Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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4
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2answers
143 views

Can a preposition modifies a prepositional phrase?

Unless an order from the Reading Nook's online store is paid for by the deadline indicated, the books cannot be shipped and the order will be canceled. Can a preposition modifies a prepositional ...
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1answer
97 views

How “in operation ” differs from “operating”

Do Not Open While Machine Is In Operation. Do Not Talk To Operator While Machine Is In Operation I found safety signs describing such sentences as described above. Is it possible to replace the ...
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3answers
4k views

Plane took off [from] the runway

What if a phrasal verb ends in the preposition needed to connect a noun? The plane took off the runway. (The plane was ON the runway, and therefore preposition OFF is preferred) The plane took ...
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1answer
348 views

“Day of month, morning” vs “Morning, day of month”

You know the date format in American English is different from British English. So I wonder if there is a pattern when referring to parts of the day and days within a month. Which sounds more natural? ...
2
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1answer
5k views

“at this scale” vs “on this scale”

When scale is used figuratively, which preposition is right: on or at? Example: On/at this inter-national scale, your bank is so small that it is virtually invisible. If large banks go bust, so ...
2
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1answer
113 views

When to use “up” and “down”

How do you determine when to say "drive down there/here", and "drive up there/here", or "I'm shooting down the street", as opposed to "shooting up the street". Or, "What the hell is going on up in ...
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3answers
81 views

How can I intuitively know that the “in” in “in 3 days” means “after”?

I learn from answers of this and this question that: "in 3 days" implies after 3 days or approximately after 3 days. It seems very counterintuitive, to a Chinese at least. How can I intuit that ...
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2answers
45 views

Can “in noncontact with” be used as an antonym of “in contact with”?

The magnet force keeps the objects in contact with each other. I am trying to rewrite the sentence above I created such that it has an opposite meaning. My examples are as follows: The magnet ...
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2answers
1k views

'Pass something on (to somebody)' - what does 'on' mean?

I'm not a native-speaker; sometimes prepositions (or adverbs) are tricky for non-native speakers. "Pass the book on to me when you've finished with it." In this sentence, I don't know what does 'on' ...
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1answer
70 views

For sentence of “She uses to her advantage” , why can a VT “use” accompany with a PP “to her advantage”?

The original sentence is "she has this apparent innocence which, I suspect, she uses to her advantage." (Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary, 4th). I understand that "she has this apparent ...
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2answers
46 views

My really old wonder: “defined by” v.s. “defined as”

I understand the following sentence: The rule was defined as ~~~~ by John. It can be shortened by omitting "as ~~~~" or "by John", like The rule was defined as ~~~~. The rule was defined ...
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1answer
158 views

“since late on the previous evening”

I read this sentence in a book: He has been unconscious since late on the previous Saturday evening. I am wondering about this construction. I thought it should be "since late the previous ...
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1answer
8k views

“Back to” vs “Back in”?

What is the difference between them when we use them in the following form: This, my picture, is back to 1990. This, my picture, is back in 1990.
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2answers
5k views

“A lawyer by training”?

New York Times A lawyer by training, he said he was shocked that the person who gave him the Conyers documents declined his offer to pay I didn’t understand what this prepositional phrase implies. ...
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3answers
9k views

“Floating in” vs. “Floating on”?

I found 100$ floating in the water Why is “in” placed instead of “on” the water. I thing they are on the surface of the water not in. What do you think?
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2answers
91k views

“On Sunday evening” or “In the Sunday evening”

Everyone knows we use “in” for these terms In the evening, In the morning, in the afternoon. And for days, we use the preposition “on”, on Saturday, on Monday, on Tuesday,...so on. With respect ...
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1answer
698 views

Difference between 'during', 'in' and 'of'

Incorrect: Whereas it had been possible to at least consider the draft proposal of the directors, none of the two options of the final bargaining round were acceptable because of the bulk of the ...
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1answer
2k views

Does an adverb go before or after a prepositional phrase?

For example: He spoke optimistically to the people. vs. He spoke to the people optimistically. vs. He optimistically spoke to the people. vs. Optimistically, he spoke to the people.
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1answer
1k views

all through the night / all over the night

Do these sentences imply on same meaning. Are they interchangeable ? It rained all through the night. It rained all over the night.
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3answers
552 views

Why is “with the telescope” correct?

The following question is from TOEFL _______ Hale Telescope, at the Palomar Observatory in southern California, scientists can photograph objects several billion light years away (A) The (B) ...
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3answers
5k views

Preposition ( made of vs made from ) [duplicate]

Fill in the right word. Bread is usually made ______ wheat. 1) of 2) from 3) with 4) by
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1answer
244 views

Rules for combining sentences

1)-Thank you very much for accepting my request for taking care of my home during my absence. 2)-Thank you very much for accepting my request taking care of my home during my absence. Or 3)-Thank ...
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1answer
41 views

Are these both prepositions?

During the height of the blizzard... Would during and of both be prepositions, if so what would be the prepositional phrase for the two prepositions?
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2answers
4k views

Be afraid of or be afraid to?

Would a pupil say: "I'm afraid of getting bad marks." or "I'm afraid to get bad marks."? What is the nuance introduced by OF and TO?
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1answer
71 views

Come/go in and out of [duplicate]

If someone keeps entering and exiting my bedroom, and I want him to stop. Should I say: don’t come in and out of my bedroom. Or don’t go in and out of my bedroom. Is this just a case of ...
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3answers
15k views

“On my own way vs. “in my own way”?

