Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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A strange usage of 'of'

The word “language-game” is used here to emphasize the fact that the speaking of language is part of an activity, or of a form of life. The right understanding of the construction 'the speaking of ...
Егор Галыкин's user avatar
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"The company receives millions of dollars in advertising revenue." — What specifically does "in" mean here?

britannica.com: (1) The company receives millions of dollars in advertising revenue. I can guess what, in (1), "in advertising revenue" means — it means "earning on advertising". ...
Loviii's user avatar
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Trying to find the ultimate rule as to when to use 'on' instead of 'in' for parts of the day

Note: by "parts of the day" I only mean: morning, afternoon, evening, and night. This question is only relevant to these four. Intro According to Cambridge dictionary: We use in with ...
Manar's user avatar
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To lie in/within somebody

I would like to know which of these sentences is correct/the most appropriate: the necessary resource lies within him. the necessary resource lies in him. The meaning I am looking for: I want to ...
Jib's user avatar
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How to use "income distribution" and "age distribution"

I have problem using prepositions with "distribution". Are all these options correct? Are "income distribution" and "age distribution" both countable? Maybe in the first ...
newbie forever's user avatar
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How to use "with + noun" to report data

0.4 million students studied abroad in 1970 in the US, with a subsequent considerable increase to 1.4 million in 1985 and a final drop to 0.8. I was taught by my teacher the above structure, and I ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
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Correct prepositions following "that" in comparison structures

US citizens spent the smallest portion on food among all countries, at 14%, which was about 9% smaller than that by the Japanese. I chose by here as in "...9% smaller than the portion spent by ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
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Is it correct to say "I signed my daughter up for first grade"?

In Oxford dictionary, we have this sign up (for something) ​to arrange to do a course of study by adding your name to the list of people doing it You can sign up online for language classes. Say, my ...
Tom's user avatar
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Would you say "I would like to express my worries ON/IN or ABOUT"?

I know ABOUT is way more common but could you also use: ON? I asked ChatGPT (sorry) this same question and it gave me the following answer: "I would like to express my worries on the current ...
Daniel Costa González's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Why is the preposition "into" used in "come into the upper right corner of the screen." instead of "on"?

This context comes from the movie "Fight Club" (1999). JACK: Tyler was a night person. While the rest of us were sleeping, he worked. He had one part-time job as a projectionist. A movie ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
2 votes
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When is it better to finish a sentence with a preposition? [duplicate]

I am currently in the process of learning English and I encountered some grammatical structure I am not completely comfortable with, so I would be interested to have more information about these. Here ...
Falcon's user avatar
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Should you say "mistake a deer as a horse" or "mistake a deer for a horse"?

That is to say, somebody saw a deer and thought it was a horse, as in the phrase "horse deer" in Japanese: 馬鹿, ばか to mean a fool or idiot: The complete usage is: It is "horse" vs &...
Stefanie Gauss's user avatar
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Preposition for involved and per cent

What is the correct option, please? He will be involved at 45 per cent of his workload. He will be involved with 45 per cent of his workload. He will be involved in 45 per cent of his workload.
Anna-Kat's user avatar
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The USA's spending on or in this category

As far as I know, we normally say "in a category" and "spending on something". Which of the following sentences is grammatical? The USA's spending on this category was significant....
an IELTS learner's user avatar
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Which preposition is correct here: "The bar graph illustrates budget distribution __[among or to]__ different categories in five organizations"?

The bar graph illustrates budget distribution [among or to] different categories in five organizations So in the OALD, it is shown that "distribution" often goes with "among somebody&...
Ken Adams's user avatar
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"Pictures of the drivers licences of your drivers" or "pictures of the drivers licences for your drivers"?

