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Questions tagged [predicate]

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"At last, a women's magazine to explode the myth that thin equals beautiful." — Is it grammatical to build sentences without a predicator?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) At last, a women's magazine to explode the myth that thin equals beautiful. It seems to me (1) consists only of the adjunct "at last" and the subject (the ...
Loviii's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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What is the subject and predicate in the sentence "What time is the meeting?"

What is the subject and predicate in the sentence "What time is the meeting?" I think subject here is "the meeting" and predicate "what time is". Is that correct?
Pushparaj's user avatar
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identify the predicate and verb phrase

Identify the predicate and verb phrase - "Women should wear long sleeves and long dresses or trousers, so their body is covered."
Helen's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
1k views

"A myth come true." Is the base form of "come" legitimate?

source: When selected Cyclops, ready for your orders. I see it all. Awaiting orders. A myth come true. Always on standby. Yes, commander? (https://moapyr.fandom.com/wiki/Cyclops_Walker/Quotes) ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
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1 answer
89 views

Pro-predicate and Pro-predication

When I read CGEL, Quirk et al, I found some terminology very obscure. Now I need help. What do "pro-predicate" and "pro-predication" exactly mean and how can I distinguish between ...
user421993's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
526 views

Does "People should be concerned about…" contain the passive voice?

In a recent ESL test, the question was whether the following sentence contained the passive voice: People should be concerned about how to find alternatives to fossil fuels. The answer book says yes, ...
Vincent Loh's user avatar
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1 answer
73 views

Three questions on "In full glory reflected now shines in the stream"

2nd stanza of "The Star-Spangled Banner": On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
66 views

How to construct a principal clause?

How can I construct a perfect sentence? Both, principal and subordinate clause has a subject and a predicate. How can I be sure that the sentence I formed is a principal clause? For e.g. I am very ...
hassan hazrat's user avatar
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0 answers
28 views

Hemingway English

I have no issues with the book (A Farewell to Arms), it's so far generally easy to read, but sometimes I stumble across weird sentences like this one: Suddenly to care very much and to sleep to wake ...
Sergey Zolotarev's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
36 views

Which one is predicates?

I can think of several examples of where technical teams knew a proposed well would be dry and yet senior management wanted to drill it because of pressure from government or business partners. I ...
Limincao's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
162 views

What "How about" subject predicate object is?

As we all know, the sentence "How about walking in the park?" is perfectly viable. But where is the subject of this sentence? And how can we define its subject, predicate, and object?
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3 answers
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Is the type of subject complement a predicate nominative?

Is this subject complement a predicate nominative or predicate adjective? At the park is where she grabbed my attention. Note: At the park is a prepositional phrase that functions as a subject.
Maria Rodriguez's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
178 views

Imperative: how to distinguish independent clauses and a compound predicate?

Consider the following imperative-sentence structure Do 𝑋 and do 𝑌. (Source: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0067.html ) where I believe (but do not know this ...
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0 answers
76 views

Can you make a compound predicate with "but" or not?

I'm learning about commas, and some say you can't make compound predicate with "but". Others say you can. For example, the sentence: "We talked about not going to the meeting, but ...
callonnotme's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
95 views

It is faraway / far away (from X) to Y

It is faraway / far away (from X) to Y Here, to say how far it is from one place to another, should we use the adjective faraway or the adverb far away?
GJC's user avatar
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1 answer
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predicate identification

What are the subject and predicate of the following sentence? Is it grammatically correct? If not, how would you fix it? The Castle Fire ignited in August when dry brush sparked by a lightning storm ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
121 views

What's the subject in this sentence?

"Even tap water should be boiled before drinking." What's the subject and the predicate in this sentence?
equinox's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
651 views

Subject and Predicate in 'The cackling of geese saved Rome.'

In the question In the following sentence separate the subject and the predicate: The cackling of geese saved Rome. I think the sentence is talking about how Rome was saved due to cackling of geese ...
Sarthak Katiyar's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
64 views

How to interpret the meaning and find the predicate of a sentence from The Plague

An excerpt from The Plague A word that conjured up in the doctor's mind not only what science chose to put into it, but a whole series of fantastic possibilities utterly out of keeping with that gray ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
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0 answers
21 views

I can't grasp a marked part grammatically

This is the part of a conversation between 2 people. I am trying to figure out the sentence structure of B's last reply. A: I do that every day. That’s– [laughs] that’s really become– that’s really ...
bishop2's user avatar
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1 answer
132 views

Significance of the 'distinction' between 'subjects' and 'predicates'

I have always read that: the "subject" is the doer in the sentence and everything except the subject is the "predicate." But being a learner I have never been able to understand ...
user100323's user avatar
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1 answer
773 views

"Subject" and "predicate" in sentences starting with "there"?

A third grade student has been asked to find out the subject and the predicate in the sentence: There are a book and a pen on the table. Here, it says that the real subject is "a book and a ...
user100323's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
285 views

Is this grammatically correct "was and continues to be doing something"?

I'm confused by the construction "the team was and continues to be doing something". I'd simply say "the team has been doing something". But the sentence is meant to point out the persistence of ...
Word Crawler's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
339 views

Is comma discouraged in compound predicates even within long sentences?

I'm checking my new formal document with Grammarly, and feel uncomfortable seeing it suggesting I remove the comma in many compound predicates, even in longer ones. For example, the following sentence ...
iBug's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
230 views

Is The Simple Predicate (Verb) Sinking Or Colliding?

The sinking of the ship after it collided with an iceberg resulted in many safety reforms. What is the simple predicate? Is it Sinking? Or is it colliding?
John Upshaw's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
210 views

Does a pronoun (they) after "and" in a compound predicate sentence necessitate a comma before the "and"?

