Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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Do you use a definite article or zero article followed by a prepositional phrase

In the following two (similar) sentences the definite article is used in one, but not the other. 1 Capital letters are used for the names of people,places and languages. 2.Capital letters are used for ...
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4k views

He [Climbed / Climbed up] a tree

He [Climbed / Climbed up] a tree Does using climb or climb up in the above sentence makes any difference ? I think the only difference is while using the latter one one is specifying the direction i....
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208 views

“But, along with the street lamp, everything breathes deceit.", prepositional phrase?

“But, along with the street lamp, everything breathes deceit. It lies all the time, this Nevsky Prospect, but most of all at the time when night heaves its dense mass upon it and sets off the white ...
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1answer
33 views

“What is the opposite word for X?” Is the sentence correct?

I always use: What is the opposite of X ? But today I came across: What is the opposite word for X ? Are the both grammatical? Thank you.
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184 views

Why isn't “On the bottom of the MetroCard are three arrows” written “On the bottom of the MetroCard THERE are three arrows”?

Recently I found this sentence: On the bottom of the MetroCard are three arrows and little white letters that say "Insert this way/This side facing you." This sentence is correct, but I do not ...
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34 views

What did you give him money in exchange for?

I would like to learn if these kinds of questions are possible and correct in English. I think they are but I'm not sure. What did you give him the money in exchange for? In exchange for what did ...
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1answer
30 views

“Cultured in” vs “Cultured at” vs “Cultured about”

Do you think we can use the phrases, cultured in, cultured at, and cultured about interchangeably? I couldn't find any examples of, "cultured," with any of, "in," "at," ...
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50 views

Which preposition for “I have no doubt {of/for/about} his ability”?

I had taken a quiz at school, and it was as follows: Which one is correct: I have no doubt _____ his ability. a. of b. for c. about I've chosen "of" but the correct answer was "for&...
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34 views

Does “up” act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
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34 views

He prefers hot weather like… "in the south - Why are there two prepositions?

I just joined after a few years of coming to your boards for advice as I need help with a specific sentence. "He likes warm weather LIKE IN SPAIN / LIKE IN THE SOUTH" Is "Like" ...
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Should prepositions be repeated while joining multiple prepositional phrases?

1.Results indicated positive paths from A to B, B to C, and C to A and B. 2.Results indicated positive paths from A to B, from B to C, and from C to A and B. Which of the above sentences is considered ...
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1k views

“For” VS “in” usage

Which preposition is right and which is wrong ? 1- We haven't been harnessing a lot of resources for the medical field. 2-We haven't been harnessing a lot of resources in the medical field.
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514 views

On top vs on the top vs at the top

Which preposition to use to describe the following: 1-Countries which are weak will become on top . 2-Countries which are weak will become on the top. 3- Counntries which are weak will become at ...
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32 views

'history of' vs 'history about'

Lovely community, when checking my review with the Grammarly Premium, in the sentence 'A Beautiful Mind' is a history about an extraordinary mathematician, John Nash. it underlined about and ...
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44 views

agreed to vs agreed on. Are they interchangeable?

Collins: The warring sides have agreed on an unconditional ceasefire. All 100 senators agree to a postponement. According to the definition, "agree to" implies "something to do", but they ...
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17 views

Prepositions used with 'common'

Is the sentence, "There is nothing common between you and me." wrong grammatically? If yes, why? Should it be, "There is nothing in common between you and me."?
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19 views

Sentence starting with a prepositional phrase

This is from a TOEFL practice book: Of all the lawsuits in the world, _____ in US courts. A. Filed 95 percent of them B. 95 percent of them are filed C. That filed are 95 percent of them D. Which ...
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46 views

Can a relativizer be modified by PP phrase

The level of responsibility which the client carries for the whole development process with time & materials is much higher than with fixed-price or milestone projects. It can be understood that ...
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2answers
2k views

Which should be used: 'swap over' or 'swap with'?

Which of the following should be used: Swap big portions of food over smaller ones. Or Swap big portions of food with smaller ones. Thank you.
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1answer
158 views

“since late on the previous evening”

I read this sentence in a book: He has been unconscious since late on the previous Saturday evening. I am wondering about this construction. I thought it should be "since late the previous ...
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7k views

“For” vs “in”: which will be correct to use?

Context: Good luck "in" your future endeavors. Good luck "for" your future endeavors. So which is right grammatically? They are both on the internet. I am confused!!!!
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643 views

“To analyze” or “for analysis”?

Should I say: "Acoustic parameters of these sentences were extracted to analyze. " or "Acoustic parameters of these sentences were extracted for analysis. " Or anything else?
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1answer
637 views

What is an object of a preposition

What does it mean "object of a preposition"? Could you explain it by one or two example sentences?
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21 views

I'm talking about the truths for every human, hidden by some countries and that

I'm curious about the grammatical accuracy of the sentence below I'm talking about the truths for every human, hidden intentionally by some countries, about our future, and that we have to learn as ...
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22 views

Should I use 'kinds' or 'types' here, and in which position?

