Questions tagged [postpositive-adjectives]

Postpositive adjectives are adjectives that follow the nouns they modify. In English, prepositive adjectives, or adjectives that precede the noun they modify, are much more common. Postpositive adjectives in English are often used in terms from other languages, especially legal or financial terms (accounts payable) or official positions (attorney general).

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Can we use adjective after noun?

People angry with the high prices were protesting. Can we use adjective after noun without verb to be like the example above? Can you tell me what grammar rule is it?
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What is the difference between an adjective before the noun and after the noun?

For a long time I'm having trouble understanding the difference between two kind of expressions like those below in terms of meaning, not grammar: Excited people are looking forward to seeing ...
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Why use an adjective after a noun?

I heard phrases like "place nice" and "place safe" several times during watching series and movies and each time I was wondering why an adjective stands after a noun while they ...
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proper -- can this postpositive adjective be substituted for "in and of itself"?

Example: In computer programming, a directive pragma (from "pragmatic") is a language construct that specifies how a compiler (or assembler or interpreter) should process its input. Directives are ...
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past -- a postpositive adjective?

Usage example with a context: Putin, like Hitler, lives in a mental time-warp that was outmoded already in 1914 — see his strangely 19th century views on diplomacy — and would be laughably obsolete ...
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postpositive participles

My grammar book told me that when a participle functions as an adjective, normally it should be used before nouns. But I still saw some sentences like: The experience gained will be of great value to ...
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"matters spiritual" vs "spiritual matters"

From A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens. France, less favoured on the whole as to matters spiritual than her sister of the shield and trident, rolled with exceeding smoothness down hill, ...
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