I have a genuine problem. A compound predicate has one subject and two or more verbs. This is the guideline I am following. Compound Predicate takes no comma when there are two verbs: Michael ...
AIQ's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
115 views

Should the comma in a compound predicate be omitted if the sentence starts with a quotation?

In the following sentence, should the comma be omitted? "Come in!" she said, and opened the door. My spell checker insists that this is "an unnecessary comma in a compound predicate", but removing ...
WabbitSeason's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
325 views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from a direct object?

What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? And how does this analysis apply to other verbs, like hurt for ...
Joe's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
203 views

Why is ''To Be'' verbs a thing even if the predicate is a verb?

I know that in English there can't be a sentence without a predicate. So we use these ''To Be'' verbs to make a valid sentence. But I wonder why we use them even if the predicate is a verb? What is ...
Abcd's user avatar
  • 107
2 votes
1 answer
133 views

If a clause/sentence doesn't have a verb/predicate, is it grammatical?

I heard a sentence from BBC: So, quite a few different meanings there to contend with, but I hope this helps you to identify which word you might use. In the first clause (before "but"), there's ...
Zhang Jian's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
5k views

Please help me identify the subject and predicate in this sentence [closed]

On the top of the hill lives a hermit. Please explain as well.
Shivam's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
4k views

Predicate and verb phrase identical?

Do the predicate and the Verb Phrase share the same name? The term verb phrase is used to describe the verb and all the subsequent elements of the sentence that it encompasses. The term predicate also ...
Caput Ind.'s user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
912 views

There's a lot (of biscuits). How can it be explained from the grammatical point of view? [duplicate]

While flicking through a textbook for beginners I came across the following: How many biscuits are there? - There's a lot! I wonder how "there is" can be explained to a student who knows that "...
Yulia's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Why are some possessive pronoun not categorized as possessive adjectives?

In a book(Wren and Martin updated Indian edition) I am reading it is said: The forms my, our, your, her, their are called Possessive Adjectives because they are used with nouns and do the work of ...
user31782's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
403 views

When gerund is subject

I have two sentence like following: Preparing the raw materials. Cleaning beaker,then putting them into box to reserve. This two sentence is similar,the gerund both is subject.But I am informed them ...
yode's user avatar
  • 119
2 votes
3 answers
6k views

"He is king" vs "He is a king."

I'm reading a book and encountering the phrase "insert name is king" a lot. I'm wondering, what's the difference between them? When and why should I use "He is king" instead of "He is a king"? ...
Alexey Nekrashevich's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
405 views

Relative clause as a subject predicate

Can which-clause function as a subject predicate like this? That is which we had to overcome and penetrate. It sounds weird to me, but is it a correct use of grammar?
gualk's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
891 views

Singular noun + linking verb + plural predicate nominative [duplicate]

Essentially, we have "[singular subject] was/were [plural object]." Which is correct? "What mattered was my determination and effort." "What mattered were my determination and effort." I ...
my_grammar_sucks's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Does the "Simple predicate" include parts of phrasal verbs?

A simple predicate is just the verb in the complete predicate. So are the adverbial particles of the verb part of the simple predicate? For example, "of" in "consist of" is it part of the ...
learner's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Questions about the sentence "All round him the long scar smashed into the jungle" from Lord of the Flies

I still have another question about the sentence "All round him the long scar smashed into the jungle was a bath of heat" from the novel "Lord of the flies". https://yadi.sk/i/uPxx0YAzuTL6s The ...
Li Xiaodong's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
618 views

Why is there no predicate in "we the people"?

I can't get the idea why. Haven't found anything on the internet
Earther's user avatar
  • 13
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

half yours and half hers

"I remember that you had sent me a photo with half yours and half hers photos." In a sentence like above, I know using collage will be a better option. But I would like to know if this construction ...
v kumar's user avatar
  • 1,008
1 vote
1 answer
37 views

Which is more common for everyday use?

An old man is sitting on the bench. Or There is an old man sitting on the bench.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
69 views

predicative use of "adverse"

Can we use the word "adverse" in predicative? The conditions on the moon are adverse for people to live In the sentence, is the use of "adverse" correct?
Thein Lwin's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
172 views

How Understand "A stage usually referred to as runtime"?

I know A stage is subject, but my question: What is the predicate? as or refer? What is the object? Maybe runtime? Edit: I paste whole sentence here: Code written using the .NET Framework is ...
Sayakiss's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Word(s) in a predicate, (object[?])? May you call it some phrase?

In this sentence: The dogs who run in the street are especially irritable in the late afternoon. is the verb are transitive? The dogs is a noun phrase, the subject, argument of are; who run in the ...
saySay's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
309 views

Discerning arguments of verbs, predicates?

I think I get that a verb may utilize arguments. Does a predicate announce something of an object (or subject)? In, "The lake froze solid". The lake seems a noun phrase that solid may predicate ...
saySay's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
353 views

What type of predicate is it?

I don’t want to go on knowing you. We have here a modal element (want),a phasal part (go on) and a gerund (knowing),so probably it is the modal aspective predicate, or I'm much mistaken? ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
3k views

How can an intransitive verb have 'objects' and 'complements'?

[Source:] The following description of predicates comes from The Longman Handbook for Writers and Readers (examples our own): With an intransitive verb, objects and complements are included in ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
332 views

Julian Assange walks out a free man

Julian Assange plans to walk out of Ecuador’s embassy a free man, avoiding arrest and extradition to Sweden to face questioning about sexual assault and rape allegations. (The Age) ‘A free man’ gives ...
Listenever's user avatar
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