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A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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“the family”, “in (time period) time”, and “there is”

I am sending the following text message to one of my clients. Good afternoon the X family! Just a heads up that in two weeks time, on September 3, there is Labor day and the company does not ...
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Through Verb+ing

contribute to health care in an effective way through 'the delivery' of accurate diagnosis as well as 'increasing' our understanding of diseases. Is this form acceptable? I know that you can write ...
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Is there any difference in meaning between these two sentences? [on hold]

How far to the darkness will he go? How far will he go to the darkness? How should the prepositional phrase be placed? Are they both considered correct?
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blow out / blow off / blow away

What prepositions should I use in here: I wiped with eraser what he had drawn with a pencil on paper and blew out the garbage on him. Blew out / away / off the garbage "on" / or "in" him?
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Why is “on the season” used in this sentence?

The 5-foot-8 midfielder scored a goal and notched an assist for three total points on the season. (The San Diego Union Tribune) I thought the preposition in usually collocates with season. Why is it ...
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Proving for someone that “Clothes don't present me”?

I want to defend my dress by saying that clothes (in general) don't present me, but after that, I want to support that sentence by adding one of these two: I'm a lot bigger than a piece of cloth to ...
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24 views

'get up to speed with' or 'get up to speed on'

A) We work to ensure that our technical staff are up to speed on new technologies. B) We work to ensure that our technical staff are up to speed with new technologies. C) We work to ensure ...
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Parenthetical Phrase? Preposition? Hyphens?

I had a dialogue. with someone. They sent something like: When it comes to work, I like structure and being detail-oriented. Should I call this a parenthetical phrase or preposition? I thought ...
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There is to such thing [closed]

“Talk of inspiration is sheer nonsense; there is to such thing. It is mere a matter of craftsmanship.” — William Morris I don't understand the quote, particularly the part I highlighted. I am ...
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what preposition is particularly followed by ‘communicate’ in terms of conveying message to the reader?

I find the verb ‘communicate’ a bit confusing when it comes to use preposition. Can I use ‘with’ when accompanying by someone/something? For example: Poets communicate with poetic devices. Writers ...
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Why has “to” been omitted in “We walk home everyday”?

I'm studying an English book instruction (Elementary 2). In a grammar part I've a sentence like this: We walk home everyday. but my knowledge says it's wrong and it has omitted "to" before "...
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after retired or after retiring or after retirement?

I am preparing a speech about the life after retire. But not sure which one is correct below. After retire, I want to be a happy person. After retirement, I want to be a happy person. ...
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Usage of “in” or 'on' with ''deal'

I came across the following two sentences, but I can't find out the reason or different meaning in two sentence for using on and in before the deal. Could I switch them around? There is talk that ...
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“With Maria we/I solved the problems”

Assume the following: There were problems and Maria and I solved them together. The most straight forward way of telling someone about what happened would be something like: Maria and I solved the ...
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“One Sunday afternoon” or “On one Sunday afternoon”: is the preposition optional?

Is the preposition on optional or not needed in sentences with time period phrases? One sun-drenched afternoon Mick and I had just been horse riding and we were walking back up to his house for ...
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These terms are important for me to work here happily

Can I use infinitive clauses in that way? 1-) These terms are important for me to work here happily. 2-) These terms are important to work here happily.(If it is obvious that I am talking ...
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Do we have to use adjective complements just after adjectives?

Examples: I had already been very sorry but with your behaviour, I was extremely disappointed. (Instead of "but I was extremely disappointed with your behaviour") I was good at software ...
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After whom are you looking? At what are you looking?

The Cambridge dictionary says: "Prepositional verbs have two parts: a verb and a preposition which cannot be separated from each other." If they cannot be separated, does it mean that we can't ...
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I prevented you from going there

I prevented you from going there. What is the function of "from going there" ? I think that it is an adverbial prepositional phrase because I have studied object complements and learned that ...
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Which should be use ~swap over or swap with

Swap big portions of food over or with smaller ones. Thank you.
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“for a walk to the seashore” or “to the seashore for a walk”

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? Are both grammatically correct? I sometimes go out for a walk to the seashore. I sometimes go out to the seashore for a walk.
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The complements of linking verbs

We know that the complements of action verbs can be neither an adjective nor a prepositional phrase, but, it seems that that situation changes for linking verbs. He was upstairs. "Upstairs" ...
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Prepositional phrase after the verb “was"

What is the role of the prepositional phrase with his friend in the sentence below: He was with his friend when I saw him today. Does it function as an adverbial or complement?
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the roles of prepositional phrases

I'm having a hard time determining what is the role of the prepositional phrase in the example below: The best swimmer in the world is my brother. Is it an adverbial or a post modifier?
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How scared are you of snakes?

