Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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22 views

Should I use 'kinds' or 'types' here, and in which position?

We can see four kinds of sentences. We can see sentences of four kinds. We use different types of sentences. We use sentences of different types. Here, do 1&2 and 3&4 have same meaning or ...
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how to interpret a prepositional phrase

Thank you for your time. Please take look at the following: "The passage is primarily with summarizing the reasons for the rejection of an establish theory by the scientific community." ...
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Correct word order in prepositional phrases of the type to be + verb + preposition

which are correct word orders for prepositional phrases of the type to be + verb + preposition? E.g., which of the following examples containing the phrase to be aware of are correct? ...the fact,...
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Is “without” a preposition or an adverb in “Without thinking where I was going”? Lexical word or grammatical word?

I'm doing my English homework and I have this doubt so I would appreciate your help. I need to know whether "without" is a preposition or an adverb in this specific sentence in order to ...
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29 views

When MUST we use noun phrase + adjective , not adjective + noun?

I always catch my students using adj + noun even when it's not suitable but I don't know how to explain why we can't always do that and what the rule is. For example: Mental health issue people need ...
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“A look of disgust” vs “A face of disgust” vs “A disgusted face”

Do you think the phrases, a look of disgust, a face of disgust, and a disgusted face can be used interchangeably? For example, do you think these sentences can be used interchangeably? John looked at ...
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29 views

“Cultured in” vs “Cultured at” vs “Cultured about”

Do you think we can use the phrases, cultured in, cultured at, and cultured about interchangeably? I couldn't find any examples of, "cultured," with any of, "in," "at," ...
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Question on omission of “by” and location of modifiers

I am a nonnative graduate student writing science related journals. Whenever I write related papers, there are always confusing parts, so I put up a questionnaire to clarify this. What I'm confused ...
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29 views

How to use preposition “like” in a question?

Which one is correct: What was the weather like in Toronto?" or "What was the weather in Toronto like?"
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23 views

How to use Lit by and Lit with properly?

The room is lit by/with candles. The house is lit by/with electricity. What should be the appropriate preposition for each sentence?
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Is comma obligatory after a prepositional phrase starting with “Under”: “Under our beef brand, we produce marbled beef”

Under our Sverdlovsk Beef brand, we produce marbled beef from Aberdeen bulls brought to Russia from Scotland. Is comma obligatory after "brand", or could this prepositional phrase be left ...
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Is this a correct analysis of an adverbial prepositional phrase?

I am trying to analyse what I judge a compound sentence with an adverbial phrase (in italics) placed at the beginning: In what turned out to be a common experience for many people who tried to create ...
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Is “from simple to complex” grammatically correct

I often read the phrase "from simple to complex" and wonder if it is grammatically correct. The reason for the doubt is that "simple" and "complex" are adjectives and I ...
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Is it correct to say you are talking “to Skype”?

Let's say you receive a message from someone but cannot talk to them because you are on a Skype call. Which is the correct preposition to use for saying that you are busy using Skype? "Sorry, I ...
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23 views

What are the differences between “clean in between the fingers” and “clean between the fingers”?

I'm teaching my little children to wash their hands. Why do people say "clean in between your fingers"? Why not "clean between your fingers"?
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Which preposition for “I have no doubt {of/for/about} his ability”?

I had taken a quiz at school, and it was as follows: Which one is correct: I have no doubt _____ his ability. a. of b. for c. about I've chosen "of" but the correct answer was "for&...
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Prepositional Phrases used as Noun Phrases?

The country’s Supreme Court ruled last year that the ban was illegal, and gave the Knesset, or parliament, until March 1st to amend the law to allow gay couples to commission surrogacies domestically. ...
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Prepositional Phrase vs Participle Phrase

Following the meeting, we all had a chat. In the above sentence, what is Following used as. Is it a adjective or preposition or both? Also,is following the meeting a prepositional phrase or participle ...
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Is correct to say “You press it on to a pad of ink” or should “onto” be always the right choice?

I just came across this two sentences: You press it onto an pad of ink./You press it on to an ink pad. Collins Cobuild. COBUILD Advanced Learner’s Dictionary KINDLE-ONLY EDITION (Posición en ...
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42 views

“In the (near) future” or “for the (near) future”

I am wondering what is the difference between the following two sentences: The aforementioned signs point to a water shortage in the near future. The aforementioned signs point to a water shortage ...
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Is this correct “with my head faced up” “with my face faced up”

I don't know if this expression is correct. I looked up at the sky, with my face faced up. I looked up at the sky, with my head faced up. with my face faced up with my head faced up
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I had a kind of feeling this might happen. (what is object?)

I had a kind of feeling this might happen. a kind feeling [a kind]noun of [feeling this might happen]noun phrase I wonder which object is correct.
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What is set here? (noun or past participle)

Are you tired of taking pictures with your camera set to “Auto”? Do you want to create more professional-looking photos? You won’t want to miss this opportunity. "set" is used as a noun as ...
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23 views

Is it correct to say 'now onwards'?

When mentioning time period, is it correct to use the phrase "now onwards"? can we use 'onwards' after 'now'? or should we use only 'now on'?
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14 views

What does “which” refer to in the below sentence?

