Questions tagged [prepositional-phrases]

A "preposition phrase" or "prepositional phrase" (PP) is a phrase headed by a preposition such as "at", "on", "across", or "before".

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2answers
642 views

I sleep in middle. You sleep in outside. Mummy sleeps in inside

My son wanted to change the position with me. "I want to sleep here." He said. "It's Okay. Becareful not to fall out the bed. I sleep in middle. You sleep in outside. Mummy sleeps in inside." (...
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Do Prepositions Alter Meaning of a Subject?

Do prepositions alter the meaning of a subject in a way that changes what the verb's compliment is referring to? (Specifically infinitive phrase compliments) Examples: I work at my position in time ...
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3answers
645 views

Complement or Adv. Prepositional Phrase?

I'm having trouble identifying/breaking down the components of an example under Adverb Prepositional Phrases in McGraw-Hill's English and Grammar Usage book. Here's the example with the Adv. PP ...
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59 views

“On my father's belly is the best place to sleep.”make sense?

I want to know if the sentence On my father's belly is the best place to sleep makes sense. Can preposition phrase On my father's belly be subject in the sentence?
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3answers
705 views

Em Dashes as seperation of a preposition phrase

Can em dashes be used to separate prepositional phrases? So that phrase is only used as to modify the noun directly before it, and to the rest of the sentence is non-existent. Examples: Truth ...
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1k views

What does “of” + noun do in the beginning of the sentence as subject?

I am reading a book and it has a grammar structure that I've never seen: Of + noun as subject of sentence: Usually it should be noun + of + noun, The sentence's meaning does not really change when ...
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1answer
173 views

Life on board ship was not (such as/as?) I had expected it to be

Life on board ship was not (such as/as?) I had expected it to be. Which is better from as and such as to use in the above sentence ?
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1answer
400 views

I trust you will show forbearance [to/for] me a few minutes more so that I can finish this work

I trust you will show forbearance [to/for] me a few minutes more so that I can finish this work. Which is the correct preposition which is to be used with forbearance in the above sentence ? I looked ...
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2answers
3k views

He [Climbed / Climbed up] a tree

He [Climbed / Climbed up] a tree Does using climb or climb up in the above sentence makes any difference ? I think the only difference is while using the latter one one is specifying the direction i....
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1answer
155 views

He dared to [Go at/go to] the blast site

I don't remember having read a sentence using go at + place until today but today I came across this sentence He dared to go at the blast site so as to see his colleagues. Is it all right to use ...
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27 views

Prepositions + time

I was wondering if these five sentences share a common meaning: People get older with time. People get older over time. People get older in time. People get older across time. People get older ...
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1answer
145 views

position of prepositional phrase in a sentence

Flood destroyed car in Thailand. If I change this sentence into passive. Cars in Thailand were destroyed by flood. Cars were destroyed in Thailand by flood. Which one is suitable? I prefer ...
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917 views

prepositional-phrases in passive sentence

I have read we can use Prepositioal Phrases as both adjective phrase and adverb phrase. But how can we differ them from adjective or adverb when changing them into passive? For example, ...
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1answer
176 views

be expressed “a different way” or “in a different way”

Following is excerpted from the book "The Language of Food" by Dan Jurafsky(page 7). Status used to be expressed a different way. I am getting confused with this sentence. As far as know, an ...
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3answers
1k views

What is the difference between 'pat him on the back' and 'pat his back'?

In the TV shows or something, I've come across that kind of sentences. And make me wonder. why won't say just 'I pat his back'. it's shorter than 'pat him on the back'. and what situation would ...
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3k views

Zero articles after “of”?

I learned that I always have to use an article before a countable noun with some exceptions. But I am not sure this is right time to omit the article The old model of traditional kiln A new ...
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1answer
110 views

“…Up ahead” what is it called when preposition followed by another?

I met a friend of mine at the crossroads up ahead. What is the meaning of this phrase? What is it grammatically called when a preposition followed by another?
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1answer
130 views

Prepositions at the beginning on a sentence

I want to ask a question about it. Why do we do it? Why do we use the prepositions at the beginning of a sentence? For example: Up came Gandalf on a very splendid white horse. Why is "up" ...
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1answer
2k views

I did it ( myself or by myself) [duplicate]

I found some sentences that in which by is not used. Such as: I did it myself . I will kill you myself . he cooks food himself. Why by isn't used with these sentences like: by ...
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1answer
71 views

What is the meaning of 'of + ~ing' in the following sentence?

What is the meaning of 'of + ~ing' in the following sentence, "The quickest way of contacting the police station is to use your cellphone." Does it mean "The quickest way that we contact the ...
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1answer
602 views

Usage of the prepositions 'on' and 'in' before the words 'next' and 'last'

According to this article, we shouldn't use any preposition before the words 'last', 'next', 'every', 'this' when we refer the expression to some time (next Friday...) but there are some cases I have ...
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1answer
4k views

What does “up through” mean in this sentence?

"educational robotics for students up through age 19" Does this mean from age 1-19? Does this mean 19 and onwards? Does this mean only for 19 year olds? Something similar posted elsewhere but it ...
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1answer
52 views

“After Nth” in series, is it N+1?

I am not sure if somebody already asked this question but I am wondering when I say: I made a hit (song) after 3 songs. or It wasn't interesting to me anymore after the third message Does it mean, ...
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1answer
50 views

Does this phrase at the beginning of the sentence need the comma?

In production, these files should already exist. I was trying to explain to a non-native English speaker that this sentence needed the comma after production, but when trying to explain the grammar ...
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3answers
1k views

What does the phrase “to within” mean?

