Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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27 views

Should it be considered as a prepositional phrase or a determiner?

He drank half of a half gallon of milk. Should I divide it into ‘of a half gallon’ and ‘of milk,’ or should I divide it into ‘half of’ and ‘a half gallon of’?
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Plural and singular nouns after preposition 'of' in grammar explanation resources

I have read a few explanations about how to use nouns in sentences. I found two common versions of the explanations. Nouns can be used as subjects of sentences. reference1 / reference2 Nouns can be ...
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Are there any rules for placing a noun after a preposition?

I still cannot master which form of nouns (singular or plural) should be placed before and after the preposition "of". For example, if I want to refer to one book of each student, which one ...
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Put salt on/ Add salt to fruits

Put salt on fruits. a) Is this sentence correct? Do we use 'put' with salt/ spices? Add salt to fruits. a) Same question. Is this one correct/ more natural? b) I need clarification about the ...
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Using “in between” as an adverb

Can we use “in between” when talking about something between two things when those two things are not specified? Example: Let’s say I am watching this video with a friend of mine. Can I say, “The cat ...
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Is the bold marked in the below sentence a prepositional phrase? If not what is it?

The budget proposes spending 24.5 percent of G.D.P. over the next decade, up from a baseline of 22.7 percent. In the above sentence, is the part marked bold a prepositional phrase? If not, what is it?...
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My sentence ended up having two adjacent “for”s. Is it grammatical?

I’m writing comments for my NGINX configuration and one of them got two adjacent “for”s. Should I avoid this construction, or is it just plain off? What would be better ways to phrase it? “Two ...
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<very well above>, <so well above>, <so much above>

Are the phrases “very well above,” “so well above,” and “so much above” correct? Example sentences: The bridge is very well above us. The bridge is so well above us! The bridge is so much above us! ...
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Can I use ‘as’ in this way?

I want to use ‘as’ in the sense of ‘in a way of.’ Does ‘he cut an apple with a toy as a knife’ make sense for me to express that a toy with which he cut an apple was used as a knife?
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To do something on your feet

Can we say that someone is doing something on his/her feet if that person is doing it in a standing position. For example, are sentences like the ones below correct? Everybody clapped the performers ...
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Can pronouns be modified

As far as I know, pronouns such as "it" cannot be modified like "beautiful it". However, from my experience, I have heard native speakers say things like "Enjoy it with your ...
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The position of “such as Google, Facebook, and Instagram”

I'd like to learn what places fit "such as Google, Facebook, and Instagram" in the following sentence. The internet brought new applications into our lives such as Google, Facebook, and ...
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What’s the difference between ‘from the sofa’ and ‘on the sofa’?

What is the difference between I turned on the TV from the sofa and I turned on the TV on the sofa ?
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What does it modify? The noun “heat” or the whole phrase “the value of heat”?

I'd like to learn what the part "for the preservation of food" modifies in the following sentence, the noun "heat" or the whole phrase "the value of heat" . The value of ...
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31 views

Difference between Gerund “verb + ing” and “having + past participle”

Can anyone explain what is the difference between these form of the gerund? He published his first book after having returned from Africa. He published his first book after returning from Africa. ...
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22 views

Can these questions be answered with these answers?

I am trying to reach the question form by going through its standard sentence form. In my native language, Turkish, The question form of I'm talking about the money that is for your education = I'm ...
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What did you give him money in exchange for?

I would like to learn if these kinds of questions are possible and correct in English. I think they are but I'm not sure. What did you give him the money in exchange for? In exchange for what did ...
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2answers
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Do we say someone has wrinkles “on” or “in” their forehead?

I asked some native speakers, and they all say that "she has wrinkles on her forehead". However, the dictionary says "He had deep wrinkles in his forehead." and "I tried to ...
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I'm talking about the truths for every human, hidden by some countries and that

I'm curious about the grammatical accuracy of the sentence below I'm talking about the truths for every human, hidden intentionally by some countries, about our future, and that we have to learn as ...
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Wish for vs Wish to

What is the difference between this two prepositional phrase? And how can we use this? Like Best wishes for you. Best wishes to you. What is the difference in meaning for both of these sentences?
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“In the meantime” vs. “for the meantime”

"In the meantime" and "for the meantime" are both listed in dictionaries. I'd lke to know which should be used in the following. If either is okay, is there a scenario where one ...
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Should I use 'kinds' or 'types' here, and in which position?

We can see four kinds of sentences. We can see sentences of four kinds. We use different types of sentences. We use sentences of different types. Here, do 1&2 and 3&4 have same meaning or ...
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how to interpret a prepositional phrase

Thank you for your time. Please take look at the following: "The passage is primarily with summarizing the reasons for the rejection of an establish theory by the scientific community." ...
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Correct word order in prepositional phrases of the type to be + verb + preposition

which are correct word orders for prepositional phrases of the type to be + verb + preposition? E.g., which of the following examples containing the phrase to be aware of are correct? ...the fact,...
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Is “without” a preposition or an adverb in “Without thinking where I was going”? Lexical word or grammatical word?

I'm doing my English homework and I have this doubt so I would appreciate your help. I need to know whether "without" is a preposition or an adverb in this specific sentence in order to ...
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When MUST we use noun phrase + adjective , not adjective + noun?

