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Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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1answer
14 views

on/in/with- which of these go best with the given idiom?

From being great at sports to knocking it right out the park with your academics, you've done really well. From being great at sports to knocking it right out the park on your academics, you've done ...
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0answers
21 views

Constituency tests — is a phrase like this a constituent?

When we have a sentence with a strange syntactic position, how do we know if a phrase is a constituent? For example, "The two shortest of the books" Is [of the books] a constituent? I tried ...
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0answers
12 views

At/on/in a high level

Which is the correct preposition in this context? Everything was at/on/in a high level. It should mean that 'everything was excellent with wonderful service'.
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3answers
35 views

which prep. should I use when I use the word “experience”?

I am writing a personal statement for university application. And I want to demonstrate that some experience let me be interested in this subject. These experiences are about work, internship and ...
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2answers
65 views

Is there any difference between the phrases “next month”, “in the next month” and “for the next month”?

Is there any difference in meaning between the phrases in the following sentences? I will work next month. I will work in the next month. I will work for the next month. If I am right, ...
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1answer
10 views

Why was “from” used in this sentence (“one must command from each what each can perform…”)?

This is from the Little Prince, and the king says as below: "One must command from each what each can perform," the king went on. "Authority is based first of all upon reason. If you command your ...
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2answers
54 views

“get a train from the station” or “get a train at the station”?

Which preposition do I have to use in the following sentence. You still can get a train to your destination at/from the station near the bank .
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2answers
28 views

preposition omission before “this time of day”

I love going out at this time of the day. I love going out this time of the day. Are both the sentences grammatically correct? Or does the omitting the preposition render the sentence ...
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1answer
18 views

Between and across

Do between children and across children in following sentence have different meanings? In addition, wide health inequalities persist between and across children in various sociodemographic groups in ...
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0answers
13 views

How to choose between prepositions “of” and “from”?

In a class context, and talking about the homework that is due for today, is it better for a student to say: "For today, we had to learn parts 1 and 2 OF the lesson", or "parts 1 and 2 FROM the lesson"...
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2answers
27 views

“Prior to the 1980s” does it include the 1980s or not?

High pollution was observed prior to the 1980s. Which period does 'Prior to the 1980s' refer to, 1)include, 2)partially include, 3)exclude the period of the 1980s?
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1answer
19 views

Would anyone explain to me the use of the preposition of time ‘to’?

Would someone explain to me the exact meaning of the following sentence: Tickets are available to the end of the month. Does it mean the tickets are available from the beginning until the end of ...
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5answers
78 views

Which preposition do I use after the verb “negotiate”

Do I have to use the preposition about or for after negotiate.For example: We will negotiate with the company about/for a better deal.
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1answer
16 views

Phrasal verbs with the verb PUT

Lately, I have been trying to figure out the difference between these two phrasal verbs when used with commercials To put something IN a commercial To put something ON a commercial And I ...
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1answer
22 views

Does this compound sentence act as the object of the preposition 'after'?

In the construction The decision to block Mr. Sondland from being interviewed was delivered at the last minute, after the ambassador had already flown to Washington from Europe, and lawmakers had ...
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2answers
24 views

Difference between “do good to” “do good for” and “do good by”

What is the difference between “do good to others”, “do good for others” and “do good by others”? They appear the same to my non-native ears. There must be subtle differences between them. I only ...
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1answer
42 views

I received this message [to/in] my inbox?

I received this message to my inbox? or I received this message in my inbox? I am having a difficult time deciding between these two. Which one is correct?
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2answers
43 views

Using the preposition “before” for a location

I have just arrived to my friend's house and he would like to know where I parked my automobile and asks me: A) Where did you park your car? B) I parked it before the post office. Would you ...
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0answers
38 views

Inform about or inform regarding

Which one is more appropriate while professional emailing: I have informed the referees about the letters or I have informed the referees regarding the letters.
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0answers
32 views

is it correct to say “Can my spouse be covered under my health insurance?”

In an email I want to ask about health insurance of my spouse by my company. What is the correct way to ask about it? Is it grammatically correct to say under my health insurance in the following ...
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0answers
38 views

“whom…from” vs “from whom…” - positions of interrogative pronoun and preposition

Are both following sentences correct? If so, which one is more usual? Whom did the attacks come from? From whom did the attacks come?
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1answer
68 views

“Have you spoken English recently” vs. “Have you spoken in English recently”

Do you speak a language or speak in a language when asking if someone has been practising it? For example, which of these is better: A: Have you spoken English recently? B: Have you spoken in ...
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1answer
26 views

Which is correct “used for words” or “used of words”?

I read a sentence in Word by Word by Kory Stamper which was: We must turn to the dictionary for answers to these questions. What does "vulgar" mean when used of words? I strongly believe that ...
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1answer
51 views

Difference between “to enter through”, “to enter from”, “to enter by”

Are all of the sentences below correct and usual? Do they mean the same? He entered the bedroom through the window. He entered the bedroom from the window. He entered the bedroom by the window.
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1answer
24 views

difference of vs difference in

Is there any difference between the following sentences? What is the difference in meaning between those words? What is the difference of meaning between those words?
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2answers
14 views

Meaning of ‘in’ in: They had a very fast car to get away in?

