Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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2answers
912 views

Which should be used: 'swap over' or 'swap with'?

Which of the following should be used: Swap big portions of food over smaller ones. Or Swap big portions of food with smaller ones. Thank you.
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684 views

“for a walk to the seashore” or “to the seashore for a walk”

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? Are both grammatically correct? I sometimes go out for a walk to the seashore. I sometimes go out to the seashore for a walk.
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368 views

The complements of linking verbs

We know that the complements of action verbs can be neither an adjective nor a prepositional phrase, but, it seems that that situation changes for linking verbs. He was upstairs. "Upstairs" ...
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2answers
253 views

Prepositional phrase after the verb “was"

What is the role of the prepositional phrase with his friend in the sentence below: He was with his friend when I saw him today. Does it function as an adverbial or complement?
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30 views

How scared are you of snakes?

Do you think that it is grammatically correct to ask questions by leaving adjective complements alone? How happy are you about the exam results? How disappointed were you with my last ...
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2answers
34 views

Difference between in/on a social network

What's the difference between in/on a social network? For example, "If two individuals are friends in/on a social network, they ...".
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2answers
569 views

This bed has not been slept in … ? “for a long time by anybody” vs “by anybody for a long time”

This bed has not been slept in for a long time by anybody. This bed has not been slept in by anybody for a long time. Which is grammatically correct? Or, is there a difference between the two ...
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1answer
57 views

“What should we do IN / FOR the rest of the day?” – can I omit the preposition entirely?

A very short question: is the following sentence correct? What should we do (...) the rest of the day? Could the sentence do without a preposition (in, for), or is one needed?
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1answer
1k views

Emphasize vs emphasize on [closed]

Are these sentences correct? Some schools emphasize physical education. Some schools emphasize on physical education. Some schools lay emphasis on physical education. Thanks.
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176 views

prepositional pattern with choice of prepositions (“to” vs. “for”)

Now I am learning about prepositional patterns, but I have questions about when to use proper prepositions. Here's question sentences I gave a book to John. I gave a book for John. He brought a ...
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1answer
84 views

Is a preposition missing/misplaced in this sentence from an NYT article?

I have read this sentence below several times, but can't be sure if the last clause is grammatical. Our reactions to these foods are often instructive about our own prejudices on how to eat and are ...
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0answers
2k views

I am following up as to

I spoke with an attorney on the phone yesterday and he said he would get back to me with regards a quote for the service I was requesting. I am writing a follow-up email to him today to see if he has ...
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0answers
225 views

Is this Sentence Correct? “I am accusing him because of the mistake”

I was interested in English since when I have started to understand English. Now when I'm learning "Prepositions", I've figured out that:- i) We have to use Accuse of as you can see in this ...
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1answer
101 views

Turn into, Change to or Become

Is this a correct statement? As the parameter increases, the distribution turns from right-skewed into left-skewed. Or should I use As the parameter increases, the distribution changes from ...
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1answer
176 views

Question on active and passive voice

WE can correct the below sentence by adding "was" before assigned verb A new textbook focused on recent advances in artificial intelligence assigned by our instructor. But why do we want to ...
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1answer
38 views

“Membership **to** physics-related entities”?

This is a question that cropped-up while John Doe was preparing the English version of his CV. He wanted to include a section wherein he was to list some of the physics societies to which he belongs. ...
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1answer
139 views

The use of preposition with time

Going off of this question: "This semester" or "In this semester"? Having read through the question, its answers, and the discussion in comments, I would like to get to the ...
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1answer
48 views

Is there a difference in meaning between these sentences using preposition “of”?

First sentence: Protection of privacy and personal information on the internet and social media Second sentence: Privacy and personal information protection on the internet and social media If ...
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2answers
122 views

Can a preposition modifies a prepositional phrase?

Unless an order from the Reading Nook's online store is paid for by the deadline indicated, the books cannot be shipped and the order will be canceled. Can a preposition modifies a prepositional ...
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1answer
69 views

How “in operation ” differs from “operating”

Do Not Open While Machine Is In Operation. Do Not Talk To Operator While Machine Is In Operation I found safety signs describing such sentences as described above. Is it possible to replace the ...
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3answers
3k views

Plane took off [from] the runway

What if a phrasal verb ends in the preposition needed to connect a noun? The plane took off the runway. (The plane was ON the runway, and therefore preposition OFF is preferred) The plane took ...
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1answer
313 views

“Day of month, morning” vs “Morning, day of month”

You know the date format in American English is different from British English. So I wonder if there is a pattern when referring to parts of the day and days within a month. Which sounds more natural? ...
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1answer
4k views

“at this scale” vs “on this scale”

When scale is used figuratively, which preposition is right: on or at? Example: On/at this inter-national scale, your bank is so small that it is virtually invisible. If large banks go bust, so ...
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1answer
73 views

When to use “up” and “down”

How do you determine when to say "drive down there/here", and "drive up there/here", or "I'm shooting down the street", as opposed to "shooting up the street". Or, "What the hell is going on up in ...
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How can I intuitively know that the “in” in “in 3 days” means “after”?

I learn from answers of this and this question that: "in 3 days" implies after 3 days or approximately after 3 days. It seems very counterintuitive, to a Chinese at least. How can I intuit that ...
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2answers
43 views

Can “in noncontact with” be used as an antonym of “in contact with”?

