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Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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Noun phrase vs prepostional phrase

I am wondering if a noun phrase can contain a prepostional phrase? For example in this compound "the industrail revolution across this country" the whole compound is a noun phrase? Or just ...
Mahdis 's user avatar
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Prepositional phrase functioning as a direct object

In the following example: I told my friend about the book Is the prepositional phrase about the book functioning as a direct object? Or would it function as either an adjective or adverb. For me, ...
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Function of prepositional phrase after to+be

In the following example, I would like to know the function of the emboldened prepositional phrase: The park is my favorite place to be with my friends. My first guess is that the prepositional ...
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Difference between "play in defense", "play on defense" and "play defense"

two sentences from oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) (BrE): She plays in defence. (2) (AmE): She plays on defense. As far as I understood, (1) = (2). the explanation of "to play defense" ...
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"Items should be paid for within 14 days <of> <after> receipt." — What's the difference between "of" and "after" here?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com (item №2 -> Extra Examples): (1) Items should be paid for within 14 days of receipt. Seeing "of" is odd to me here. As far as I can guess, "of" ...
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"I didn’t see her again (until) a few days afterwards." — How does "until" affect the meaning of the sentence?

an example from a dictionary (I couldn't find its source now): (1) I didn’t see her again until a few days afterwards. my variant: (2) I didn’t see her again a few days afterwards. How does "...
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Confusing Components in a Sentence: adverbial modifier OR object in a prepositional phrase

I'm trying to understand the grammatical role of a phrase in a sentence. The sentence in question is: "And all without the government having to spend any money up-front, which is amazing." ...
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1) A dictionary says "on a weekend" is a British informal phrase. Is it so? 2) "On the weekend of" is used in US and "at the weekend of" in UK, right?

As I understood, "at" is used with "weekend" in UK and "on" in US. But there are some examples in a dictionary that confused me. oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: on a ...
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How to describe a position in English?

As I know, if there are two things distributed in front of me like below, I can say there two items going "left to right". If I want to specify a particular one, "the right one" or ...
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"I have no idea <of> what you're talking about." — By what rule can we take "of" away here?

my own examples: (1) No idea of what we will do occured to me. — I think it's correct. (2) No idea what we will do occured to me. — I think it's incorrect. That is, "of" is obligatory. ...
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Does "fostered out of a local tribe" mean the same thing as "fostered in a local tribe" here?

This context comes from the TV show "The Leftovers". The speakers are located in Australia. "One of Grace’s kids was fostered out of a local tribe. He loved boats. When his family found ...
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Is "during cold weather" a prepositional phrase? [closed]

In the following sentence is during cold weather a prepositional phrase? It has a very robust flavor and is traditionally consumed during cold weather.
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'For (his) betrayal, the general was simply demoted a little in rank.' vs. 'For the general's betrayal he was simply demoted a little in rank.'

I am trying to translate a sentence into English. Here is what I have got: For the general's betrayal, he was simply demoted a little in rank. For his betrayal, the general was simply demoted a ...
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create a tale to take in different aspects

We are self-centered interpreters of all incoming information. At any given moment, we may note only one aspect of a current flow of information, depending on our view of ourselves, our attention, and ...
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I learned much of my English watching

I learned much of my English vocabulary watching Hollywood movies. I learned much of my English vocabulary from watching Hollywood movies. I learned much of my English vocabulary by watching Hollywood ...
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Reference regarding prepositional phrases and collocations

Does anyone know any good reference (books,lecture notes or webpages, preferably books or lecture notes) to study prepositional phrases and collocations? By "good" I mean a reference with ...
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What does "with trolls" modify in "I have a special gift with trolls"?

"Certainly. I have a special gift with trolls, -- you must have seen what I did to the one in the chamber back there?" From Harry Potter and the Philosopher's/Sorcerer's Stone I really don'...
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Can I use "still" directly without verbs?

The radiant smile and the sparkle in her blue eyes were the clear signs of a woman still deeply in love. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/deeply "A woman still deeply in love&...
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adverb + prepositional phrase or prepositional phrase + prepositional phrase

A man in a black suit Can I say "a man warmly in a black suit" (a man who warmly wears a black suit) or "a man in a black suit like gentlemen" (a man who wears a black suit like ...
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Can the prepositional phrase "at ease" be used with "very"?

https://ludwig.guru/s/very+at+ease According to this, "at ease" is used with "very", is it grammatical? I've learnt that "very" can be used only with adjectives and ...
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Can I use "due to" as a noun modifier?

Low blood pressure due to dehydration can be treated by hydration. I made this sentence, but the main point is, can I use "due to" as a noun (low blood pressure) modifier?
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Why is the plural verb 'are' used in 'among the most eye-catching pieces in the whole collection are'?

For example, among the most eye-catching pieces in the whole collection are the marble animal sculptures under two arches on the left of the entrance hall. I think 'among the most eye-catching pieces ...
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I drank water in a cup

I mixed eggs in a bowl. (It means I put eggs in a bowl and mixed them). I baked bread in an oven. (It means I put bread in an oven and baked them). I drank water in a cup Logically, it should ...
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2 votes
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130 views

Can I use "out of order" like this?

The elevator out of order will be fixed. (without "which is") She put my computer out of order. Can I use "out of order" like this? I'm confused because there are like, "He ...
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Can I use "at risk" like adverbs?

I climbed the cliff at risk. I walked on the rope at risk. Are they all possible?
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118 views

"All outta angst" : derived from angst or free from angst?