This is a feature of a computer which is new in the market. Does the above mean that the feature is new in the market or that the computer is new in the market or both the feature and the computer ...
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In the sentence “we always buy toilet paper in bulk”, does 'in bulk' function as an adverb or adjective?

Does in bulk modify buy as in we buy loads of toilet paper or does it elaborate on the number of toilet papers we buy? Is one way of seeing it less wrong than the other? Based on my intuition, I am ...
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17 views

what does “not for” mean in the beginning of a sentence? And a sentence sans a main verb?

Silks, satins and brocades, elegant plumes and gemstones—details like these give Lievens ample scope to show off his flashy handling of his medium. Not for him the fastidious, enamel-smooth surfaces ...
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25 views

“Independently of one another” VS “ in a state of independence of one another”?

Similarly, vocal learners may have developed the ability independently of one another. (From the ACT) What does the prepositional phrase "of one another" function as here? Modifying "...
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When the object and the preposition phrase are interchangeable?

This kind of sentence is really prevalent in a variety of articles. He is hewing out of the stone a piece of precious gold. In my original thought, It should be like He is hewing a piece of ...
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2answers
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Can a noun clause be part of an adverbial phrase?

For example: "He was punished for what he did to his brother."
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300 views

What part of speech is “up” in the following sentences?

I walked up to the ATM. I looked up at the sky. The way I see it, "up" is an adverb in both sentences. Meanwhile, "to the ATM" and "at the sky" are prepositional ...
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34 views

Does “up” act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
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“Use X for” vs. “Use X with”

Do not use any indentation styles other than K&R, Allman, and their mix, which uses K&R [for|with] control flow statements and Allman [for|with] function definitions. // K&R // ...
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75 views

In a longer time or For a longer time

If I want to express "To spend more time travelling to the workplace." Which phrases below can I use here? To travel in a longer time to the workplace. To travel for a longer time to the ...
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Because of or Due to?

The original sentence is from website A current-carrying wire in a magnetic field must therefore experience a force due to the field In this case, I think "due to" emphasises the noun &...
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24 views

Correctness of “Live by rumors”

Is the preposition used correctly or should there be another one? And is the phrase clear? I want to say that the person believes in rumors, not facts. Live by rumors.
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25 views

“Someone wiped his dirty hands on my towel.”

Recently, I came across the following sentence: Someone wiped his dirty hands on my towel. My questions: why using "on"? Why not to use "with"?
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“From the colonial period on”

Can I use a prepositional phrase such as "from the colonial period on" to lead a sentence? From the colonial period on the Haitian mulatto and black bourgeoisie have embraced the Catholic ...
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He prefers hot weather like… "in the south - Why are there two prepositions?

I just joined after a few years of coming to your boards for advice as I need help with a specific sentence. "He likes warm weather LIKE IN SPAIN / LIKE IN THE SOUTH" Is "Like" ...
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2answers
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What is the meaning of “burning on you”?

Context: In one of the news articles, there was a statement like this: "Mayor, the city is burning on you". The article discusses protests and arsons in the city. What exactly "burning ...
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55 views

Adjective or noun?

In the sentence "He became captain of the team", 'captain' (noun) is the subject complement of 'became' and 'of the team' (a PP) is the object complement of 'captain'. Since complements ...
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How to identify what a prepositional phrase is modifying?

He also forecast the usefulness of the medium for graphic artists in a letter. From that sentence, 'for graphic artists' modifies 'the usefulness of the medium' or ' the medium' ? And it seems that ...
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Can a relative pronoun give information about words in a prepositional phrase?

He was the most prominent of the French artists who welcomed photography as help-mate but recognized its limitations Does who (relative clause) give information about 'him' or 'French artists' ? ...
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For the 20 minutes cooking time

Leave the vegetables to steam over the rice for the 20 minutes cooking time https://www.collinsdictionary.com/es/diccionario/ingles-espanol/cooking-time Shouldn't the phrase be "for the 20 ...
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54 views

Is the phrase “in the weekend” really wrong? Or might there be some exceptions?

I have learned that "in the weekend" is a kind of weird expression, and that we should use "on the weekend" or "at the weekend" instead. I, however, noticed that the ...
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22 views

To follow a prepositional phrase with an imperative one

Except for Louisa, who’s away in Berlin this weekend, we’ll all be at the party. The first sentence is from Cambridge dictionary and hence I know it is correct. Fruits: Except for apples, eat them ...
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982 views

“I prefer riding to walking” VERSUS “I prefer to ride than to walk”

Original question: I prefer riding than/to walking I came across this exercise question in a book. The correct statement according to the book is: I prefer riding to walking Why is it to instead of ...
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just at the time that I dated my creation

The following sentence is from Frankenstein. Does the boldfaced prepositional phrase describe the time at which the speaker was seized with the nervous fever, or the time at which he remembered the ...
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47 views

none more so than for

Door entry systems place addition barriers for all those with communication difficulties none more so than for Laryngectomees. (You can find this sentence on the page below: https://publications....
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Do you use a definite article or zero article followed by a prepositional phrase

In the following two (similar) sentences the definite article is used in one, but not the other. 1 Capital letters are used for the names of people,places and languages. 2.Capital letters are used for ...

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