Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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1answer
12 views

Interested in OR Interested with

I came across an English question yesterday on a website: The organisation ___________ to popularise Indian classical music among the youth which has lost ___________ with its cultural roots. A ...
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What is the antonym of “toward”?

I know the antonym of "to" is "from". He went to the station. He came from the station. I am searching for a preposition opposite in meaning to "toward", but I could ...
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2answers
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Do I need to use to after is?

I met such an sentence : "All i want is to mess around" And I was wondering why there is to ? this is the rule or so it should be in English .Just where to appears, and somewhere in such ...
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0answers
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sell for or at?

I'm wondering which preposition to use in the following: The table sells for/at 200 dollars. The table is offered for sale for/at 200 dollars.
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Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs?

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs? I think I’m asking that probably because some transitive verb phrases goes before prepositions.
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1answer
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“Call a number” or “call to a number”?

Could you tell me if I have to use to after call in the following context? With this cell phone plan you'll get 500 minutes of calling numbers other cell phone carriers. With this cell phone plan you'...
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0answers
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“Serve in an intelligence service” vs. “serve with an intelligence service”

Could you tell me if there is any difference between serve in an intelligence service and serve with an intelligence service. For example: We don't know much about Mike except that he served in an ...
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1answer
19 views

Am I using preposition correctly?

I'm preparing for IELTS by writing some essays and then correcting those using Grammarly. In the following sentence, "shopping malls would be even a better place to spend time at", the app ...
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1answer
32 views

passed or passed by

Beautiful indeed is the path through which he passed. Is this sentence complete? Or, should I end the sentence with a "by" next to passed? It does sound okay without "by" to me; ...
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0answers
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Isn't in a preposition of mention or space?

Immediate superiors were crucial in mediating the discipline by senior officers, and in the infliction of their own minor punishments. why use "IN" this sentence? (in mediating....., in ...
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1answer
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Contact the team about/with/on/regarding this issue

I understand there are always more than one way to say something but which preposition is correct in this sentence? Contact the team regarding/with/on/about this issue.
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2answers
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“I want to move here (in) San Pedro.”

I want to move here San Pedro. I want to move here in San Pedro. Which one is grammatically correct and why?
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“Get smart in something”, “get smart about something” or “get smart with something”?

Could you tell me which preposition I use after smart: in, about, or with when specifying something the person wants to be knowlegeable about. For example: I want to get smart in math. I want to get ...
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1answer
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Differences between “a X of a Y” and “the X of a Y”?

A car usually is equipped with four wheels. And below "wheel" doesn't mean a steering wheel. (1) a wheel of a car Does (1) implies there is more than one wheel? (2) the wheel of a car ...
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Can I use “box of chocolates” and “chocolate box” interchangeably?

The same with "list of cities" vs "city list", or "list of users" vs "user list", etc.
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1answer
21 views

Set up automatic payments for my debit card, with my debit card or on debit card?

Could you tell which preposition do I use in the sentence below: for, with or on? I'd like to set up automatic payments for/with/on my debit card.
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1answer
26 views

The body in/on his windshield

He got out of the car. Looked up at the building, then at the body in/on his windshield. If the body is lying outside his windshield, should it be in or on?
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1answer
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Is it correct and natural to say “be at one's training ” meaning to at a places where one's training takes place?

Could you tell me if it is correct and natural to say be at a training session meaning to at a places where one's training takes place? For example: I can't talk at the moment because I'm at my ...
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“Below certain years” or “Under certain years”

Which preposition is appropriate for the following case, "below certain years" or "under certain years"? This person has 2 children below / under 2 years. I saw both in use and I'...
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What should I use, “with hindsight or in hindsight, I should never have gone there”?

What should I use? With hindsight or in hindsight, I should have never gone there
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1answer
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Why is it “wrinkled his nose in disgust AT the smell” instead of “in disgust OF the smell”?

I came across this sentence: He wrinkled his nose in disgust at the smell. I wonder why not: He wrinkled his nose in disgust of the smell. Does it make any difference why we don't use of?
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How many of such OR how many such

Which one is correct? 1 How many such people do you know? 2 How many of such people do you know? I have come across both versions. I still don't know which one is correct.
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1answer
24 views

Which one is correct: “in your phone number” or “on your phone number”?

Could you tell me which preposition I use before your phone number in the sentence below? Abnormal activity has been registered in/on my phone number, which is why it's suspended. If neither is ...
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1answer
23 views

Preposition “by”: used to show the degree or amount of something

I composed this sentence with meaning of by as shown above. I need you to pull shipping date in early by any day. What I am conveying by this sentence is...; I need you to ship the goods earlier ...
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What is the difference between “over a year since…” and “over a year on since…”?

