Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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28 views

none more so than for

Door entry systems place addition barriers for all those with communication difficulties none more so than for Laryngectomees. (You can find this sentence on the page below: https://publications....
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Do you use a definite article or zero article followed by a prepositional phrase

In the following two (similar) sentences the definite article is used in one, but not the other. 1 Capital letters are used for the names of people,places and languages. 2.Capital letters are used for ...
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Should prepositions be repeated while joining multiple prepositional phrases?

1.Results indicated positive paths from A to B, B to C, and C to A and B. 2.Results indicated positive paths from A to B, from B to C, and from C to A and B. Which of the above sentences is considered ...
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“When the next semester commence…” or “When the next semester commences…”?

Which is correct? :"When the next semester commence..." or "When the next semester commences...".
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Can “both … and …” combine prepositional phrases?

Can "both ... and ..." combine prepositional phrases? For example His performance is a pride both for himself and for his country.
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1answer
53 views

“Object to” phrasal verb or not

He objected to the proposal. The above is a sentence to change into passive voice from a grammar book. The answer was also given. According to the Oxford dictionary, object is given as intransitive in ...
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1answer
13 views

Using present perfect after the preposition “to”

I saw the following sentence in a movie: He seems to have come out of nowhere What is rule behind using present perfect after "seems to"
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2answers
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Why doesn’t a verb’s indirect object have a preposition (like “to”) before it?

I don’t understand the grammatical rules behind this sentence: It is not showing us the question. I need to represent it like this: It is not showing the question to us. Lexico doesn't have ...
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By what kind of means

I had a sentence It was not very convenient to cut bread by knife Then I made it interrogative with a special question: By what was it not very convenient to cut bread? Then decided to change "by" ...
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2answers
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Can this prepositional phrase be considered an adverbial phrase?

In this sentence: "Tom is playing God of War at Tim's house." The prepositional phrase "at Tim's house" works as an adverbial phrase?
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Are “to reason out” and “for the sake of reasoning” fine as the adverbial conjunctions to start explaining the reason of something?

Suppose you want to explain the reason why an event occurred. I know I can say in myriad of different to say this, but I am specifically curious to know if I can use the infinite adverbial phrases as ...
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“under the sunlight” VS “in the sunlight” VS “under sunlight” VS “in sunlight”?

Suppose that you want to say that you have put your wet shirt outside so that the sunlight dries it off. Now if you want to mention the sunlight in your sentence with a prepositional phrase, how would ...
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potential ambiguity: in an hour

"in + a length of time" is said to have two meanings: before the end of a particular period (i.e., within a period fo time), or at the end of that period. How do we know which applies? Consider, for ...
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2answers
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Is “It's in 240p” idiomatic?

What's the idiomatic way of saying this? Example: "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it's in 640p." "The compression algorithm used on that video makes it look like it'...
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1answer
27 views

“another way for achieving” vs “another way of achieving”

Should it be for or of? And why? I have to find another way for achieving success. I have to find another way of achieving success.
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1answer
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“For” VS “in” usage

Which preposition is right and which is wrong ? 1- We haven't been harnessing a lot of resources for the medical field. 2-We haven't been harnessing a lot of resources in the medical field.
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3answers
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To infinitive it preposition

How to know that 'to' is infinitive particle or preposition? Which one is correct? Don't try to be smart. Don't try to being smart.(is to a preposition?) Stop trying(is trying a gerund here?) to be ...
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I am John Doe <of> CompanyName Corp.?

Instead of saying I am John Doe from CompanyName Corp. is it proper to say I am John Doe of CompanyName Corp. ?
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On top vs on the top vs at the top

Which preposition to use to describe the following: 1-Countries which are weak will become on top . 2-Countries which are weak will become on the top. 3- Counntries which are weak will become at ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between “important for” and “important in”?

The Independent: maintaining independence is important in relationships. The Telegraph: Protein intake is also very important in building muscle. BBC: Meals are also important for building ...
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“out the window” vs. “out of the window”

What is the difference between the expression "out the window" and "out of the window"? I googled it but found conjectures of foreign speakers, only. One of the conjectures was that "out the window" ...
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1answer
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Using the word “apart”

A doctor says " you have to take this medication 3 times a day" Does the following questions ok to be asked ? ( Grammatically speaking ) 1-How many hours apart are there between each time ? 2- ...
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1answer
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Are “out, from, for, etc” adverbs or preps? Eg, “The noise came from under the sink”, “The shoes are for in the house”, “jump out of the plane”?

out 1 /aʊt/ ●●● S1 W1 adverb 1 FROM INSIDE from inside an object, container, building, or place OPP in She opened her suitcase and took out a pair of shoes. Lock the door on your way ...
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Definite article omission: “The ones with *the* black hair” vs “The ones with black hair”

I wonder which phrase is grammatically correct. the ones with the black hair the ones with black hair For me both sound right. But when I searched Google Books I found the second one to be ...
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Of me or for me?It took quite sometime of me to messaged you

It took quite sometime of me to messaged you. I was wondering if it's ok to say "of me" or "for me"
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'history of' vs 'history about'

Lovely community, when checking my review with the Grammarly Premium, in the sentence 'A Beautiful Mind' is a history about an extraordinary mathematician, John Nash. it underlined about and ...
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“Destroying of world” or “Destroying world”?