Could you please tell me which sentence below sounds more natural and grammatical? For us to be able to see what your insurance premium is going to look lile, we need pictures of the drivers licenses ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
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In/on/at a Facebook/Reddit/Stackexchange post/tweet

I'm pretty sure it should be "in a tweet" (perhaps because a tweet is short?). And perhaps also the same for a Facebook post? But for a long Reddit/Stack Exchange post (perhaps with many ...
user182601's user avatar
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4 answers
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“…performed every year "on" Horse Guards Parade”

How come it's "on Horse Guards Parade" instead of "at Horse Guards Parade" in the following phrase? Thank you! "Trooping the Colour is a ceremonial event performed every year ...
Maurice's user avatar
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"Mix it round." vs "Mix it."

Someone is showing how to make a cake. And after putting the ingredients into a bowl, there comes this sentence: Mix it round. Tweenies (see 8:05-8:10) I, a non-native English speaker, wouldn't ...
Yunus's user avatar
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What meaning does "for" have in the phrase "reputation for"?

examples with "reputation for" from oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) The company enjoys an international reputation for quality of design. (2) a politician with a reputation for honesty (...
Loviii's user avatar
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Why do you say "I arrived in" when you make it to a place?

As little sense it makes to me, I decided to just make peace using "I arrived in {city}", "I arrived at {place}" which to me makes it sound as if I were UPSed there. However, that'...
Vita's user avatar
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What does "radio on ahead" mean in this context?

This context comes from the video game "Bioshock". Atlas is someone who communicated with the person speaking informing them about my upcoming visit and trying to arrange help for me. "...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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1 answer
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Are both sentences correct: "What did you react?" | "What did you react to?"

Imagine you have a friend, who had allergic reaction to a food yesterday. And you want to ask what food they reacted to yesterday. Can you simply say? - What did you react yesterday? Or should you ...
Yunus's user avatar
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create challenges to do, in doing or for doing?

Are they all correct and idiomatic? The situation has created financial challenges for the school to retain qualified teachers. The situation has created financial challenges for the school for ...
newbie forever's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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"The beach was flat enough to play soccer on." or "The beach was flat enough to play soccer."

The beach was flat enough to play soccer on. This sentence is from my English grammar book. I understand why there is an "on" at the end of the sentence, but I still wonder if the sentence ...
kuwabara's user avatar
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He felt torn between/among his family and his friends

Among is used when we see a group of three or more people or things. Between is used when we see two or more people or things as separate individuals. Which preposition do we use if there is more than ...
hwkal's user avatar
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"I have no idea <of> what you're talking about." — By what rule can we take "of" away here?

my own examples: (1) No idea of what we will do occured to me. — I think it's correct. (2) No idea what we will do occured to me. — I think it's incorrect. That is, "of" is obligatory. ...
Loviii's user avatar
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Does "fostered out of a local tribe" mean the same thing as "fostered in a local tribe" here?

This context comes from the TV show "The Leftovers". The speakers are located in Australia. "One of Grace’s kids was fostered out of a local tribe. He loved boats. When his family found ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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1 answer
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Within a five-mile radius [of or from] my house?

As far as I know, "within a five-mile radius of my house" is correct. What about "within a five-mile radius from my house"? It sounds even more natural to me but I'm not really ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
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"How does this look ON the outside." OR "How does this look FROM the outside."?

A native english speaker says this, when she is showing what is inside her bag. She takes things out one by one, talks about each of them, put them on a table, etc. She says: "Do I look ...
Yunus's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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"Premise on" [which] vs. "Premise with" [which]

I'm talking to a friend. And I want to make my lack of self-confidence very clear, so I utter the following: “I don't know what the hell I'm doing” – that's the premise on which I start my every day. ...
stateMachine's user avatar
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1 answer
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Fell down [in/on] the runway

Which one is correct: The fashion model fell down in the runway, or on the runway?
Shahram's user avatar
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Can I substitute "by defeating/obtained after defeating" for "over" in the sentence "Their win over the first place team was unexpected."?

