Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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Can "in favour of" be used in the context?

Will it make sense if I say, "Shopping will probably change in favour of delivery services". I would like to say that people will be opting for delivery services rather than go to shops. ...
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8 answers
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Are "on leaving school" and "after leaving school" the same?

I am working on IELTS Test Preparation. The original text writes: After leaving school, Moore hoped to become a sculptor, but instead he complied with his father’s wish that he train as a ...
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"pass the virus to somebody" vs "pass the virus on to somebody"

Can we use the phrases "pass a virus to someone" and "pass a virus on to someone" interchangeably? I am guessing the second example I gave below fine but how about the first one? I ...
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“on a day” vs “in a day”

Which one of these sentences is correct, or is either of them correct? I eat three tablespoons of molasses at most on a day. I eat three tablespoons of molasses at most in a day. Context: On a ...
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3 votes
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“Which pencil of mine”

Is this sentence correct? Which pencil of mine did you take? or is it grammatically wrong and I should say, “Which of my pencils did you take” which I am sure is grammatically correct? “Which pencil ...
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When you have a prepositional phrase outside the clause, what is it modifying/ functioning? And why? [closed]

An Ultra entity bonds with a would-be boxer to form a hero who protects Earth from monsters, along with the help of special defense force ZAT. Tiga was once one of the Ultra-Ancient Giants of Light ...
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From the opponent team?

Can we write - "I won the match by 54 runs from the opponent team". The first half of the sentence is correct, I'm confused about "from the opponent team".
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Is 'next to the right/left of' the same as 'to the right/left of'?

Lin sits next to the right of Bea. 'next to' here indicates how many positions to the right of Bea?
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What kind of "a" movie do you like?

If I want to merely ask someone what kind of movie he/she likes. Can I say, “What kind of a movie do you like?” instead of “What kind of movie do you like?” I know we can use “kind of a” in a ...
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"grateful to God" or "grateful for God"

I am listening to English dialogues for learning purpose. I came across the following phrase in this video. At 10:45, he says, "I am really grateful for God". But most of the time, I have ...
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What was from the jungle in "jack ate apple on the table from the jungle", the apple or the table?

Jack ate apple on the table from the jungle. Does the sentence mean that apple was from the jungle or the table was from the jungle?
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Puctuation - comma before a prepositional phrase

They are soldiers who come to the battlefield armed with their respective murderous weapons. In a document about "Prepositional phrases and commas" it is said that we are supposed to add a ...
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“The town is (located) 20km southeast of city X” [closed]

The town is (located) 20 km southeast of city X Is southeast an adjective being modified by of city X (an adverb phrase) and having 20 km (an adverb) modifying it? Or is 20km an adjective modifying ...
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1 answer
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Using "on " as a preposition instead of "from"

I read the below text in a book in which the author used the preposition "on" in a new way to mean "from." she was brutally raped by a physician on the staff of the hospital. I am ...
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2 answers
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Can the phrase "out of" be used to specify part of the whole?

Only one out of twenty students in my class passed the test. I think the usage "out of" in the sentence above I created is correct, but I am unsure if the following usage is correct: This ...
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What's the difference between "Would you like to go on a long drive with me?" and "Would you like to go with me on a long drive?"

Would you like to go on a long drive with me? Would you like to go with me on a long drive? The position of "with me" is different in both of the above interrogative sentences. As per my ...
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1 answer
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Tidal current is setting in the direction of Northeast

I use marine English at work. Which one is correct? Tidal current is setting to the direction of Northeast. Tidal current is setting in the direction of Northeast.
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Maintaining the participial form of a phrase

I am looking at the following sentence: Aided by a strong magnetic field, the machine is expected to capture particles of higher momentum. I learnt from here that the participial phrase implies a ...
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"in the morning" vs "on cold mornings"

I always know is "in the morning" until I read this article "should I let my vehicle warm up on cold mornings?" Why did it use "on cold mornings" instead of "in cold ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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"In which" vs "of which" in a sentence refereing to activities

Is using "of which" in the following sentence correct? can anyone tell me why it is correct and can we use "in which" instead of "of which"? I have taken the statistic ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Participle or Gerund when prepositions are present? [duplicate]

a) After having the meal, she went shopping. b) On being told the party was cancelled, the girl burst into tears. c) While walking along the street, Sandy answered. Please, advise whether the ing-...
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2 votes
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“They are mostly female.”

There are people. Eight of them are female, and two of them are male. I saw the dictionary express it as they are mostly female. But I want to use any prepositional phrase instead of “mostly.” In this ...
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What is the type of the phrase "to success"

The textbook says that To success is an adjective phrase but it seems like an infinitive to me. I'm confused whether it is a noun or an infinitive?
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11 votes
4 answers
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“Let for each 𝑗” vs. “For each 𝑗 let”

I wrote Let for each 𝑗 < 𝑛 a permutation ℎ𝑗 : 𝐿 ↪ 𝐿 be given. A proofreader (whom I can no longer ask) changed it to For each 𝑗 < 𝑛, let a permutation ℎ𝑗 : 𝐿 ↪ 𝐿 be given. This ...
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using plural in prepositional phrase

what is the best way to use the plural in the below setance? studies were grouped according to the types and components of interventions or studies were grouped according to the type and components of ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Prepostion at vs in, which is correct, "I am at my house" or "I am in my house"?