I always catch my students using adj + noun even when it's not suitable but I don't know how to explain why we can't always do that and what the rule is. For example: Mental health issue people need ...
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“A look of disgust” vs “A face of disgust” vs “A disgusted face”

Do you think the phrases, a look of disgust, a face of disgust, and a disgusted face can be used interchangeably? For example, do you think these sentences can be used interchangeably? John looked at ...
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“Cultured in” vs “Cultured at” vs “Cultured about”

Do you think we can use the phrases, cultured in, cultured at, and cultured about interchangeably? I couldn't find any examples of, "cultured," with any of, "in," "at," ...
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Question on omission of “by” and location of modifiers

I am a nonnative graduate student writing science related journals. Whenever I write related papers, there are always confusing parts, so I put up a questionnaire to clarify this. What I'm confused ...
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How to use preposition “like” in a question?

Which one is correct: What was the weather like in Toronto?" or "What was the weather in Toronto like?"
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How to use Lit by and Lit with properly?

The room is lit by/with candles. The house is lit by/with electricity. What should be the appropriate preposition for each sentence?
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Is comma obligatory after a prepositional phrase starting with “Under”: “Under our beef brand, we produce marbled beef”

Under our Sverdlovsk Beef brand, we produce marbled beef from Aberdeen bulls brought to Russia from Scotland. Is comma obligatory after "brand", or could this prepositional phrase be left ...
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Is this a correct analysis of an adverbial prepositional phrase?

I am trying to analyse what I judge a compound sentence with an adverbial phrase (in italics) placed at the beginning: In what turned out to be a common experience for many people who tried to create ...
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Is “from simple to complex” grammatically correct

I often read the phrase "from simple to complex" and wonder if it is grammatically correct. The reason for the doubt is that "simple" and "complex" are adjectives and I ...
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Is it correct to say you are talking “to Skype”?

Let's say you receive a message from someone but cannot talk to them because you are on a Skype call. Which is the correct preposition to use for saying that you are busy using Skype? "Sorry, I ...
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What are the differences between “clean in between the fingers” and “clean between the fingers”?

I'm teaching my little children to wash their hands. Why do people say "clean in between your fingers"? Why not "clean between your fingers"?
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Which preposition for “I have no doubt {of/for/about} his ability”?

I had taken a quiz at school, and it was as follows: Which one is correct: I have no doubt _____ his ability. a. of b. for c. about I've chosen "of" but the correct answer was "for&...
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Prepositional Phrases used as Noun Phrases?

The country’s Supreme Court ruled last year that the ban was illegal, and gave the Knesset, or parliament, until March 1st to amend the law to allow gay couples to commission surrogacies domestically. ...
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Prepositional Phrase vs Participle Phrase

Following the meeting, we all had a chat. In the above sentence, what is Following used as. Is it a adjective or preposition or both? Also,is following the meeting a prepositional phrase or participle ...
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Is correct to say “You press it on to a pad of ink” or should “onto” be always the right choice?

I just came across this two sentences: You press it onto an pad of ink./You press it on to an ink pad. Collins Cobuild. COBUILD Advanced Learner’s Dictionary KINDLE-ONLY EDITION (Posición en ...
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“In the (near) future” or “for the (near) future”

I am wondering what is the difference between the following two sentences: The aforementioned signs point to a water shortage in the near future. The aforementioned signs point to a water shortage ...
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Is this correct “with my head faced up” “with my face faced up”

I don't know if this expression is correct. I looked up at the sky, with my face faced up. I looked up at the sky, with my head faced up. with my face faced up with my head faced up
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I had a kind of feeling this might happen. (what is object?)

I had a kind of feeling this might happen. a kind feeling [a kind]noun of [feeling this might happen]noun phrase I wonder which object is correct.
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What is set here? (noun or past participle)

Are you tired of taking pictures with your camera set to “Auto”? Do you want to create more professional-looking photos? You won’t want to miss this opportunity. "set" is used as a noun as ...
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108 views

Is it correct to say 'now onwards'?

When mentioning time period, is it correct to use the phrase "now onwards"? can we use 'onwards' after 'now'? or should we use only 'now on'?
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What does “which” refer to in the below sentence?

This is a feature of a computer which is new in the market. Does the above mean that the feature is new in the market or that the computer is new in the market or both the feature and the computer ...
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In the sentence “we always buy toilet paper in bulk”, does 'in bulk' function as an adverb or adjective?

Does in bulk modify buy as in we buy loads of toilet paper or does it elaborate on the number of toilet papers we buy? Is one way of seeing it less wrong than the other? Based on my intuition, I am ...
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what does “not for” mean in the beginning of a sentence? And a sentence sans a main verb?

Silks, satins and brocades, elegant plumes and gemstones—details like these give Lievens ample scope to show off his flashy handling of his medium. Not for him the fastidious, enamel-smooth surfaces ...
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“Independently of one another” VS “ in a state of independence of one another”?

Similarly, vocal learners may have developed the ability independently of one another. (From the ACT) What does the prepositional phrase "of one another" function as here? Modifying "...
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When the object and the preposition phrase are interchangeable?

This kind of sentence is really prevalent in a variety of articles. He is hewing out of the stone a piece of precious gold. In my original thought, It should be like He is hewing a piece of ...

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