For meaning like "world destroying" or "destruction of world". What form should be used? What are their names, because in grammar rules of participle tense forms there are absolutely different ...
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2answers
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'are of' and 'is of'

While I was reading a book, the following sentence caught my eye. Sincerity and courtesy are of desirable character traits. I saw this kind of sentence before, but never fully understood why the ...
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1answer
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phrases with preposition 'for'

Is there any difference between the following two I would hate for anyone to hack into my emails. I would hate anyone to hack into my emails. I don't even know if the second is possible. I'm ...
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preposition choice: at/in hand

I'm wondering which preposition to use in the following. If both are acceptable, what is the difference? Our officers have to concentrate 100 per cent on the task at/in hand. Peter turned his ...
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1answer
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A new cabinet has been sworn in (in) Dhaka

'Swear in' is a phrasal verb. Do I need to add another preposition after the phrasal verb - in this case 'in' - if I want to mention the name of the place?
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Is it possible to use a verb directly after a prepositional phrase?

Is it possible to use a verb directly after a prepositional phrase? For example, Is the sentence of "In this picture are some wonderful details" correct? thanks
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what is the punctuation for “most/ first/ worst of all” and sentence start with “in”?

what is the punctuation before and after for "most of all", "first of all" and or "worst of all", when they are used at the beginning, in the middle and or at the end of a sentence? some sentence ...
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Different prepositions for enumerations, do you need to repeat the adjective

I have the following sentence and I am wondering if there is a rule or heuristic how to formulate enumerations with the same adjective and different prepositions correctly. Recently, I managed to ...
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agreed to vs agreed on. Are they interchangeable?

Collins: The warring sides have agreed on an unconditional ceasefire. All 100 senators agree to a postponement. According to the definition, "agree to" implies "something to do", but they ...
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0answers
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Is this sentence correct? Prepositional phrase after Subject Complement (Predicate Nominative)

That is I in the picture. Is this sentence correct? Can I use a Prepositional Phrase after Subject Complement (Predicate Nominative)?
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1answer
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Police searched the house [preposition/ prepositional phrase] the murder case. Fill the blank

If police carry out some investigative activities (for example, interrogation) as part of an investigation of some particular case, how can denote the connection between the former and the latter (...
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1answer
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Prepositions used with 'common'

Is the sentence, "There is nothing common between you and me." wrong grammatically? If yes, why? Should it be, "There is nothing in common between you and me."?
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“In / with the same amount of time” in this context

I give tuition classes to three children in the evening. My friend yesterday told me that I can include few more children in the same batch. and I can make more money with / in the same amount of ...
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recommend to someone or recommend someone [duplicate]

I want to know which is correct I will definitely recommend my friends and relatives to book your hotel for special occasions. I will definitely recommend to my friends and relatives to book ...
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30 views

Is it possible to use a bare infinitive for the object of an “of”?

For example, "I described the scene of him drive away."
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Prepositional Phrases as Subjects - Subject-verb agreement

http://www.softschools.com/examples/grammar/functioning_as_a_noun_examples/97/ From this page above, I found some examples showing prepositional phrases as subjects, but the predicate nouns are all ...
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“Use 37 minutes” or “Use at 37 minutes”?

I am doing my homework and I have to write how to cook a curry, I want it to be grammatically correct. Which one of these is correct? Use the spices 37 minutes before the curry is ready or Use ...
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37 views

Constituency tests — is a phrase like this a constituent?

When we have a sentence with a strange syntactic position, how do we know if a phrase is a constituent? For example, "The two shortest of the books" Is [of the books] a constituent? I tried ...
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2answers
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On separating two prepositional phrases with a comma followed by and

Is it grammatical to separate the two prepositional phrases (P.P) by a comma in The truth is that after hospitals are hit, and in areas like this where there is just one hospital, our houses have ...
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How to choose between prepositions “of” and “from”?

In a class context, and talking about the homework that is due for today, is it better for a student to say: "For today, we had to learn parts 1 and 2 OF the lesson", or "parts 1 and 2 FROM the lesson"...
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223 views

“I learn a lot talking to you” vs. “I learn a lot by talking to you” [duplicate]

I've heard both of the sentences: I learn a lot talking to you. I learn a lot by talking to you. Does the first one means I learn a lot while I talk to someone and the second I learn a lot as ...
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1answer
31 views

In “With money in his pocket, he set off”, what is “in his pocket” modify?

By comparing these two sentences: He has money in his pocket. With money in his pocket, he set off. It seems that "in his pocket" is modifying "with" in the sentence. Is it true? If so, it means the ...
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Sentence starting with a prepositional phrase

This is from a TOEFL practice book: Of all the lawsuits in the world, _____ in US courts. A. Filed 95 percent of them B. 95 percent of them are filed C. That filed are 95 percent of them D. Which ...
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I am with them in Paris/ I am in Paris with them

Is there any difference between I am with them in Paris and I am in Paris with them.

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