Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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2answers
20 views

Can a noun clause be part of an adverbial phrase?

For example: "He was punished for what he did to his brother."
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What part of speech is “up” in the following sentences?

I walked up to the ATM. I looked up at the sky. The way I see it, "up" is an adverb in both sentences. Meanwhile, "to the ATM" and "at the sky" are prepositional ...
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32 views

Does “up” act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
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1answer
29 views

“Use X for” vs. “Use X with”

Do not use any indentation styles other than K&R, Allman, and their mix, which uses K&R [for|with] control flow statements and Allman [for|with] function definitions. // K&R // ...
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1answer
17 views

In a longer time or For a longer time

If I want to express "To spend more time travelling to the workplace." Which phrases below can I use here? To travel in a longer time to the workplace. To travel for a longer time to the ...
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13 views

Because of or Due to?

The original sentence is from website A current-carrying wire in a magnetic field must therefore experience a force due to the field In this case, I think "due to" emphasises the noun &...
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1answer
23 views

Correctness of “Live by rumors”

Is the preposition used correctly or should there be another one? And is the phrase clear? I want to say that the person believes in rumors, not facts. Live by rumors.
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2answers
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“Someone wiped his dirty hands on my towel.”

Recently, I came across the following sentence: Someone wiped his dirty hands on my towel. My questions: why using "on"? Why not to use "with"?
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1answer
20 views

“From the colonial period on”

Can I use a prepositional phrase such as "from the colonial period on" to lead a sentence? From the colonial period on the Haitian mulatto and black bourgeoisie have embraced the Catholic ...
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32 views

He prefers hot weather like… "in the south - Why are there two prepositions?

I just joined after a few years of coming to your boards for advice as I need help with a specific sentence. "He likes warm weather LIKE IN SPAIN / LIKE IN THE SOUTH" Is "Like" ...
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2answers
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What is the meaning of “burning on you”?

Context: In one of the news articles, there was a statement like this: "Mayor, the city is burning on you". The article discusses protests and arsons in the city. What exactly "burning ...
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1answer
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Adjective or noun?

In the sentence "He became captain of the team", 'captain' (noun) is the subject complement of 'became' and 'of the team' (a PP) is the object complement of 'captain'. Since complements ...
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How to identify what a prepositional phrase is modifying?

He also forecast the usefulness of the medium for graphic artists in a letter. From that sentence, 'for graphic artists' modifies 'the usefulness of the medium' or ' the medium' ? And it seems that ...
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Can a relative pronoun give information about words in a prepositional phrase?

He was the most prominent of the French artists who welcomed photography as help-mate but recognized its limitations Does who (relative clause) give information about 'him' or 'French artists' ? ...
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For the 20 minutes cooking time

Leave the vegetables to steam over the rice for the 20 minutes cooking time https://www.collinsdictionary.com/es/diccionario/ingles-espanol/cooking-time Shouldn't the phrase be "for the 20 ...
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1answer
51 views

Is the phrase “in the weekend” really wrong? Or might there be some exceptions?

I have learned that "in the weekend" is a kind of weird expression, and that we should use "on the weekend" or "at the weekend" instead. I, however, noticed that the ...
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1answer
22 views

To follow a prepositional phrase with an imperative one

Except for Louisa, who’s away in Berlin this weekend, we’ll all be at the party. The first sentence is from Cambridge dictionary and hence I know it is correct. Fruits: Except for apples, eat them ...
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2answers
211 views

“I prefer riding to walking” VERSUS “I prefer to ride than to walk”

Original question: I prefer riding than/to walking I came across this exercise question in a book. The correct statement according to the book is: I prefer riding to walking Why is it to instead of ...
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1answer
31 views

just at the time that I dated my creation

The following sentence is from Frankenstein. Does the boldfaced prepositional phrase describe the time at which the speaker was seized with the nervous fever, or the time at which he remembered the ...
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1answer
36 views

none more so than for

Door entry systems place addition barriers for all those with communication difficulties none more so than for Laryngectomees. (You can find this sentence on the page below: https://publications....
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1answer
33 views

Do you use a definite article or zero article followed by a prepositional phrase

In the following two (similar) sentences the definite article is used in one, but not the other. 1 Capital letters are used for the names of people,places and languages. 2.Capital letters are used for ...
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23 views

Should prepositions be repeated while joining multiple prepositional phrases?

1.Results indicated positive paths from A to B, B to C, and C to A and B. 2.Results indicated positive paths from A to B, from B to C, and from C to A and B. Which of the above sentences is considered ...
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1answer
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“When the next semester commence…” or “When the next semester commences…”?

Which is correct? :"When the next semester commence..." or "When the next semester commences...".
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Can “both … and …” combine prepositional phrases?

Can "both ... and ..." combine prepositional phrases? For example His performance is a pride both for himself and for his country.
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1answer
82 views

“Object to” phrasal verb or not

He objected to the proposal. The above is a sentence to change into passive voice from a grammar book. The answer was also given. According to the Oxford dictionary, object is given as intransitive in ...
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1answer
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Using present perfect after the preposition “to”

I saw the following sentence in a movie: He seems to have come out of nowhere What is rule behind using present perfect after "seems to"
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2answers
36 views

Why doesn’t a verb’s indirect object have a preposition (like “to”) before it?

