Questions tagged [postpositive-adjectives]

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1answer
52 views

To adverb or not to adverb? How about using a postpostive adjective?

I'm not sure what's up with this sentence, but I'm debating whether or not I should use an adverb here. 1) Not only do antipsychotics have debilitating side effects ranging from tardive dyskinesia,...
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1answer
268 views

provided chart vs chart provided

Which one is correct? The provided charts illustrate the information about employment. or The charts provided illustrate the information about employment.
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1answer
180 views

How to use “gold” as an adjective of colour [duplicate]

which one is correct or more natural: "the cake is purple and gold" or "the cake is purple and golden", and "a gold cake" or "a golden cake" still speaking of its colour? Thank you all.
4
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1answer
630 views

postpositive participles

My grammar book told me that when a participle functions as an adjective, normally it should be used before nouns. But I still saw some sentences like: The experience gained will be of great value to ...
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2answers
118 views

She IS a two-time Academy Award nominee vs He WAS the champion of 2015 competition

I was strolling on the Wikipedia page and saw phrases like She is a two-time Academy Award nominee. Source and He was the champion of 2015 competition. I would like to know which one is ...
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2answers
50 views

“the tangent line to a circle” vs. “the line tangent to a circle”

Consider: the tangent line to a circle the nearest house to the state-house a cheap compatible battery with my aging APC UPS Do the following examples have the same syntactic structure ...
3
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1answer
2k views

“reason given” vs “given reason”

Which is grammatically superior? The Hallows are a dangerous place, but if that is the reason given to abandon him, then she would forge ahead. The Hallows are a dangerous place, but if that ...
2
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1answer
52 views

the suggested exercises/ the exercises suggested

I´d like to know whether I could say these two sentences: However, I have calculated that in order to complete the exercises suggested, it would take closer to.... However, I have calculated ...
2
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1answer
112 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? “the birth a planet the size of Jupiter”

Consider: Scientists recently witnessed the birth a planet the size of Jupiter... You can find the original article here. I have two questions: I think it must be the birth "of" a planet, am I ...
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1answer
403 views

Postpositive adjective and plural form

Quoting this Wikipedia article: Another adjective with a special postpositive meaning is proper: in phrases like the town proper, Sweden proper, it means something like "strictly defined". My ...
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1answer
139 views

When should I add an adjective behind the noun?

When should I place an adjective after the noun it modifies? For example: "I can beat you with my eye closed" "I can spend the whole day undisturbed at the warehouse."
5
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1answer
1k views

When do we put adjectives before or after nouns?

My question is: when do we put adjectives before nouns, and when do we put adjective after nouns? Because sometimes, I heard people put adjectives before nouns and sometimes after.
2
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0answers
58 views

What is a construct like “data found” (vs “found data”) called? [duplicate]

I learned some time ago that in some cases the "characteristic" of an object, like "found" with respect to "data" is put after the object, i.e. if we found some data we should refer to them as "data ...
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3answers
206 views

Plausibility notwithstanding and Otherwise?

I looked up the dictionary but these two terms are very difficult to get. could any body clarify on me? Plausibility notwithstanding, rumors about unwitting folks engaged in otherwise low-risk ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between an adjective before the noun and after the noun?

For a long time I'm having trouble understanding the difference between two kind of expressions like those below in terms of meaning, not grammar: Excited people are looking forward to seeing ...
2
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2answers
668 views

“matters spiritual” vs “spiritual matters”

From A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens. France, less favoured on the whole as to matters spiritual than her sister of the shield and trident, rolled with exceeding smoothness down hill, ...
4
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1answer
156 views

past — a postpositive adjective?

Usage example with a context: Putin, like Hitler, lives in a mental time-warp that was outmoded already in 1914 — see his strangely 19th century views on diplomacy — and would be laughably obsolete ...
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2answers
209 views

One seldom upset

I'm currently reading Flowers in the Attic and found this sentence that has been bugging me for a while. My eyes widened. Such a vehement outburst from one seldom upset took me completely by ...
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3answers
2k views

proper — can this postpositive adjective be substituted for “in and of itself”?

Example: In computer programming, a directive pragma (from "pragmatic") is a language construct that specifies how a compiler (or assembler or interpreter) should process its input. Directives are ...
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2answers
608 views

Noun + anonymous examples

What phrases are for "noun + anonymous"? I've already found smokers anonymous alcoholics anonymous Are they always used for places where people go to quit using something, or have other meanings?
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3answers
217 views

“Delusions dispelled” What grammar construction is this? Is this an idiom?

I don't understand the grammar of this: "You will be dazed by the shock of delusions dispelled." (by George Johnson) I think it means, "He is dazed by the shock that naturally comes from your ...
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1answer
13k views

Can we use adjective after noun?

People angry with the high prices were protesting. Can we use adjective after noun without verb to be like the example above? Can you tell me what grammar rule is it?
5
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1answer
240 views

Why “the heir apparent to” instead of “the apparent heir to”?

Please consider this sentence: Einstein was propelled to international prominence as the world’s newfound scientific genius, the heir apparent to Isaac Newton. Why isn't it written this way (...