Which one is correct in or on own way? I usually help my closest friends on/in my own way.
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1answer
1k views

Unlike vs Not unlike

'Not unlike' sounds like 'double negative' for me, but it suppose to be right because it's on Oxford Dictionary a large house not unlike Mr Shah's (source) I want to use preposition 'unlike' in this ...
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1answer
199 views

Which sentence is grammatically or syntactically correct?

a. He is the specialist in chemistry at the podium. b. He is the specialist at the podium in chemistry. a. He is a contender with a shoulder injury for the Best Chef title. b. He is a contender for ...
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1answer
28 views

“Inside of” a state/country & “my life/the summer” (time period), and “One of the worst English”?

My friend recently said this and it just sounded wrong to me, but I don't know why: "Despite having grown up inside of Ohio, he's a guy who has one of the worst English I've ever met inside of my ...
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1answer
3k views

Strive on vs Strive in

When strive is used without a direct object, should I use strive on, or strive in? Example: I strive on getting success. VS I strive in getting success
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1answer
289 views

Can a preposition be used before “that”?

Can a preposition be used before "that"? For example: The house in that I live is nice or maybe: The house that I live in is nice I think which is correct in these cases but why? Could someone ...
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1answer
353 views

Which is correct : “on the table that you told me about” or “which you told on the table about”?

I got on the table the book that you told me about. I got the book that you told me about.was on the table. Here which sentence is correctly speaking in English conversation? My point is to ...
4
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2answers
761 views

I sleep in middle. You sleep in outside. Mummy sleeps in inside

My son wanted to change the position with me. "I want to sleep here." He said. "It's Okay. Becareful not to fall out the bed. I sleep in middle. You sleep in outside. Mummy sleeps in inside." (...
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2answers
198 views

Do Prepositions Alter Meaning of a Subject?

Do prepositions alter the meaning of a subject in a way that changes what the verb's compliment is referring to? (Specifically infinitive phrase compliments) Examples: I work at my position in time ...
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3answers
803 views

Complement or Adv. Prepositional Phrase?

I'm having trouble identifying/breaking down the components of an example under Adverb Prepositional Phrases in McGraw-Hill's English and Grammar Usage book. Here's the example with the Adv. PP ...
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2answers
59 views

“On my father's belly is the best place to sleep.”make sense?

I want to know if the sentence On my father's belly is the best place to sleep makes sense. Can preposition phrase On my father's belly be subject in the sentence?
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3answers
816 views

Em Dashes as seperation of a preposition phrase

Can em dashes be used to separate prepositional phrases? So that phrase is only used as to modify the noun directly before it, and to the rest of the sentence is non-existent. Examples: Truth ...
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2answers
1k views

What does “of” + noun do in the beginning of the sentence as subject?

I am reading a book and it has a grammar structure that I've never seen: Of + noun as subject of sentence: Usually it should be noun + of + noun, The sentence's meaning does not really change when ...
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1answer
210 views

Life on board ship was not (such as/as?) I had expected it to be

Life on board ship was not (such as/as?) I had expected it to be. Which is better from as and such as to use in the above sentence ?
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1answer
421 views

I trust you will show forbearance [to/for] me a few minutes more so that I can finish this work

I trust you will show forbearance [to/for] me a few minutes more so that I can finish this work. Which is the correct preposition which is to be used with forbearance in the above sentence ? I looked ...
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2answers
4k views

He [Climbed / Climbed up] a tree

He [Climbed / Climbed up] a tree Does using climb or climb up in the above sentence makes any difference ? I think the only difference is while using the latter one one is specifying the direction i....
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1answer
179 views

He dared to [Go at/go to] the blast site

I don't remember having read a sentence using go at + place until today but today I came across this sentence He dared to go at the blast site so as to see his colleagues. Is it all right to use ...
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0answers
28 views

Prepositions + time

I was wondering if these five sentences share a common meaning: People get older with time. People get older over time. People get older in time. People get older across time. People get older ...
0
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1answer
148 views

position of prepositional phrase in a sentence

Flood destroyed car in Thailand. If I change this sentence into passive. Cars in Thailand were destroyed by flood. Cars were destroyed in Thailand by flood. Which one is suitable? I prefer ...
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2answers
1k views

prepositional-phrases in passive sentence

I have read we can use Prepositioal Phrases as both adjective phrase and adverb phrase. But how can we differ them from adjective or adverb when changing them into passive? For example, ...
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1answer
247 views

be expressed “a different way” or “in a different way”

Following is excerpted from the book "The Language of Food" by Dan Jurafsky(page 7). Status used to be expressed a different way. I am getting confused with this sentence. As far as know, an ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between 'pat him on the back' and 'pat his back'?

In the TV shows or something, I've come across that kind of sentences. And make me wonder. why won't say just 'I pat his back'. it's shorter than 'pat him on the back'. and what situation would ...
11
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1answer
4k views

Zero articles after “of”?

I learned that I always have to use an article before a countable noun with some exceptions. But I am not sure this is right time to omit the article The old model of traditional kiln A new ...
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1answer
136 views

“…Up ahead” what is it called when preposition followed by another?

I met a friend of mine at the crossroads up ahead. What is the meaning of this phrase? What is it grammatically called when a preposition followed by another?
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1answer
134 views

Prepositions at the beginning on a sentence

I want to ask a question about it. Why do we do it? Why do we use the prepositions at the beginning of a sentence? For example: Up came Gandalf on a very splendid white horse. Why is "up" ...

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