I don’t understand the grammatical rules behind this sentence: It is not showing us the question. I need to represent it like this: It is not showing the question to us. Lexico doesn't have ...
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By what kind of means

I had a sentence It was not very convenient to cut bread by knife Then I made it interrogative with a special question: By what was it not very convenient to cut bread? Then decided to change "by" ...
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2answers
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Can this prepositional phrase be considered an adverbial phrase?

In this sentence: "Tom is playing God of War at Tim's house." The prepositional phrase "at Tim's house" works as an adverbial phrase?
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Are “to reason out” and “for the sake of reasoning” fine as the adverbial conjunctions to start explaining the reason of something?

Suppose you want to explain the reason why an event occurred. I know I can say in myriad of different to say this, but I am specifically curious to know if I can use the infinite adverbial phrases as ...
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1answer
195 views

“under the sunlight” VS “in the sunlight” VS “under sunlight” VS “in sunlight”?

Suppose that you want to say that you have put your wet shirt outside so that the sunlight dries it off. Now if you want to mention the sunlight in your sentence with a prepositional phrase, how would ...
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1answer
72 views

potential ambiguity: in an hour

"in + a length of time" is said to have two meanings: before the end of a particular period (i.e., within a period fo time), or at the end of that period. How do we know which applies? Consider, for ...
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Is “It's in 240p” idiomatic?

What's the idiomatic way of saying this? Example: "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it's in 640p." "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it'...
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1answer
27 views

“another way for achieving” vs “another way of achieving”

Should it be for or of? And why? I have to find another way for achieving success. I have to find another way of achieving success.
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1answer
363 views

“For” VS “in” usage

Which preposition is right and which is wrong ? 1- We haven't been harnessing a lot of resources for the medical field. 2-We haven't been harnessing a lot of resources in the medical field.
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3answers
31 views

To infinitive it preposition

How to know that 'to' is infinitive particle or preposition? Which one is correct? Don't try to be smart. Don't try to being smart.(is to a preposition?) Stop trying(is trying a gerund here?) to be ...
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1answer
25 views

I am John Doe <of> CompanyName Corp.?

Instead of saying I am John Doe from CompanyName Corp. is it proper to say I am John Doe of CompanyName Corp. ?
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194 views

On top vs on the top vs at the top

Which preposition to use to describe the following: 1-Countries which are weak will become on top . 2-Countries which are weak will become on the top. 3- Counntries which are weak will become at ...
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1answer
33 views

What is the difference between “important for” and “important in”?

The Independent: maintaining independence is important in relationships. The Telegraph: Protein intake is also very important in building muscle. BBC: Meals are also important for building ...
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1answer
98 views

“out the window” vs. “out of the window”

What is the difference between the expression "out the window" and "out of the window"? I googled it but found conjectures of foreign speakers, only. One of the conjectures was that "out the window" ...
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1answer
6 views

Using the word “apart”

A doctor says " you have to take this medication 3 times a day" Does the following questions ok to be asked ? ( Grammatically speaking ) 1-How many hours apart are there between each time ? 2- ...
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1answer
26 views

Are “out, from, for, etc” adverbs or preps? Eg, “The noise came from under the sink”, “The shoes are for in the house”, “jump out of the plane”?

out 1 /aʊt/ ●●● S1 W1 adverb 1 FROM INSIDE from inside an object, container, building, or place OPP in She opened her suitcase and took out a pair of shoes. Lock the door on your way ...
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Definite article omission: “The ones with *the* black hair” vs “The ones with black hair”

I wonder which phrase is grammatically correct. the ones with the black hair the ones with black hair For me both sound right. But when I searched Google Books I found the second one to be ...
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2answers
24 views

Of me or for me?It took quite sometime of me to messaged you

It took quite sometime of me to messaged you. I was wondering if it's ok to say "of me" or "for me"
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'history of' vs 'history about'

Lovely community, when checking my review with the Grammarly Premium, in the sentence 'A Beautiful Mind' is a history about an extraordinary mathematician, John Nash. it underlined about and ...
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29 views

“Destroying of world” or “Destroying world”?

For meaning like "world destroying" or "destruction of world". What form should be used? What are their names, because in grammar rules of participle tense forms there are absolutely different ...
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2answers
247 views

'are of' and 'is of'

While I was reading a book, the following sentence caught my eye. Sincerity and courtesy are of desirable character traits. I saw this kind of sentence before, but never fully understood why the ...
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1answer
17 views

phrases with preposition 'for'

Is there any difference between the following two I would hate for anyone to hack into my emails. I would hate anyone to hack into my emails. I don't even know if the second is possible. I'm ...
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1answer
29 views

preposition choice: at/in hand

I'm wondering which preposition to use in the following. If both are acceptable, what is the difference? Our officers have to concentrate 100 per cent on the task at/in hand. Peter turned his ...
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115 views

A new cabinet has been sworn in (in) Dhaka

'Swear in' is a phrasal verb. Do I need to add another preposition after the phrasal verb - in this case 'in' - if I want to mention the name of the place?

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