Questions tagged [phrases]

A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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6
votes
4answers
179k views

“So am I” or “So do I”?

What would be the correct way to reply to a statement such as: "I belong to this group" Would it be "So do I" or "So am I"?
0
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0answers
17 views

“such a lot of friends”

What's up with that phrase "such a lot of friends", "such a lot of money" etc First of all, I've never heard it before, not in 30 years. Second of all, why isn't it "so a lot of friends" (sounds ...
-1
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1answer
12 views

Is there any difference in meaning and usage between the phrase “on one's part” and “for one's part”?

Is there any difference in meaning and usage between the phrase on one's part and for one's part in the sense of something being done by someone or experienced? For example: There were a few ...
0
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1answer
27 views

the meaning of “but” in the sentence quoted

These are not like the typical U.S. trade associations, which provide important services, but often services that increase the success of efficiency of individual members at the margins. Here, ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Synonym for empty [closed]

What are the good synonyms for empty?
-1
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0answers
16 views

“Why is it good that…” vs. “what is good about…”

Could you tell me if there is any difference in meaning between the question why is it good that... and what is good about...? For example: My parents say that is good that I don't have a family ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

What does the phrase “whizzes by in a giddy blur” mean here?

Could you please help me understand the meaning of the phrase "whizzes by in a giddy blur" in the following text (not available online) from the description of the game "Retro Bowl": Controlling ...
0
votes
1answer
9 views

What does the phrase “feel native to” mean here?

Please help me figure out the meaning of the phrase "feel native to" in the following sentence (not available online) from the description of the game "KartRider Rush+": You will find that the ...
0
votes
2answers
490 views

What type of phrase is “Beyond a doubt” here?

Beyond a doubt this man is honest. "Beyond a doubt" seems to be a phrase here and I believe it's a noun phrase, but I'm told it's not. Its a adverb phrase how? What is it?
0
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1answer
12 views

Dead Tap/Pipes?

I know that the word 'dead' can be used to describe a dead phone line or dead power outlet, but can it be used to describe a non functioning tap or water pipes connected to it, if no water is passing ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

A good synonym for hiding someone's neck

When it's cold outside or when you are in shame, someone might hide their neck as if a tortoise retracting it to its shell, but what verb or expression can I use to describe to action. Ex: When ...
2
votes
1answer
19 views

Travel around something or Travel something?

According to the dictionaries, the verb travel can be used without a preposition: travel something: travel the world, travel huge distances, etc. Can it be used like that with a particular country/...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

What's the meaning of “in the 90s”

From NPR (describing how the honeybees keep warm): They (honeybees) actually kind of cluster together and form a bee ball around the queen and then vibrate their wings and that keeps the whole nest ...
0
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0answers
11 views

is “in order to” a prepositional phrase?

is "In order to" a prepositional sentence starter? I use IEW writing curriculum, which requires one in my reports, but my teacher(aka my mother; I'm homeschooled) isn't sure.
1
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3answers
45 views

On the contrary

The man wasn't very trustworthy. On the contrary, he had been caught stealing twice from his boss. The above sentence seems incorrect to me, as far as I know, the use of on the contrary is for ...
0
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3answers
10k views

Idioms in Imagine Dragons' “Thunder”: “Just a young gun with a quick fuse”

Imagine Dragons' "Thunder" starts with a confusing verse where the singer speaks the time he was: Just a young gun with a quick fuse I was uptight, wanna let loose The closest meaning I could ...
0
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1answer
86 views

Should [good at something] be understood as active or passive?

I just wrote a psychology quiz and there was a "good at" question that I did not answer correctly. I would like to ask the thread's help on this one. The question was: Is the following a behavior ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Natural expression for asking “How to”

It always confuses me what expression I should use to ask someone about how to do something. For example, when I don't know how to pronounce someone's name, I'd ask, "How do you pronounce your name",...
3
votes
1answer
28 views

Is “good for you” or “good on you” meant as sarcasm in English?

In Swedish, kids (at least a few decades ago, when I was a kid) sarcastically say: Kul för dig! This literally means: Fun for you! Or, more clearly: That's good... for you!! (But what's it ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Does it make sense to say “with the exam passed”?

I wonder if the sentence such makes sense? "I left the school with the exam (whatever this exam may be) passed" The part I am not sure about is the phrase "with the exam passed". I would like to ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Glanced over her shoulder around the restaurant

She glanced over her shoulder around the restaurant. Does the sentence make sense if she's sitting with her back to the rest of the restaurant? Is it possible to glance over your own shoulder around ...
5
votes
1answer
10k views

“I was away last week” versus “I was out of town last week”

Someone asked me whether I was at home or not last week. When I say as a response, "I was away last week", or "I was out of town last week". is there any difference in the meanings? I just want to ...
0
votes
0answers
8k views

“all the way (through)” and “to the end”

I haven't watched the movie all the way through. I haven't watched the movie all the way. I haven't watched the movie all the way to the end. I haven't watched the movie to the end. Do ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Is it correct to say you are really aside to be old?

I was watching a short film and one of the characters said: "You really are aside to be old, sweetheart", and I wonder when it's right to say that, and the meaning of it. Here's the video: Horror ...
2
votes
2answers
17 views

“give something to someone as I had been given”?

Say I received much love from the community as I grow up and now wish to give such love to younglings in the community. Is it correct/natural to say "I give love to them as I had been given"? What ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Is the phrase “I wish you a good mood” used by native English-speakers?