We can see four kinds of sentences. We can see sentences of four kinds. We use different types of sentences. We use sentences of different types. Here, do 1&2 and 3&4 have same meaning or ...
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19 views

Correct word order in prepositional phrases of the type to be + verb + preposition

which are correct word orders for prepositional phrases of the type to be + verb + preposition? E.g., which of the following examples containing the phrase to be aware of are correct? ...the fact,...
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16 views

Is “without” a preposition or an adverb in “Without thinking where I was going”? Lexical word or grammatical word?

I'm doing my English homework and I have this doubt so I would appreciate your help. I need to know whether "without" is a preposition or an adverb in this specific sentence in order to ...
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29 views

When MUST we use noun phrase + adjective , not adjective + noun?

I always catch my students using adj + noun even when it's not suitable but I don't know how to explain why we can't always do that and what the rule is. For example: Mental health issue people need ...
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55 views

“A look of disgust” vs “A face of disgust” vs “A disgusted face”

Do you think the phrases, a look of disgust, a face of disgust, and a disgusted face can be used interchangeably? For example, do you think these sentences can be used interchangeably? John looked at ...
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1answer
23 views

How to use Lit by and Lit with properly?

The room is lit by/with candles. The house is lit by/with electricity. What should be the appropriate preposition for each sentence?
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Is this a correct analysis of an adverbial prepositional phrase?

I am trying to analyse what I judge a compound sentence with an adverbial phrase (in italics) placed at the beginning: In what turned out to be a common experience for many people who tried to create ...
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58 views

“In the (near) future” or “for the (near) future”

I am wondering what is the difference between the following two sentences: The aforementioned signs point to a water shortage in the near future. The aforementioned signs point to a water shortage ...
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Is this correct “with my head faced up” “with my face faced up”

I don't know if this expression is correct. I looked up at the sky, with my face faced up. I looked up at the sky, with my head faced up. with my face faced up with my head faced up
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In the sentence “we always buy toilet paper in bulk”, does 'in bulk' function as an adverb or adjective?

Does in bulk modify buy as in we buy loads of toilet paper or does it elaborate on the number of toilet papers we buy? Is one way of seeing it less wrong than the other? Based on my intuition, I am ...
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17 views

Because of or Due to?

The original sentence is from website A current-carrying wire in a magnetic field must therefore experience a force due to the field In this case, I think "due to" emphasises the noun &...
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54 views

How to identify what a prepositional phrase is modifying?

He also forecast the usefulness of the medium for graphic artists in a letter. From that sentence, 'for graphic artists' modifies 'the usefulness of the medium' or ' the medium' ? And it seems that ...
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38 views

For the 20 minutes cooking time

Leave the vegetables to steam over the rice for the 20 minutes cooking time https://www.collinsdictionary.com/es/diccionario/ingles-espanol/cooking-time Shouldn't the phrase be "for the 20 ...
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23 views

“When the next semester commence…” or “When the next semester commences…”?

Which is correct? :"When the next semester commence..." or "When the next semester commences...".
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12 views

Can “both … and …” combine prepositional phrases?

Can "both ... and ..." combine prepositional phrases? For example His performance is a pride both for himself and for his country.
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14 views

Using present perfect after the preposition “to”

I saw the following sentence in a movie: He seems to have come out of nowhere What is rule behind using present perfect after "seems to"
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16 views

By what kind of means

I had a sentence It was not very convenient to cut bread by knife Then I made it interrogative with a special question: By what was it not very convenient to cut bread? Then decided to change "by" ...
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2answers
12 views

Can this prepositional phrase be considered an adverbial phrase?

In this sentence: "Tom is playing God of War at Tim's house." The prepositional phrase "at Tim's house" works as an adverbial phrase?
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Are “to reason out” and “for the sake of reasoning” fine as the adverbial conjunctions to start explaining the reason of something?

Suppose you want to explain the reason why an event occurred. I know I can say in myriad of different to say this, but I am specifically curious to know if I can use the infinite adverbial phrases as ...
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39 views

Are “out, from, for, etc” adverbs or preps? Eg, “The noise came from under the sink”, “The shoes are for in the house”, “jump out of the plane”?

out 1 /aʊt/ ●●● S1 W1 adverb 1 FROM INSIDE from inside an object, container, building, or place OPP in She opened her suitcase and took out a pair of shoes. Lock the door on your way ...
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“Destroying of world” or “Destroying world”?

For meaning like "world destroying" or "destruction of world". What form should be used? What are their names, because in grammar rules of participle tense forms there are absolutely different ...
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39 views

Constituency tests — is a phrase like this a constituent?

When we have a sentence with a strange syntactic position, how do we know if a phrase is a constituent? For example, "The two shortest of the books" Is [of the books] a constituent? I tried ...
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64 views

Adjective clauses and PP phrases

Brands often have clearly defined images or ‘personalities’ created by product advertising, packaging, branding and other marketing strategies that focus on positioning a product a certain way or by ...
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I prevented you from going there

I prevented you from going there. What is the function of "from going there" ? I think that it is an adverbial prepositional phrase because I have studied object complements and learned that ...
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1answer
436 views

The complements of linking verbs

We know that the complements of action verbs can be neither an adjective nor a prepositional phrase, but, it seems that that situation changes for linking verbs. He was upstairs. "Upstairs" ...
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34 views

How scared are you of snakes?

Do you think that it is grammatically correct to ask questions by leaving adjective complements alone? How happy are you about the exam results? How disappointed were you with my last ...