Do you think that it is grammatically correct to ask questions by leaving adjective complements alone? How happy are you about the exam results? How disappointed were you with my last ...
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Difference between in/on a social network

What's the difference between in/on a social network? For example, "If two individuals are friends in/on a social network, they ...".
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This bed has not been slept in … ? “for a long time by anybody” vs “by anybody for a long time”

This bed has not been slept in for a long time by anybody. This bed has not been slept in by anybody for a long time. Which is grammatically correct? Or, is there a difference between the two ...
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prepositional phrases

i have two sentences , both having prepositional phrase (PP) " for safe passage" as in example below--- The jagged rocks made him steer the boat carefully for safe passage.---------(1) The jagged ...
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“What should we do IN / FOR the rest of the day?” – can I omit the preposition entirely?

A very short question: is the following sentence correct? What should we do (...) the rest of the day? Could the sentence do without a preposition (in, for), or is one needed?
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Emphasize vs emphasize on [closed]

Are these sentences correct? Some schools emphasize physical education. Some schools emphasize on physical education. Some schools lay emphasis on physical education. Thanks.
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prepositional pattern with choice of prepositions (“to” vs. “for”)

Now I am learning about prepositional patterns, but I have questions about when to use proper prepositions. Here's question sentences I gave a book to John. I gave a book for John. He brought a ...
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Is a preposition missing/misplaced in this sentence from an NYT article?

I have read this sentence below several times, but can't be sure if the last clause is grammatical. Our reactions to these foods are often instructive about our own prejudices on how to eat and are ...
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I am following up as to

I spoke with an attorney on the phone yesterday and he said he would get back to me with regards a quote for the service I was requesting. I am writing a follow-up email to him today to see if he has ...
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Is this Sentence Correct? “I am accusing him because of the mistake”

I was interested in English since when I have started to understand English. Now when I'm learning "Prepositions", I've figured out that:- i) We have to use Accuse of as you can see in this ...
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Turn into, Change to or Become

Is this a correct statement? As the parameter increases, the distribution turns from right-skewed into left-skewed. Or should I use As the parameter increases, the distribution changes from ...
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Question on active and passive voice

WE can correct the below sentence by adding "was" before assigned verb A new textbook focused on recent advances in artificial intelligence assigned by our instructor. But why do we want to ...
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“Membership **to** physics-related entities”?

This is a question that cropped-up while John Doe was preparing the English version of his CV. He wanted to include a section wherein he was to list some of the physics societies to which he belongs. ...
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The use of preposition with time

Going off of this question: "This semester" or "In this semester"? Having read through the question, its answers, and the discussion in comments, I would like to get to the ...
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Is there a difference in meaning between these sentences using preposition “of”?

First sentence: Protection of privacy and personal information on the internet and social media Second sentence: Privacy and personal information protection on the internet and social media If ...
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Can a preposition modifies a prepositional phrase?

Unless an order from the Reading Nook's online store is paid for by the deadline indicated, the books cannot be shipped and the order will be canceled. Can a preposition modifies a prepositional ...
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How “in operation ” differs from “operating”

Do Not Open While Machine Is In Operation. Do Not Talk To Operator While Machine Is In Operation I found safety signs describing such sentences as described above. Is it possible to replace the ...
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Plane took off [from] the runway

What if a phrasal verb ends in the preposition needed to connect a noun? The plane took off the runway. (The plane was ON the runway, and therefore preposition OFF is preferred) The plane took ...
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“Day of month, morning” vs “Morning, day of month”

You know the date format in American English is different from British English. So I wonder if there is a pattern when referring to parts of the day and days within a month. Which sounds more natural? ...
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“at this scale” vs “on this scale”

When scale is used figuratively, which preposition is right: on or at? Example: On/at this inter-national scale, your bank is so small that it is virtually invisible. If large banks go bust, so ...
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35 views

When to use “up” and “down”

How do you determine when to say "drive down there/here", and "drive up there/here", or "I'm shooting down the street", as opposed to "shooting up the street". Or, "What the hell is going on up in ...
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How can I intuitively know that the “in” in “in 3 days” means “after”?

I learn from answers of this and this question that: "in 3 days" implies after 3 days or approximately after 3 days. It seems very counterintuitive, to a Chinese at least. How can I intuit that ...
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Can “in noncontact with” be used as an antonym of “in contact with”?

The magnet force keeps the objects in contact with each other. I am trying to rewrite the sentence above I created such that it has an opposite meaning. My examples are as follows: The magnet ...
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'Pass something on (to somebody)' - what does 'on' mean?

I'm not a native-speaker; sometimes prepositions (or adverbs) are tricky for non-native speakers. "Pass the book on to me when you've finished with it." In this sentence, I don't know what does 'on' ...
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For sentence of “She uses to her advantage” , why can a VT “use” accompany with a PP “to her advantage”?

The original sentence is "she has this apparent innocence which, I suspect, she uses to her advantage." (Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary, 4th). I understand that "she has this apparent ...
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How to know when to use prepositions with transitive or intransitive verbs

Consider this phrase "skimp on the time" vs " skimp the time" Are both correct? considering that skimp is both transitive and intransitive Collins dictionary shows example sentence without use of "...