Their win over the first place team was unexpected. I want to put my own definition of "over" in the sentence. My definition is—"by defeating" or "obtained after defeating&...
Sam's user avatar
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1 vote
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Preposition choice for the noun word 'secret'

I run into this question. We have no secrets _____ each other. A. about B. between C. to D. from My first response is B (between). After deep thought, I think C and D are more suitable. The ...
dan's user avatar
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What's the difference between "for" &"by" in the sentence —"Can you do it for(by) tomorrow?"?

Can you do it for tomorrow? Vs Can you do it by tomorrow? Can you do it for tomorrow? —From Collins dictionary Why I should choose "for" in place of "by"??
Sam's user avatar
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What should be the straightforward definition of" with" in the sentence " I talked about the problem with my tutor."?

I talked about the problem with my tutor. I think it could mean "involving somebody as a participant".Am I correct?I want suggestions.Thanks
Sam's user avatar
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Results of/from the analysis

Which of the following sentences is correct, and why? When one is talking about the results of/from an analysis or study, are there instances where both are correct? Example I: Results from the ...
goshawk's user avatar
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1 answer
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Use of 'of' and 'none' in the following sentence

Cows are amongst the gentlest of animals; none shows more passionate tenderness towards their young. In this sentence, why there is 'of' after 'the gentlest' and the use of none is also confused me. ...
user28796's user avatar
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1 answer
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What's is the meaning of "to" in this context—"Trace to"? [closed]

Hev was traced "to" an address in Tacoma. I could not find any relevant definition for this.
Sam's user avatar
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1 answer
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What does "under" mean?

The following is from the novel Wonder written by R. J. Palacio There are countless people under words like "germline mosaicism." Countless babies who'll never be born. What does "...
Stephen's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can the preposition "with" be used to introduce the instrument of calling, talking, listening etc

When we bring in the modal auxiliary verbs or verb phrases to be used with "to call", "to talk", "to listen", "to watch" "to email" and the like, ...
Eugene's user avatar
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2 answers
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What difference is between playing with someone and playing someone?

Played myself in scrabble. I won! What is the difference between playing with someone and playing someone? What if someone is replaced with the speaker themselves? Is the sentence in the quote ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 answer
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Where am I taking this to?

Where are you going? Where are you from? In the first sentence, we don't need to use a preposition for Where (question word) but in the other sentences we need to use prepositions, why?
hwkal's user avatar
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20 votes
3 answers
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Why "having something UP one's sleeve," not "having something IN one's sleeve"?

I learned a new idiom: "having something up one's sleeve," which means to have secret plans or ideas. This idiom is from the practice of magicians hiding tricks or gimmicks IN the sleeve, ...
rei727's user avatar
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1 answer
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by doing that we managed to save a lot of money

Tom suggested that we cook our own food. That was a good idea. By doing that, we managed to save a lot of money. Is there any preposition that could replace 'by doing' in the above sentence? 'From', '...
azz's user avatar
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Any difference between "He was taken down there." AND "He was taken there."? [duplicate]

"Anyway, he got drunk and he was taken down there." ITV-This morning (see:5:08-5:15) "take someone to a place" is the usual structure in every day life. For instance "He took ...
Yunus's user avatar
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6 votes
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Isn't there a preposition ("to") missing after "IP addresses that devices are allocated"?

I was looking through the bregman-arie/devops-exercises repository on GitHub when I saw this question: What is APIPA? ...with this answer: APIPA is a set of IP addresses that devices are allocated ...
Andrey Voeyko's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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On page or at page

Open your book at page 80. Turn at page 80. Open your book to page 80. Turn to page 80. Which preposition is better. Can we use both prepositions with the same meaning, or there is difference?
Abid's user avatar
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Removing "that of" from "A more important subject than that of getting indoors"

This sentence is from "The Return of the Native Book II, Chapter 6" A more important subject than that of getting indoors now engrossed her Can I delete "that of", as in below? ...
Display name's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
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Correct grammar

Saying,"where is Valerie at?'is incorrect grammar. Ending a sentence with preposition is incorrect. But why? When asking the question where is something the sentence is usually ending with at and ...
V Veach's user avatar

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