Could you tell what the difference is between over a year since and over a year on since? For example: Over a year since the first outbreak of the disease, we have to take stoke of what we've learned ...
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1answer
40 views

What part of speech is up in the sentence, the time is up

This sentence, the time is up, is confusing me. I think up is a preposition
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Is “a preview to such work” correct?

I know that "of" is the most commonly used preposition after "preview." Still, I am writing a sentence where it does not feel right: "X published such text as a preview of Y's ...
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'Bring [someone] on board [preposition?] [some project/plan]'

Should I use a preposition after using the expression 'bring someone on board'? Like Paul made a powerful pitch, but he brought only a handful of colleagues on board [?] his eccentric plan.
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2answers
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“By the river” vs “at the river.” [duplicate]

Which one is more common? Example sentence: The firework festival was held at/by the river. Or are they equally correct?
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2answers
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To file something with something (party)?

When you say You file your income tax return with ABC, What does the "with" mean? Against ABC or through ABC?
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15 views

Correct use of preposition before 'contempt'

Is it correct to say: They looked at us with contempt? Or should we say: They looked at us in contempt?
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42 views

Prepositions of time ranges including or excluding the endpoints of the range

I came across a non-authoritative source (no link to source possible) that stated the following for time ranges: between-and, excludes both endpoints, e.g., between May and July - meaning: June from-...
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23 views

Leave tomorrow or leave for tomorrow

I need a break tomorrow. What should I say to my boss? Sir, I need a leave tomorrow. Sir, I need a leave for tomorrow. Please help me out.
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1answer
15 views

Follow the path of sb

Can I use the expression "follow the path" + of with a person? e.g. Follow the path of the old master. Or would it sound better: Walk the path of the old master? It should be the title of an ...
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23 views

“On the order” vs “of the order”

When we are trying to indicate the date or order quantity, do we use "on" an order or "of" an order? Change the date on/of an order Update the order quantity on/of an order Since ...
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1answer
31 views

“professor in Houston University”

Should "the" be added in front of "Houston University" in the following sentence? ("the Houston University" sounds not as natural as simply "Houston University" ...
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Is 'respond them' grammatically correct?

Should it be 'respond them' or does it have to be 'respond to them'? I mostly hear people say 'respond to' but there's a part in my textbook with the phrase 'responding them'. I'm non-native so I'm ...
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2answers
23 views

To lie low from someone or something

Do we say 'He should lie low from the public or social media until the scandalous case has been resolved'? Would 'stay away from' is the better option?
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In which cases are “to” and “for” intercalables?

Are there contexts where I can use "to" and "for" without any loss of meaning? If so, give us some examples of them.
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1answer
22 views

Is the word “by” being used as a preposition or adverb in “Sort by extension”?

In the short sentence "Sort by extension.", is the word "by" being used as a preposition or an adverb? When I look it up in an English dictionary, one of the examples inclines me ...
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1answer
33 views

Unleashing dogs into the crows or onto or on?

Unleashing dogs into the crows or onto or on? Are all of these grammatical? I think I see on most often, and then onto and sometimes into, but I think into is not grammatical. Am I correct?
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1answer
28 views

Ran out to/on the balcony

"Ran out to the balcony" "Ran out on the balcony" I did a search on Google and the one with "to" had three times as much hits than the one with "on", which ...
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1answer
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(A reading material) will be released “through/via vs. on” the website

In my mother tongue, through/via X also has a meaning of "something conveyed by means of X" as well as "something piercing X", so we're constantly tempted to express a similar ...
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131 views

Does the word 'afternoon' need a preposition before, in the following context?

Does the word 'afternoon' need a preposition before, in the following context? He reads books afternoon, usually. Or it should be with 'in the': He reads books in the afternoon, usually.
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1answer
25 views

Correct usage of “promise” as a noun

I can't give you any promise that your late response will be acknowledged. Again, I can't give you any promise [for/about/on] that. Is any of the above cases correct? I'm particularly asking about ...
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1answer
26 views

Which preposition should I use: “from”, “out of” or “out from”?

Which of the following is the best choice if I want to say that we must facilitate information flow within the company at the same time as we must not let parties outside the company get hold of any ...
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3answers
185 views

Ending question with “of”

I know that ending sentences with prepositions should be avoided, but still. Can I ask so:"What is the aileron part of?"
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Correct use of the “in” and “on” preposition

Consider the two sentence : The library is in the north side of the quad. The library is on the north side of the quad. The number 1. above is incorrect as I ran an automated grammar check. Here ...
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1answer
25 views

Use of preposition in in question a sentence

Which of the following sentences are correct regarding to know the preference about car. What is your preference to car? OR What is your preference on car? Please let me know the meaning of both ...
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1answer
38 views

Conform with or conform to

Is there any difference in meaning of conform with and conform to? Cambridge Dictionary does not seem to make any difference and gives both prepositions with "conform" Before buying the ...

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