What is the meaning of ‘in’ in the sentence: They had a very fast car to get away in. I think if there was not ‘in’, the sentence is right too: They had a very fast car to get away. So, why ...
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1answer
16 views

in the banner OR in to the banner OR on the banner OR to the banner?

My sentence is: The text needs to be incorporated in the banner. I asked is it "in the banner" or "on the banner" and this created a lot of different opinions: The text needs to be incorporated ...
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1answer
31 views

Impact [of something] on/in verb+ing

The Guardian, a highly reputable newspaper, seems to use "on/in" interchangeable after "impact". Sentences 1 and 2 are mine, and I want to know if my reasoning for the usage of on/in after "impact" ...
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1answer
26 views

Difference between with and to

With and to are very important prepositions in the English language. I know the usage of both prepositions but some points I become stuck with when should I use which preposition. For example: He ...
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2answers
21 views

“victim to” and “victim of”

In Insider Secrets To Hydraulics there is two texts: When I inquired why the new pump hab been fitted, the maintenance manager advised me that the original pump hab been uneconomical to repair. I ...
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1answer
64 views

He is the best soccer player “on” his team. vs He is the best soccer player “in” his team

He is the best soccer player on his team. He is the best soccer player in his team Are both preposition correct? I learned that when we make superlative expresstion, we usually use preposition ...
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0answers
22 views

Is it “at” or “in” or “on” stack exchange? [duplicate]

Could someone tell me which is correct? is there an alternative? Thank you. You are at Stack exchange site. You are in Stack exchange site. You are on Stack exchange site. I checked ...
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2answers
30 views

Available to VS Available for?

Question is simple and straightforward. Which one to use when and why? The data is available for the public. (Why or why not correct) OR The data is available to the public. (Why or why not ...
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1answer
34 views

Contribution to/towards/for [closed]

According to OALD contribution to/towards is correct usage, but in the following sentence The country’s highest film honour, the Dadasaheb Phalke award, conferred for “outstanding contribution for ...
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1answer
16 views

what is the right preposition “bad points of/about”

What is the right preposition to use here? One of bad points of/about having children is being worry all the time. One of the main bad points of/about my hometown is pollution.
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1answer
30 views

“in” or “on” my second week?

Should I use in or on? Or are both okay? A: I’ll be here for six weeks and I’m already in my second week. B: I’ll be here for six weeks and I’m already on my second week.
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1answer
22 views

at/in/on the same day

I have a sentence like: We run the three programs __ the same day: Choices are: 1) at 2) in 3) on Which one is correct? You can suggest another better choice if any.
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1answer
29 views

How to use 'concern with' and 'concern for'

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? 'Liberals have a concern with individual liberty' Or, should it be 'liberals have a concern for individual liberty'? And, more generally, what is ...
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1answer
22 views

stay late vs stay until late

Are both "stay late" and "stay until late" correct and do both have the same meaning? I usually hear/read only the first one. Example: I am going to stay late in the office today. I am going to stay ...
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2answers
90 views

Why “Take something with [reflexive pronoun]” is incorrect?

People don't use bring/take/etc (If you know other similar verbs, please tell me) with reflexive pronouns. I heard that from one of my English teachers too. Why? As I know we need to use objective ...
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1answer
15 views

Difference between learn with/from my major

This summer, I sought to engage myself in experiences that I felt were relevant to what I have been learning with my art history major. https://www.southwestern.edu/live/news/13558-curating-the-...
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1answer
34 views

Of or At night?

Does that mean "at"? Are they interchangeable(of/at)? Is it possible to replace “of” with “at” here, or does it mean something else? On his bench in Madison Square Soapy moved uneasily. When wild ...
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1answer
21 views

Preposition “In”

Why is there no preposition(to) before the word "afraid" in this quote? Sometimes the fear won’t go away, so you’ll have to do it afraid.
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1answer
66 views

Importance to me or importance me

Which one is correct? I need a friend who will give importance to me. I need a friend who will importance me. I think the former is correct but the website “sentencechecker.com” says it'...
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1answer
26 views

Correct preposition - a view to

Is the sentence correct? Does it sound natural? The view from the room's window was to the garages. Thank you in advance!
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1answer
59 views

I suffered with my wife?

I referred to many dictionaries and found that the verb suffer is not followed by the preposition with I have found the following sentences. 1. I suffered from fever. 2. One has to suffer for ...
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1answer
71 views

Why, speaking of a colonoscopy, does it say “they put it up your bottom” and not “they put it up through your bottom”?

This is a piece of dialogue about a colonoscopy from the series "Outnumbered" s03e03: — Yes, but how does it get inside your insides? — Well, they put it up your bottom. Why not "they put it ...
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2answers
24 views

difference between “part” and “a part”

What is the difference between part and a part? What is the difference between these two sentences? He was a part of the team. He was part of the team. I heard that part means a member and a ...
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2answers
35 views

prepositions used with DISTANCE

Dears, pls advise the difference in usage of the following prepositions with DISTANCE. There is little info in grammar, I'd be glad even just to hear the ideas of native speakers as they feel it. (My ...
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1answer
23 views

Prepositions: to stay in or at a place during/on/for/in a holiday

I don't really know if there is a difference in the meaning of the sentences below. For me as a not native speaker it kind of expresses the same idea. Or maybe not? I stayed at/in a hotel for/...