Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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24 views

Police searched the house [preposition/ prepositional phrase] the murder case. Fill the blank

If police carry out some investigative activities (for example, interrogation) as part of an investigation of some particular case, how can denote the connection between the former and the latter (...
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Prepositions used with 'common'

Is the sentence, "There is nothing common between you and me." wrong grammatically? If yes, why? Should it be, "There is nothing in common between you and me."?
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“In / with the same amount of time” in this context

I give tuition classes to three children in the evening. My friend yesterday told me that I can include few more children in the same batch. and I can make more money with / in the same amount of ...
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recommend to someone or recommend someone [duplicate]

I want to know which is correct I will definitely recommend my friends and relatives to book your hotel for special occasions. I will definitely recommend to my friends and relatives to book ...
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Is it possible to use a bare infinitive for the object of an “of”?

For example, "I described the scene of him drive away."
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Prepositional Phrases as Subjects - Subject-verb agreement

http://www.softschools.com/examples/grammar/functioning_as_a_noun_examples/97/ From this page above, I found some examples showing prepositional phrases as subjects, but the predicate nouns are all ...
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42 views

“Use 37 minutes” or “Use at 37 minutes”?

I am doing my homework and I have to write how to cook a curry, I want it to be grammatically correct. Which one of these is correct? Use the spices 37 minutes before the curry is ready or Use ...
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32 views

Constituency tests — is a phrase like this a constituent?

When we have a sentence with a strange syntactic position, how do we know if a phrase is a constituent? For example, "The two shortest of the books" Is [of the books] a constituent? I tried ...
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On separating two prepositional phrases with a comma followed by and

Is it grammatical to separate the two prepositional phrases (P.P) by a comma in The truth is that after hospitals are hit, and in areas like this where there is just one hospital, our houses have ...
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How to choose between prepositions “of” and “from”?

In a class context, and talking about the homework that is due for today, is it better for a student to say: "For today, we had to learn parts 1 and 2 OF the lesson", or "parts 1 and 2 FROM the lesson"...
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“I learn a lot talking to you” vs. “I learn a lot by talking to you” [duplicate]

I've heard both of the sentences: I learn a lot talking to you. I learn a lot by talking to you. Does the first one means I learn a lot while I talk to someone and the second I learn a lot as ...
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In “With money in his pocket, he set off”, what is “in his pocket” modify?

By comparing these two sentences: He has money in his pocket. With money in his pocket, he set off. It seems that "in his pocket" is modifying "with" in the sentence. Is it true? If so, it means the ...
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Sentence starting with a prepositional phrase

This is from a TOEFL practice book: Of all the lawsuits in the world, _____ in US courts. A. Filed 95 percent of them B. 95 percent of them are filed C. That filed are 95 percent of them D. Which ...
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I am with them in Paris/ I am in Paris with them

Is there any difference between I am with them in Paris and I am in Paris with them.
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With or without a preposition?

Certainly, it is not as easy to learn to read and spell English as it is most other phonetic languages. from Uncovering the Logic of English: A Common-Sense Approach to Reading, Spelling, and ...
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use of preposition after verb prefer 'over' vs 'to'

Look at the examples below and please tell if both the uses are correct or there is any distinction in the meaning. I prefer tea to coffee. I prefer tea over coffee. Now if they are both ...
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I have heard about “in/on the news”. What about “at the news”?

I know that we commonly use “on the news” or “in the news”. However, I came across a sentence which is: They were overcome by a wave of horror at the news. As far as I can understand is ...
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77 views

In the entrance VS. at the entrance

Is there any difference in meaning between these two prepositional phrases? I am standing at the entrance I am standing in the entrance
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Is it okay to omit “by”?

It was first spotted in February by TESS, which methodically scans the skies looking for dips in a star’s light that might indicate that a planet is passing, or transiting, in front of it. ...
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in doing/by doing/while doing

By/in doing X, Y happens. I am trying to understand the subtle difference between "by doing X" and "in doing X" . This thread's responder says that: " Both "by doing X" and "in doing X" form non-...
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Is over here/ over there preposition?

I wonder if my knowledge is right regarding the following phrases being prepositions: i) over here ii) over there Both having the same construction= over (preposition) + here/there (adverb) ...
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28 views

Laziness is a problem with many students

I don't think the following sentence is grammatically correct: Laziness is a problem with many students. Wouldn't it better to say: Laziness is a problem for many students. or perhaps, ...
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Which is correct, to my knowledge. or for my knowledge.?

I was studying prepositions and stumble upon these phrases: First to my knowledge. for my knowledge. Second Go for a ride Go to a ride Third He went to England to a Sales Conference. He went to ...
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Which is correct, go for a walk or go to a walk?

I was studying prepositions and stumble upon this phrase "(1) go for a walk (2) go to a walk" which one from these two is correct and why?
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“Noun1+Preposition+Noun2” VS. “Noun2+Noun1”

If i want to write sentences such as the following ones, 1 Some people value the beliefs in respect. 2)The president gave him an approval to the policy. 3) there is a demand for water in some poor ...
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What is the difference of 'sat on' and 'sat in'?