A band NOFX has a song named "All Outta Angst". In my understanding, "outta" (out of) has several usages, including: "derived from" and "free from". All these ...
ŌHARA Kazutaka's user avatar
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3 answers
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can i start a sentence after a preposition? [closed]

I just want to make sure that I can start a sentence after a preposition. because I have seen some sentences that were started with prepositions like this In the closet is where I keep the dog food. ...
Sammed's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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"Reliable in/at/for V-ing" Which is grammatically correct?

For example, is any of the following sentences correct? He's always a reliable husband in providing both moral and financial support for her projects. He's always a reliable husband for providing ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can 'eliminate' be used as intransitive verb?

I know the verb 'eliminate' is used only as a transitive verb. However, I have read some articles which use the verb as an intransitive verb, without any objects. For example, Your dog should find a ...
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‎Right now, I am filing this insurance application on behalf of you. So, I need your confirmation (on the matter) - do I need "on the matter" here? [closed]

Example 1 ‎Whenever I'm talking about a controversial topic, I change my tone and pause a little bit. I want to make sure I have my listener's agreement . Example 2 Whenever I'm talking about a ...
vincentlin's user avatar
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Can a prepositional phrase be an object complement?

If yes, how not to confuse a prepositional phrase as an object complement and as an adverb. E.g "I consider you as a friend". Is "as a friend" an adverb implying "I'm your ...
Petro Probka's user avatar
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2 answers
69 views

What is the function of the phrase "with another car"?

He went off the road to avoid colliding with another car. What is the function of the phrase "with another car"?
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Using "beneath which" or just use "above"? [closed]

Choice A A bright sky far beneath which the square of this building. Choice B A bright sky far beneath which the square of this building is. Choice C A bright sky far above the square of this ...
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
295 views

prepositional phrases as direct /indirect objects

Please guide me to find the object. Example: Sally will help you with your housework. You - direct object. How do you eliminate "with your housework" as a direct object? Help what/help whom? ...
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What the phrase "for social reform" mean in this context?

**Martin Luther King, Jr., fought for social reform. Here,I think the adverbial phrase means:- For the Improvement of society as a whole.
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"On the tennis court", a prepositional phrase, in this context modifies what?

Althea Gibson was graceful on the tennis court. I learned it modifies the adjective graceful, but I have a doubt. Plz someone explain me clearly why it is so..
Sam's user avatar
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What is the role of "in the first inning" lexically?

In the first inning he pitched with great control. In the first inning, I think describe the whole sentence, but It might modify the verb pitched, What function the phrase has in the sentence??
Sam's user avatar
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what is the usage of "in" and "for" when referring to a period of time

Is this sentence: what china will be like in ten years? right or wrong? Can the phrase “be like” be used with the preposition “in”? When it refers to “after a period of time,” the preposition “in,” ...
Oliver898's user avatar
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Is "from her" modifying the flower or the verb buy?

No one wanted to buy a flower from her. "wanted" is transitive, flower is the direct object and I'm a little confused about the modifier "from her".
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
67 views

What's the meaning of "in rapid order"?

I will get it solved in rapid order. —Statement By D. Trump in a YouTube Short What's the meaning of the phrase?
Sam's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
162 views

Which I'm interested in vs. in which I'm interested

I recently stumbled across the following sentence: "Saving the planet is the topic in which I am interested the most." From my feel for language this sentence sounds good, but I would ...
dark_ursus's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
217 views

By most recognised standards—mean?

By most recognised standards, management qualifies as a science. I want to know the actual meaning of the phrase In which sense "standards" is being used here?
Sam's user avatar
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1 vote
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"XYZ is a website to improve English (on)" VS "XYZ is a good website to improve English (on)"

I am used to sentences like "XYZ is a good website to improve your English (on)" "XYZ is a great camera to film movies" "XYZ is an amazing ball to play street basketball (...
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1 vote
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<in the song of "beat it",> <in the movie of Doom> VS <in the song "beat it",> <in the movie Doom"

I know that we can say "In the song 'Beat It'" or "In the movie 'Doom'" like in I love the guitar solo in the song "Beat It" In the movie Doom, there is no part that ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Are these prepositional phrases?

"...in a process of reflection in which hopes, goals, and desires are transformed." "At its most simple, it..." "At its most complicated, it..." I think the last two ARE ...
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1 answer
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Prepositional phrases but what about for super long phrases?

"...consisting of direct and indirect interviews, archival footage, re-enactments, and montage sequences." "...created by Leanne Allison and Jeremy Mendes." "...forms ...
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1 answer
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varies according to the age of each group of students who vs. varies according to the age of each group of students that

Our approach to teaching varies according to the age of each group of students who start with us from the age of four, through primary and secondary school ages. Our approach to teaching varies ...
John Smith's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
610 views

It was a huge influence on/for/to me

I know that we can use “on” with “influence,” so I think it is fine to say a sentence like “Metallica was a huge influence on me.” But I wonder if it is also fine to use either “for” or “to” with it ...
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Where is the right correct for this prepositional phrase?

The man is wearing a scarf in the shop. 2 The man in the shop is wearing a scarf. The prepositional phrase is placed after the verb in (1) and after the noun in (2), so would you please help me to ...
Chi Trần's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
333 views

Identifying a prepositional phrase as an adverb or adjective

I am having a difficult time identifying whether the prepositional phrase in the following sentence is acting as an adverb or an adjective. Here is the sentence: Did they really buy all the guys ...
Lilith Eleanor's user avatar

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