm trying to understand how to express a concept from my culture in English. In my language, we have a term, which roughly translates to casting the evil eye. This term is often used in situations ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Phrases formed by pattern "preposition + adjective" such as: "In general", "In particular", "In short"

There are several structures formed by the pattern "In + Adj." such as: "In general", "In particular", "In short". Collins dictionary lists those three ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the phrase "alone work" legitimate?

For the purpose of a cover letter, would it be legitimate to use the phrase "alone work" to describe your past professional activities that were conducted individually? Is it grammatically ...
Sebiti's user avatar
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Is "put ~ at ease" compatible with "with"?

I can say "I'm at ease with something". And I think "put ~ at ease" consists of "put" and "at ease". Then, can I say "somebody put me at ease with ...
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2 votes
2 answers
183 views

Meaning of "be on" and "break"?

In one episode of the "How I met your mother" series, Ted is talking about his possible future wife (Robin). Here's the script: Ted: I just met a perfect woman! She was like this:( He ...
Hadimsv's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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What is the difference between "the game is so fun" with "fun" as an adjective and "the game is so fun" with "fun" as a noun?

What is the difference between "the game is so fun" with "fun" as an adjective and "the game is so fun" with "fun" as a noun? I don't know if "fun" is ...
Tom's user avatar
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Is "help (to) do sth for sb" right?

I am a English learner. When I had English class, my teacher told me a phrase. help (to) do sth for sb I felt very confused about this phrase. Because there is a verb that has a verb phrase as an ...
Zhang's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
287 views

Sheep heart? Mutton heart? etc

I had a student ask me about the following. I began to confuse myself to be honest. I know that we can use the phrase "beef heart." But what about when talk about sheep heart - do I ask my ...
Janice's user avatar
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phrase: after the restaurant

I have made up the sentences below. (1) This morning, I did some shopping at ABC Mall and had breakfast. After the restaurant, I walked to DEF Park to meet my friend. Is "after the restaurant&...
ansonman's user avatar
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correct phrase [two summers ago] vs [two years ago in the summer]

I have made up the sentences below. (1) Two summers ago, when I travelled to ABC, I met my long lost friend. (1) Two years ago in the summer, when I travelled to ABC, I met my long lost friend. Which ...
ansonman's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
180 views

What does 'orange software' in 'Bro got orange software' mean?

In this Reel titled Bro did him dirty, a (white) cat is concealed within a box by another, which closes the lid by sitting on it. The top comment, which had been upvoted by more than 600 people, of ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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3 answers
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"Nobody's here" vs "people aren't here"

"Nobody's here" vs "people aren't here" What's the difference? I think in the former, there are no people, but in the latter, there are people but they are not here.
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1 vote
1 answer
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If I didn't have vs Hadn't I had. What's the difference?

I took an English test where I had to complete sentences. After I finished the test I was told that my answer "If I didn't have..." was wrong and I should have written "Hadn't I had...&...
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Verb omission in English. "Enemy down" without any linking verb

Why are there no linking verbs in the following examples? Enemy down Feet dry Feet wet Mission completed Shouldn't it be "the enemy is downed" or "the enemy has been downed"? &...
Petr Vatov's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
301 views

Is the post-modifier "to write" part of a noun phrase in "letters to write"?

I have letters to write. Is the post-modifier "to write" forming a noun phrase with the noun "letters"?
Salim uddin's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
40 views

I received a phone call from [closed]

I received a phone call from the school but the call got disconnected so I want call back to ask who call me, also I think the HR department but I don’t know how to make the sentence
Ibrahim Gerges's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

What does "Tell me about it" mean?

John: "I had a rough day." Mary: "Tell me about it." What does "Tell me about it" mean? Mary's statement doesn't sound sincere to me.
Shoes's user avatar
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2 answers
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"some chapters of it" vs "some of its chapters"

which one should i use and where? for example: in order to shorten the book we have omitted some of its chapters or in order to shorten the book we have omited some chapters of it?
Mahmoud Imani's user avatar
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identify the predicate and verb phrase

Identify the predicate and verb phrase - "Women should wear long sleeves and long dresses or trousers, so their body is covered."
Helen's user avatar
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1 answer
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What does a comma mean when it separates noun phrases?

A comma separating adjectives is understood as AND. What does a comma mean when it separates noun phrases? Flow is a state of mind, a level of concentration in which outside stimuli seem to fall away....
South Indian ɪŋɡlɪʃɪfaɪd's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
66 views

What does "take by the heel" mean?

https://www.etymonline.com/word/Jacob#etymonline_v_1631 says: Jacob masc. proper name; Old Testament patriarch, son of Isaac and Rebecca and father of the founders of the twelve tribes, from Late ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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How to place 'not' reasonably in a clause?

Is it true that we often use 'not' with a verb or auxiliary verb i.e. 'not to do', 'do not need to do'? 'not' does not have this limitation when it forms a fixed collocation with other words, such as ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
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1 answer
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Meaning of the phrase "strike a bonanza"

Just as a tribe might occasionally strike a bonanza in the game of primitive warfare, sometimes a state might do the same, given the opportunities offered an Alexander the Great or a Hernan Cortes. ...
Dmitry's user avatar
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1 answer
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How do you explain 'at the time'

Here I see this sentence: The revived nematodes were found in permafrost some 130 feet underground near the Kolyma river in eastern Russia. Researchers collected samples of the permafrost in the ...
Thomas Peng's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
56 views

What is the meaning of "what goes to" in this context

Screenplay Husband and wife are talking about their ill son: A: He can hardly eat anything and here we are, wasting our time with this shit. B: Oh yeah? Like you have any idea what goes to feed him. ...
Ivan Milošević's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
341 views