According to ngram "he sat in" has slightly more frequency than "he sat on", but both are used, so they must be grammatically correct. Could they be used interchangeably without different meaning? ...
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to infinitive vs happen + to infinitive difference

Is there any difference between the following sentences, respectively? “It so happens that today is my birthday.” -- Today is my birthday. “I happen to have exactly what you need.” -- I have ...
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Which one is correct 'pour out' or 'pour'?

He poured out more drink. I found this passage on the internet. Since the usage of preposition still a mystery to me, I want to ask if I remove 'out' from this sentence, is it grammatically correct? ...
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50 views

prepositions + somebody/something + being or - + done

I just don't understand when to use "being" in those situations? What is the logic being them? 1- An earlier draft of the law proposed in August 2011 sparked widespread criticism for allowing ...
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Can I use the expression “Back at” to refer to some event that took place some time ago?

Back at our summer convention all the girls were using blue dresses. Back at our graduation party all the boys got together to sang her favorite song and most of them ended up crying like ...
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Correct prepositions for “named”

What're the common prepositions which can be used after "named"? For example: The rocky island named {by, for, from, after} its large pelican colony. In this sentence which preposition is correct ...
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“For + him/her/them + was + to+infinitive” vs “ was + for him/her/them to + infinitive”

The following sentence is from a book. [1] Her dying wish was for him to hike the Ap. trail. Why didn't the author write it as: Her dying wish for him was to hike the Ap. trail. Is there any ...
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Without Peter showing me what to do

Why is the preposition "without" followed by "Peter telling me what to do"? Does the construction have the same structure as "Without air, all animals will die"? Is "Peter (who is) telling me what to ...
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Selecting vs selecting for

See in this sense refers to selecting for variants that do reproductively useful things. What does for function here in this sentence. As far as i am concerned, we can use for when the word “...
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Is it correct to say “lend to me sth”?

Dictionaries usually recognize the following: lend me some money lend some money to me So how about placing "to me" immediately after the verb?
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Grammatical function of “for you” in this sentence

The best thing would be for you to tell her. Could you please help me identify the grammatical function of "for you"?
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Prepositional phrase attachment

Category killers and niche retailers compete effectively with department stores, which typically have slower inventory turns, high operating expenses, and larger inventory losses, but are experiencing ...
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126 views

Although they said nothing, she could sense their disapproval of her suggestion

why is the preposition of disapproval in the sentence "Although they said nothing, she could sense their disapproval of her suggestion." is of? Not for instead? Also for the verb disapprove, the ...
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40 views

Comma with preposition phrases

The man, from the country, is just one of my close friends. The man from the country is just one of my close friends. I'm curious to know whether there are any subtle differences in meaning or ...
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35 views

Prepositional phrase modify

Habituation is the decline in response to a specific stimulus over time, when that stimulus is repeatedly presented to the organism. The prepositional phrase in response is adjective and modifies the ...
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89 views

Meaning of “Around In”

Can somebody explain what does the author mean by using two prepositions after travel? With the construction of new subway and bus lines, Beijing became a much more comfortable place to travel ...
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330 views

Preposition after “price”

I have heard about: What's the price of the book. What's the price for the book. Today I have seen a sentence: We aim to bring down prices on all our computers. What are the uses of "on" ...
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Coming IN \ FROM the opposite direction

Macmillan dictionary says: The car smashed into a lorry coming in the opposite direction. If I use: .... coming from the opposite direction. Is there any difference?
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relative clause including prepositional phrase

You don't want to throw out all that equity you have with your current audience. I think a relative pronoun which or that is understood to be between "equity" and "you" , but was omitted to make it ...
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713 views

“In a week” or “a week”

A book says: There are sixty minutes in an hour. There are twelve months in a year. There are seven days a week. Where is the "in" in the third example, is "a year" an adverb here? ...
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are prepositional phrases ambiguous

We talked about the boy with a gun from the countryside. PP Phrases add information to nouns or verbs, but if there is more than one noun in a clause, Does it cause ambiguity? Like the example ...
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Can a relativizer be modified by PP phrase

The level of responsibility which the client carries for the whole development process with time & materials is much higher than with fixed-price or milestone projects. It can be understood that ...
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273 views

“I took five days off FROM work” vs. “I took five days off OF work” [closed]

I took five days off from work last year. I took five days off of work last year. Which is more appropriate? Thank you.
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369 views

Is this a correct sentence, “All over the world, English is spoken?”

1. English is spoken all over the world 2. All over the world, English is spoken Are they both correct sentences? Is there any difference in meaning?
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Would you tell me if “in the driveway” functions as adjectives in the sentence “The car is in the driveway”?

From The McGraw-Hill Handbook of English grammar and usage, 320p Adjective prepositional phrases are prepositional phrases functioning as adjectives to modify nouns. For example, in the ...