Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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How to know which words are being modified by a prepositional phrase?

...the girl (by the table (with the carved legs). How to know whether the prepositional (with the carved legs) phrase is describing the girl or table? Are there any trick in grammar?
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Make comparison "For ” some indicators

For example, I want to express: I made a comparison between two companies "for" indicators like growth rate, profitability I am wondering what is the correct preposition to use. Should I ...
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Is the correct preposition used in: "Evaluating Xtool at/in Y"?

For an article title, I am thinking of using "Evaluating Xtool at/in Y", but I am not sure what preposition is correct. The tool "Xtool" can perform Y, being Y an expression, e.g. &...
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As what does phrase "to make me laugh" function in this example? (as an adjective or an adverb)

a video with title "Phrases" of a grammar teaching yt channel (minute 6:35) Speaking person in the video has written the sentence "I am looking for a book to make me laugh" and he ...
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What's the difference between "Behind you" and "with you"?

I am behind you all the way.(Sense-In support of) I am with you all the way. (Sense-In support of) Are there any difference in meaning?
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Books were in short supply. (prepositional phrase)

Books were in short supply. I wonder if the prepositional phrase 'in short supply' is an adverbial or adjectival phrase. And wonder whether the verb 'were' is used here to mean 'exist' like I 'am' in ...
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Role of like in copular/linking verbs

I'm struggling to make some distinctions regarding copular, or linking, verbs. She sounds like a lawyer. She has become like her mother. She looks like a princess. #1: Is "sounds" an ...
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Are the expressions "book about grammar" and "book on grammar" interchangeable?

A book about grammar. (A book relating to grammar) A book on grammar. (A book relating to grammar ) Can I interchangeably use both?
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Are there any difference between "of" and "about" in the context?

•Please, tell me about the new school . •Please, tell me of the new school.
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Choosing between "{ Once / By the time } Norma Jean had reached the age of twenty-six…"

______ Norma Jean had reached the age of twenty-six, her beautiful face and body earned her a place as one of America's leading movie stars My answer : once Correct answer: by the time Could you ...
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Comprehending the meaning and the following structure after But For

The following sentence is from the Wall Street Journal. The new Inflation Reduction Act has many damaging provisions, but for sheer government gall the $80 billion reward to the Internal Revenue ...
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What does "with" function as in this sentence? And what grammatical technique is this?

"The pandemic also shifted people’s work lives, with many professionals changing careers, starting business ventures or quitting their jobs altogether." Source: cnbc.com I have read about ...
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Can I use "in doing so at the end of sentences? Is it wrong to use the modal verb "would" in that sentence? [closed]

"Teenagers should study all subjects at school as their knowledge would increase in doing so."
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What does the preposition "off" mean in "I'm gonna pass you off to my colleague"?

This context comes from the movie "Ford vs Ferrari" It's a scene in which one of the characters sells a car to a customer. customer- You take cash? Is cash okay? seller- Cash is okay. ...
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in the morning of, on the morning of [closed]

The baby was born in the morning of June 3. The baby was born on the morning of June 3. Is there any difference between the two sentences in their meanings?
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parts of speech question (Subject + adjective + prepositional phrases)

He's married to the director. You should be proud of your progress. He's really good at English. She's excited about the new job. What part of speech do the bolded words play? Are they prepositional ...
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Confusion between adjectival phrase and adverbial phrase

I passed the ball to him. Here, is "to him" modifying the object "ball" or the action verb "passed"? How can we know for sure? I have been to several websites before I ...
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"many girls from poor families" VS " many girls in the school"

Which of these two prepositional phrases should immediately follow the noun phrase"many girls"? There are many girls from poor families in the school. There are many girls in the school ...
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Is it a participle or a gerund?

I made two sentences with a word I intended to use as a gerund. But I noticed that it seems like a participle, too. Can the word "having" I wrote below have the both roles? There are some ...
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"to the east" without "of something"

I'm learning the points of the compass, and the prepositions in, on, to. My book has one sentence Cars can park between the Community Hall and that line of trees to the east. So where exactly is the ...
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In preposition usage

Please help me understanding the usage of in Four in ten are employed full-time. {Does this mean 4 are working full-time and other 6 part-time} ​​​​ In indicates the style or composition of recorded ...
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Is " of him" or " for him " followed by the infinitive?

It's hard for you to make such a decision. It's very kind of you to see me off. Either of the above sentences works well. Here arises a question about how to use the prepositional phrase preceding ...
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Why move preposition phrase into the middle of a sentence [closed]

The <>and<> block corresponds to the use in English of the word ‘and’ to combine, into one, two statements about conditions that at any given time may or may not hold. Source: The Open ...
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What does "in the evening" refer to in "Read the letter that I wrote in the evening"?

Read the letter that I wrote in the evening. Is the above sentence read as: (Read the (letter that I wrote in the evening)). or (Read the (letter that I wrote) in the evening)? And is there a ...
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1 answer
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A question about a adverb phrase

We are here to provide the public with a service. In tasks candidates are presented with a point of view, argument and problem. Sources are Oxford learner's dictionaries ; provide and the ...
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He emptied his pockets of loose change. (meaning of 'of')

He emptied his pockets of loose change. My native language which is not English wants to rewrite the sentence as this: He got rid of loose change from his pockets. Or, He emptied his pockets (from ...
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Can "in favour of" be used in the context?