The magnet force keeps the objects in contact with each other. I am trying to rewrite the sentence above I created such that it has an opposite meaning. My examples are as follows: The magnet ...
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2answers
651 views

'Pass something on (to somebody)' - what does 'on' mean?

I'm not a native-speaker; sometimes prepositions (or adverbs) are tricky for non-native speakers. "Pass the book on to me when you've finished with it." In this sentence, I don't know what does 'on' ...
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1answer
63 views

For sentence of “She uses to her advantage” , why can a VT “use” accompany with a PP “to her advantage”?

The original sentence is "she has this apparent innocence which, I suspect, she uses to her advantage." (Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary, 4th). I understand that "she has this apparent ...
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2answers
45 views

My really old wonder: “defined by” v.s. “defined as”

I understand the following sentence: The rule was defined as ~~~~ by John. It can be shortened by omitting "as ~~~~" or "by John", like The rule was defined as ~~~~. The rule was defined ...
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141 views

“since late on the previous evening”

I read this sentence in a book: He has been unconscious since late on the previous Saturday evening. I am wondering about this construction. I thought it should be "since late the previous ...
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1answer
6k views

“Back to” vs “Back in”?

What is the difference between them when we use them in the following form: This, my picture, is back to 1990. This, my picture, is back in 1990.
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5k views

“A lawyer by training”?

New York Times A lawyer by training, he said he was shocked that the person who gave him the Conyers documents declined his offer to pay I didn’t understand what this prepositional phrase implies. ...
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3answers
8k views

“Floating in” vs. “Floating on”?

I found 100$ floating in the water Why is “in” placed instead of “on” the water. I thing they are on the surface of the water not in. What do you think?
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77k views

“On Sunday evening” or “In the Sunday evening”

Everyone knows we use “in” for these terms In the evening, In the morning, in the afternoon. And for days, we use the preposition “on”, on Saturday, on Monday, on Tuesday,...so on. With respect ...
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1answer
669 views

Difference between 'during', 'in' and 'of'

Incorrect: Whereas it had been possible to at least consider the draft proposal of the directors, none of the two options of the final bargaining round were acceptable because of the bulk of the ...
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1answer
1k views

Does an adverb go before or after a prepositional phrase?

For example: He spoke optimistically to the people. vs. He spoke to the people optimistically. vs. He optimistically spoke to the people. vs. Optimistically, he spoke to the people.
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1answer
1k views

all through the night / all over the night

Do these sentences imply on same meaning. Are they interchangeable ? It rained all through the night. It rained all over the night.
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3answers
422 views

Why is “with the telescope” correct?

The following question is from TOEFL _______ Hale Telescope, at the Palomar Observatory in southern California, scientists can photograph objects several billion light years away (A) The (B) ...
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4k views

Preposition ( made of vs made from ) [duplicate]

Fill in the right word. Bread is usually made ______ wheat. 1) of 2) from 3) with 4) by
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1answer
244 views

Rules for combining sentences

1)-Thank you very much for accepting my request for taking care of my home during my absence. 2)-Thank you very much for accepting my request taking care of my home during my absence. Or 3)-Thank ...
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39 views

Are these both prepositions?

During the height of the blizzard... Would during and of both be prepositions, if so what would be the prepositional phrase for the two prepositions?
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2answers
4k views

Be afraid of or be afraid to?

Would a pupil say: "I'm afraid of getting bad marks." or "I'm afraid to get bad marks."? What is the nuance introduced by OF and TO?
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1answer
69 views

Come/go in and out of [duplicate]

If someone keeps entering and exiting my bedroom, and I want him to stop. Should I say: don’t come in and out of my bedroom. Or don’t go in and out of my bedroom. Is this just a case of ...
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3answers
13k views

“On my own way vs. “in my own way”?

Which one is correct in or on own way? I usually help my closest friends on/in my own way.
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1answer
899 views

Unlike vs Not unlike

'Not unlike' sounds like 'double negative' for me, but it suppose to be right because it's on Oxford Dictionary a large house not unlike Mr Shah's (source) I want to use preposition 'unlike' in this ...
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1answer
192 views

Which sentence is grammatically or syntactically correct?

a. He is the specialist in chemistry at the podium. b. He is the specialist at the podium in chemistry. a. He is a contender with a shoulder injury for the Best Chef title. b. He is a contender for ...
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26 views

“Inside of” a state/country & “my life/the summer” (time period), and “One of the worst English”?

My friend recently said this and it just sounded wrong to me, but I don't know why: "Despite having grown up inside of Ohio, he's a guy who has one of the worst English I've ever met inside of my ...
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1answer
3k views

Strive on vs Strive in

When strive is used without a direct object, should I use strive on, or strive in? Example: I strive on getting success. VS I strive in getting success
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1answer
199 views

Can a preposition be used before “that”?

Can a preposition be used before "that"? For example: The house in that I live is nice or maybe: The house that I live in is nice I think which is correct in these cases but why? Could someone ...
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240 views

Which is correct : “on the table that you told me about” or “which you told on the table about”?

I got on the table the book that you told me about. I got the book that you told me about.was on the table. Here which sentence is correctly speaking in English conversation? My point is to ...

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