While I was reading the book 'Introduction to Algorithms by CLRS', I came across the sentence: ...is equal to g(n) to within a constant factor. I've seen something about it in Merriam-Webster, ...
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1answer
214 views

Is my interpretation of a meaning of the phrase 'with my mind' supported by an original text?

I am reading Moore's Proof of an External World. It is an established truth that you have to read philosophical papers especially carefully and try, as much as it is possible, to recover just that ...
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1answer
88 views

“I cut it by hand” - what is “by hand”? (Grammatically)

I cut it by hand. Does it (vaguely) make sense to call it a transitive verb?
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583 views

Am I the only one who this has been happening to?

Which one is correct, I got confused: Am I the only one who this has been happening to? Am I the only one to who this has been happening to? Am I the only one to who this has been happening?
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720 views

What expression is correct (in your mind vs with your mind)?

Expressions: 1) They count with their mind instead of using PC (with their brain) 2) They count in their mind instead of using PC (with their brain) I surfed the internet to find some at least, ...
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3answers
3k views

“The Night of”: common phrase ? Or just “the night of <something>”?

I have been watching the television drama "The Night Of", and I am not sure how the title should be understood: I can't find another example of a phrase where the preposition "of" is used without a ...
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2answers
907 views

What's the difference between opposite and in front of?

What's the difference between opposite and in front of? the bank is opposite the mall the bank is in front of the mall
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1answer
177 views

What do you mean by “ordinary preposition”?

I can't specifically figure out the meaning of ordinary preposition, especially with "to". When does verb + ing come after to? And when to + bare infinitive?
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1answer
49 views

Can I use 'in' for defining time in the past?

I thought that 'in' shouldn't be used for defining time period in the past, instead 'after' or 'later' should be used Excerption from the book: In half an hour Lake called us again (past simple) ...
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1answer
503 views

Can I use a preposition 'in' for distance (I'll see you in 15 minutes/meters)?

From Oxford Dictionary's definition of "in (preposition)": 3. Expressing the length of time before a future event I'll see you in fifteen minutes Can I use the same description, but for the ...
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1answer
272 views

What is the grammar of the sentence “there are 100 cents to a dollar”?

What is the grammar of the above sentence? Is "to a dollar" a prepositional phrase? Does it function as an adverbial or adjectival phrase?
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1answer
3k views

'easy for you' vs 'easy to you' vs 'easy with you'?

As a foreign person, it's hard to understand exactly and use the proper preposition. I don't know whether following sentences are right. Also, I don't know the exact meaning of following sentences. ...
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1answer
65 views

Is it right preposition in the sentence?

sentence: The man has senseless ability to low temperature (he feels no discomfit when his body exposed to low temperature) question: Should I use 'to' or 'of' preposition in this sentence?
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81 views

Is this a misplaced modifier?

The mother took a few steps toward the family room, grabbing a long umbrella on her way. She was sure that if necessary, she could do some harm to an intruder with the pointy object. I copied this ...
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1answer
49 views

Use of to in the sentence- “to the unspeakable relief of the student …”

Why to is used here: tuberculosis,bad tonsils,sleeping sickness, poor digestion,various forms of mental and nervous difficulty have been brought to light by the doctor during the past few months,to ...
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2answers
44k views

“In front of” vs “at the front of”

What's the real difference between "in front of" and "at the front of"? Can I say "At the front of the house"?
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3answers
707 views

Am I using “in the background” correctly?

I want to say I am working on this problem in my free time and it won't affect my daily tasks. Is the following correct? I am working on this problem in the background.
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4answers
9k views

'Back in 2000' vs 'In 2000'

I'm familiar with preposition 'in' in terms of using past tense. E.g. to denote that something is hapenning during the year 2000, I can say: I joined the project in 2000 But in some authentic ...
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2answers
158 views

Question participle phrase “compared to”

"There was a 10% increase in inventory in first quarter of 2017, compared to the end of 2016." Is the participle phrase "compared...2016" functioned as an adjective to "there"?
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1answer
51 views

Can I ask this kind of question?

Question: Can I ask in this way: 1) He was happy to brother's marks in the diploma (He was happy because of brother's marks in the diploma) 2) He was happy to the weather. Means (He was happy ...
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to certain degree vs in certain degree [closed]

Link of the source where I found the phrase "in certain degree", but the only what I found on a dictionary is "to certain degree". Question: What is the difference between "to certain degree" ...
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2answers
131 views

“Problem with <person>” vs. “Problem of <person>”

The original sentence is below: The problem with my other half is that he has no ambition. If I use the word 'of' instead of 'with', how does the meaning of the sentence change? When should I use '...
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2answers
282 views

Prepositional complement (two - part question)

In grammar, a subject complement follows a copular and describes the subject of a clause. Although nouns, pronouns and noun phrases most frequently perform the function, prepositional phrases can also ...
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1answer
118 views

Why isn't “On the bottom of the MetroCard are three arrows” written “On the bottom of the MetroCard THERE are three arrows”?

Recently I found this sentence: On the bottom of the MetroCard are three arrows and little white letters that say "Insert this way/This side facing you." This sentence is correct, but I do not ...
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1answer
720 views

“Answer to the phone” and “Answer the phone”

If we want to use the verb answer, should we say: "answer to the phone" or "answer the phone"? How about other cases like answering (to) other things like someones question, query etc.
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1answer
559 views

Is it right to end the sentence with the preposition WITH, in the given example?

Killing people is not a crime you can commit and get away. Killing people is not a crime you can commit and get away with. Do both the sentences mean the same thing? Are both of them grammatically ...

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