Will it make sense if I say, "Shopping will probably change in favour of delivery services". I would like to say that people will be opting for delivery services rather than go to shops. ...
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Are "on leaving school" and "after leaving school" the same?

I am working on IELTS Test Preparation. The original text writes: After leaving school, Moore hoped to become a sculptor, but instead he complied with his father’s wish that he train as a ...
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"pass the virus to somebody" vs "pass the virus on to somebody"

Can we use the phrases "pass a virus to someone" and "pass a virus on to someone" interchangeably? I am guessing the second example I gave below fine but how about the first one? I ...
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“on a day” vs “in a day”

Which one of these sentences is correct, or is either of them correct? I eat three tablespoons of molasses at most on a day. I eat three tablespoons of molasses at most in a day. Context: On a ...
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“Which pencil of mine”

Is this sentence correct? Which pencil of mine did you take? or is it grammatically wrong and I should say, “Which of my pencils did you take” which I am sure is grammatically correct? “Which pencil ...
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From the opponent team?

Can we write - "I won the match by 54 runs from the opponent team". The first half of the sentence is correct, I'm confused about "from the opponent team".
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Is 'next to the right/left of' the same as 'to the right/left of'?

Lin sits next to the right of Bea. 'next to' here indicates how many positions to the right of Bea?
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What kind of "a" movie do you like?

If I want to merely ask someone what kind of movie he/she likes. Can I say, “What kind of a movie do you like?” instead of “What kind of movie do you like?” I know we can use “kind of a” in a ...
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"grateful to God" or "grateful for God"

I am listening to English dialogues for learning purpose. I came across the following phrase in this video. At 10:45, he says, "I am really grateful for God". But most of the time, I have ...
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What was from the jungle in "jack ate apple on the table from the jungle", the apple or the table?

Jack ate apple on the table from the jungle. Does the sentence mean that apple was from the jungle or the table was from the jungle?
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Puctuation - comma before a prepositional phrase

They are soldiers who come to the battlefield armed with their respective murderous weapons. In a document about "Prepositional phrases and commas" it is said that we are supposed to add a ...
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“The town is (located) 20km southeast of city X” [closed]

The town is (located) 20 km southeast of city X Is southeast an adjective being modified by of city X (an adverb phrase) and having 20 km (an adverb) modifying it? Or is 20km an adjective modifying ...
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Using "on " as a preposition instead of "from"

I read the below text in a book in which the author used the preposition "on" in a new way to mean "from." she was brutally raped by a physician on the staff of the hospital. I am ...
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Can the phrase "out of" be used to specify part of the whole?

Only one out of twenty students in my class passed the test. I think the usage "out of" in the sentence above I created is correct, but I am unsure if the following usage is correct: This ...
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What's the difference between "Would you like to go on a long drive with me?" and "Would you like to go with me on a long drive?"

Would you like to go on a long drive with me? Would you like to go with me on a long drive? The position of "with me" is different in both of the above interrogative sentences. As per my ...
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Tidal current is setting in the direction of Northeast

I use marine English at work. Which one is correct? Tidal current is setting to the direction of Northeast. Tidal current is setting in the direction of Northeast.
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Maintaining the participial form of a phrase

I am looking at the following sentence: Aided by a strong magnetic field, the machine is expected to capture particles of higher momentum. I learnt from here that the participial phrase implies a ...
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"in the morning" vs "on cold mornings"

I always know is "in the morning" until I read this article "should I let my vehicle warm up on cold mornings?" Why did it use "on cold mornings" instead of "in cold ...
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"In which" vs "of which" in a sentence refereing to activities

Is using "of which" in the following sentence correct? can anyone tell me why it is correct and can we use "in which" instead of "of which"? I have taken the statistic ...
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Participle or Gerund when prepositions are present? [duplicate]

a) After having the meal, she went shopping. b) On being told the party was cancelled, the girl burst into tears. c) While walking along the street, Sandy answered. Please, advise whether the ing-...
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“They are mostly female.”

There are people. Eight of them are female, and two of them are male. I saw the dictionary express it as they are mostly female. But I want to use any prepositional phrase instead of “mostly.” In this ...
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What is the type of the phrase "to success"

The textbook says that To success is an adjective phrase but it seems like an infinitive to me. I'm confused whether it is a noun or an infinitive?
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“Let for each 𝑗” vs. “For each 𝑗 let”

I wrote Let for each 𝑗 < 𝑛 a permutation ℎ𝑗 : 𝐿 ↪ 𝐿 be given. A proofreader (whom I can no longer ask) changed it to For each 𝑗 < 𝑛, let a permutation ℎ𝑗 : 𝐿 ↪ 𝐿 be given. This ...
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using plural in prepositional phrase

what is the best way to use the plural in the below setance? studies were grouped according to the types and components of interventions or studies were grouped according to the type and components of ...

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