I know for myself or I know to myself

Which is best when describing what you already realize within yourself. To give context, I was self-reflecting during this time. I was going to say that: I know to/for myself that I was having some ...
Remi's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
65 views

What does "for cause" mean?

https://thehill.com/opinion/criminal-justice/4218489-robert-menendez-broke-the-goldilocks-rule-of-corruption/ says The curious thing about Senate trials is that you have a jury composed of people you ...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
717 views

Tone and meaning of phrases that start with "I thought I said"

I have heard this phrase often when people are irritated if not upset about what had happened despite them making it clearer that they don't wish for it. Eg: I thought I said NO. I thought I said no ...
Ammu's user avatar
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Grammatical Unit İdentifying Problem

Fearing the old woman would be frightened by their being alone, and not hoping that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions, he took hold of the door and drew it towards him ...
Cihan Şükrü Zorlu's user avatar
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2 answers
79 views

Here lies - so telling lies here?

Sorry for my low level question, I am not native... I am thinking of a phrase "here lies Joe" which does not mean something like "Joe is telling lies here". I wonder why is it so ...
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5 votes
7 answers
4k views

Meaning of "How you get any work done is beyond me"

In one episode of the Friends series, the group is talking about the benefits of being a man and a woman. Here's the script: Rachel: Come on! You guys can pee standing up. Chandler: We can? All right,...
Hadimsv's user avatar
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1 answer
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"Fade-ins" (digital marketing)

What is the meaning of "fade-ins" in the following sentence found in a data protection agreement? "We use Ad Server Cookies to measure fade-ins of advertisements and clicks."
Ivan Milošević's user avatar
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1 answer
168 views

Is there a difference between ''when on'' and ''while on''?

Is it OK to say: When on holiday, I learnt how to swim. Is there a difference if we say: While on holiday, I learnt how to swim.
Adam Ahmed 's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
162 views

Does "particularly for the people having said child" need to be at the end of this sentence?

First, could you have a look at this quote, focusing on the highlighted portion? We looked for explanations as to why we felt so constantly wrung out — ranging from depression to mid-life crisis to ...
The OED Loves Me Not's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
234 views

Take the efforts or Make the efforts?

Is there any difference in the meaning of "Take the efforts" and "Make the efforts"? For example: "It takes efforts to quit smoking" or "Helping refugees to start ...
Daniel's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
39 views

What is the meaning of the phrase _____ killed my dog? [closed]

Yesterday, I was listening to a podcast and the host said something like _______ killed my dog. What is the meaning of that phrase?
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1 vote
3 answers
186 views

Does "subject to review" mean there is a possibility of review or that it is guaranteed?

Paypal said, "All transfers are subject to review and could be delayed or stopped if we identify an issue." I'm a native English speaker, but I don't know if "subject to review" ...
Jamin Grey's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Which does the phrase "consider doing something" imply, suggestion or suppression?

When someone says "Consider doing something", which is implied, suggestion or suppression? For example, "Consider eating more vegetables" sounds like a suggestion for me. But how ...
ynn's user avatar
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0 answers
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"But, also and interestingly" - Is this properly expressed in English?

But, also and interestingly, from an environmental science point of view: in addition, the study of planet atmospheres has not as yet found any evidence of gasses that are "out-of-chemical-...
NewPlanet's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
56 views

Why are articles sometimes NOT used before common nouns?

Take a sentence like: 'Excellent lady that she was, Lady Gigabytes invited us over for dinner.' Or: 'Lady Gigabytes (excellent lady that she was) invited us over for dinner.' What both these sentences ...
Bushra Iqbal's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
71 views

What is the difference between “looking at oneself” and “watching oneself on”?

Example sentences (a) He’s so obsessed with himself. He keeps looking at himself in the mirror. (b) He’s so obsessed with himself. He keeps watching himself on the mirror. As a native speaker of ...
Micheal Gignac's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
361 views

Confirm on vs confirm

Which phrase is grammatically correct? “Just wanted to confirm that” Vs “Just wanted to confirm on that” I’ve searched up both of them on google and they both seemed to be used so I’m guessing they’re ...
Maimai123's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is 'by the bye' an acceptable variant of 'by the by'?

This blog says, This phrase can be written in two ways: by the by and by the bye. Both spellings mean the same thing; by the by is the more common variant. Yet this blog says, Bye and bye, bye the ...
Michael's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Is using possesive s okay with conceptual things?

This is my original sentence "The visual aspects of DDS narrative ..." My professor says "The visual aspects of DDS's narrative ..." Which one is better? trying to avoid using ...
zEn feeLo's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
42 views

How to express that X was given every 2 days, and Y every other 2 days?

If, for example, X is given coffee on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and so forth, and tea on days 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and so forth, how can I express this as simple as possible (without mentioning even or uneven ...
Wandering_geek's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

What does the phrase "waiting for the proper gear" mean here?

Could anyone please tell me the meaning of the phrase "waiting for the proper gear" in the following sentence: Hidden beneath her casual demeanor lies a formidable fighter, waiting for the ...
curious's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
30 views

"What is the final will of Victor Porton?" - usage of the word "will"

"What is the final will of Victor Porton?", asked one of visitors of my (Victor Porton's) site from my AI chatbot. Should (supposed that the question was asked by a native speaker) the word &...
porton's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
232 views

Roll the dice vs. Take a chance

Both roll the dice and take a chance mean test your luck. Is there any difference between those expressions? As far as I am aware, both phrases suppose an action to be taken; I can't imagine any ...
HexenSage's user avatar

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