Strict search yields many hits but the authors all seem to be foreigners. Thanks.
1
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4answers
4k views

“My aunt is coming to tea tomorrow.” (idiom “to come to tea”?)

My mother has decided to make a cake today since my aunt is coming to tea tomorrow. Source: my English grammar book. Google gives little results involving the given expression "to come to tea". Is ...
4
votes
5answers
13k views

Phrases or words to describe the sound a scissors makes

What would be a description of the sound a scissors makes when its two blades come together? Some examples might be: "The clipping of fingernails." "The snip of the blades". Words or phrases work.
0
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1answer
544 views

Clauses with “like” and “than”

He runs just like his brother. He runs just like his brother does. He runs just like his brother runs. Which sentence is grammatically correct. Also, what about these three?: He runs ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Alternatives for “It's been long since we met”

Let's assume person A and B have been apart for decades and they finally meet now. Then A might say "It has been long since we met." and this is correct. But I'm wondering, as alternatives, if ...
1
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1answer
15 views

Which sentences are ok to use?

Which of the following makes sense to use : 1- I feel fatigue. 2- I feel fatigued. 3- I perceive fatigue in your voice. 4- I sense fatigue in your voice.
0
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1answer
23 views

“Thank you back” VS “Thank you as well” VS “Thank to you, also”

"Thank to you, too." "Thank to you, also." "Thanks to you, too." "Thanks to you, also." "Thank you, too." "Thank you, also." "Thank you as well." "Thank you to you too." "Thank you back." "I also ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

What does the phrase “dropped loot” mean here?

Please help me figure out the meaning of the phrase "dropped loot" in the following sentence from the description of the game "Teamfight Tactics": While your warriors automatically clash, you’ll ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

What does the phrase “when the way you get around” mean here?

Please help me understand the meaning of the phrase "when the way you get around" in the following text from the description of the game "Bomb Chicken": It can double as a barrier to keep enemies ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

What does the phrase “boot down” mean here?

Please help me understand the meaning of the phrase "boot down" in the following text from the description of the game "Bomb Chicken": It can double as a barrier to keep enemies away, too. But these ...
0
votes
2answers
120 views

Discerning Phrases

" . . . The Book of Disquiet, an astonishing work that, in George Steiner's words, . . . " In this, I think I may see an adjective phrase, then, what may you call this phrase, in grammar? " . . . ...
0
votes
2answers
6 views

What does “how is that!” mean in this context?

In the 1995 comedy musical movie "Cannibal! The Musical", there is a song called "That's All I'm Askin' For!". Part of the song goes like this: It ain't a lot to ask. I'm sure we'll get it fast. ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

Alternatives to “to build on an idea”?

I'm looking for an different way to express a sentence such as: I build on the fact that human beings are equal. The synonyms I found don't correspond with the meaning of starting from a concept, ...
-1
votes
1answer
608 views

What's the meaning of “It came right as”?

It came right as president Trump and the Japanese Prime minister were sitting down for dinner at the president's private resor Mar-aLago in Palm Beach, Florida. In this sentence, What's the meaning ...
1
vote
2answers
9k views

Care to elaborate?

I have faced a lot of times at a chat or some Q&A site a reply: Care to elaborate? As far as I understand, the poster is asking for more details or explanations. However, in this case, I'd ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

What does the phrase “sliding in and out of drifts” mean here?

Please help me understand the meaning of the phrase "sliding in and out of drifts" in the following sentence from the description of the game "KartRider Rush+" (not available online): You should give ...
2
votes
1answer
439 views

Using an infinitive in subordinate clause

The Infinitive phrase may be subject: For you to learn English is good subjective complement: My desire is for my family to be happy object: I consider it better for children to learn ...
13
votes
6answers
39k views

Why is “many a man” singular while “many men” plural?

Recently I came to know that there is a construction "Many a man" which is equivalent to "many men". But I also noticed that the former construction is considered as singular, e.g. Many a man has ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What does the phrase “arranging the coloured triangles of floating three-dimensional geometric figures” mean here?

Please help me understand the meaning of the phrase "coloured triangles of floating three-dimensional geometric figures" in the following sentence (not available online): In the game, your task ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

on foot Vs. on feet

I'm coming home on foot? is equal to I'm coming home on feet? I've heard non native speakers mainly say both. I'm not sure if "on feet" is correct or not.
10
votes
5answers
3k views

What does “not one of them“ mean?

Does "not one of them" mean “more than one of them” or “none of them”? Example: Not one of them thought it necessary to avoid dogmatic statements about unicorns because he had never seen one of ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What does the phrase “late game” mean here?

Please help me figure out the meaning of the following sentence from the description of the game "Star Wars: Galaxy of Heroes": Recent updates to the late game allow your Empire team to go to the ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

Can 'in depth' ever be a noun?

In the 'Introduction' to James Thurber's 'My Life and Hard Times,' I came across this sentence: 'He gained in depth and skill as he went along, of course.' I don't get how 'in depth' is used here. ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

What's the meaning of “all but unsuring runs by publicity-hungry outsiders” ? Thanks!

Here is the entire phrase : "As the 2020 race, the party deferred to measures of popular sentiment to determine who should make the cut for the debates, all but unsuring runs by publicity-hungry ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

What does “is accounted for” in this mean?

I partially get the idea of the sentence but I'd really want to know the actually meaning of this phrase here. Plus, for that last clause I don't really get its sentence structure as well. Lastly, ...

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