Prepostion "at" vs "in", which is correct, "I am at my house" or "I am in my house"? I tend to use "I am at my house" if for example I am calling a ...
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What is the syntactic function of 'more' in this sentence?

With more than $3 billion in box-office revenue, these fan-favorites rank among the highest-grossing films of all time. In the highlighted text, how do we parse this? Thinking about it, I can only ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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There are only a few days left for the exam(s)

There are only a few days left for the exam(s). There are only a few days left for the exam(s) to start. There are only a few days left until the exam(s). There are only a few days left before the ...
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Can a 'before' clause function as a noun complement?

It was a time before I knew you. In this sentence, the subordinate clause 'before I knew you' acts as an adjectival noun complement to 'time'. 'Before' is not a relative adverb that I am aware of, so ...
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Do you say "On the air" or "on air"?

Which is more common, "on the air" or "on air" The TV show was on air many years ago. The TV show was on the air many years ago.
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prepositions "on" and "about" a subject. Any difference at all? Or there is a slight difference between them

I am explaining my question with an example. From what I learnt, a book about spy is a book, probably a novel, in which one or numerous spies take major roles in the storytelling. Tom Clancy's books ...
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What does this 'as' prepositional phrase modify?

He learns about his responsibility as heir to the throne. In the sentence above, the 'as' prepositional phrase follows the noun 'responsibility'. Initially, I thought that it might complement said ...
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1 answer
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"On a course" vs "In a course" in American English

In American English, what is the exact difference between a student/teacher being on or in a course and what is the difference between a class/exam/subject etc. being on or in a course? Example ...
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What is the difference between at the cafe, in the cafe, and by the cafe? [closed]

so I'm learing Norwegian now at Duolingo. My native languange is not English. So I confused about a sentence that means "We wait by the cafe." Why is it 'by the cafe', not 'in the cafe' or '...
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1 vote
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"The Lakers have been winning in a row"

I wonder if we can say, "in a row" without specifying how many times in a row. For example, do you think sentences like the ones below can be said by native speakers? The Lakers have been ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Can prepositional phrase have verbs and subjects in it?

“I need information on how I can help.” I have read that prepositional phrases either lack a verb or a subject. This sentence seems to have both. Would this be correct and if so is the object of ...
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Ponder over/about/on [duplicate]

He seemed to be pondering his answer. My research: I think it means "he was thinking about the thing he was going to answer as in he knew the answer but again remembering it in an emotional way. ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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taste or smell like (that of) a lemon

Sour things have a sharp, sometimes unpleasant, taste or smell like a lemon. Sour things have a sharp, sometimes unpleasant, taste or smell like that of a lemon. ("that"= the taste or smell)...
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2 answers
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Is the prepositional phrase 'as a child' functioning as an adverb or adjective?

He was inducted as a child. In this example, what does the prepositional phrase 'as a child' modify? One would think that it describes the pronoun 'he', but if this is the case, shouldn't it be ...
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Can modifying phrases (adjectival and adverbial) be stacked/chained?

He walked on the road with pace. In the example above, there are two prepositional phrases: 'on the road' and 'with pace.' These both function adverbially, modifying 'walked.' Is this grammatically ...
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3 answers
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A question about a phrase

In a dictionary, I happen to stumble upon a phrase: bacteria magnified to 1000 times their actual size I think “than” was omitted from the phrase, but I'm not sure. I want to know the structure of ...
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How do you indicate the "length" of instalments?

I'm wondering whether it's correct to use the construction "instalments of + TIME" with the word instalment to express the 'length' of the instalment? For instance, can I say Payment may be ...
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Is this prepositional phrase adjective or adverb?

Is this prepositional phrase "with same sex quickstep" an adjective describing "history" or adverb modifying "makes in the sentence below? Andrew Makes ‘Dancing With The ...
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In the provided example, what does the prepositional phrase modify?

The film put the spotlight solely on the eponymous character. In this example, is the prepositional phrase (in bold) modifying 'put' like an adverb, or is it acting as an adjectival object complement ...
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What part of speech is this prepositional phrase?

What part of speech does "into a gourmet meal" function as in this sentence: "Watch this iron chef turn instant noodles into a gourmet meal"
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subject complement or adverb phrase

I have a question about a sentence below. we expect about 50% of registered voters to vote in the election. Is a PP(in the election) a subject complement(is it possible?) or a modifier? If it is a ...
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In noun complement

while studying a complement, I have a question in a sentence. The name was changed to avoid confusion with another firm. Is the preposition phrase(with another firm) a noun complement of the word '...
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2 answers
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A phrase function : adverb phrase or adjective phrase

In a text book, there is a sentence which I can't analyze. She's very conventional in her views. Is a preposition phrase(in her views) an adverb phrase or an adjective phrase? , Or does it function ...
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Is the prepositional phrase an adjective or adverb?

In the sentence, "Justice Department to announce lawsuit against Texas over law that bans nearly all abortions" are the prepositional phrases "against Texas" and "over law&...
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What is the meaning of "at one end"?

I read about negative inversion grammar and I am faced with this sentence below which I don't know the meaning of "at on end": No sooner had the paint dried at one end than it needed ...
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