Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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two "in"s in a row

There is only one blank to fill in in that sentence. There is only one black to fill in that sentence. Grammatically speaking, both "in"s are needed, because of "fill in the blank"...
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Do you write posts "on", "for", or "in" social media groups?

Do you write posts "on", "for", or "in" social media groups? For example, you could set up a rock band and publish updates on your Facebook page about your new albums and ...
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"In hope, John". Is it ok to sign letters this way?

Avaaz, a non-profit that unites environmental and social activists, signs its emails with "in fierce hope and determination". Can I sign my letters with "in hope" too (without the ...
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Did I use "for" and "in terms of" well

"Books are getting less important FOR knowledge, and they are also less relevant IN TERMS OF recreation" 1.) Were 'for' and 'in terms of' used grammatically here? 2.) I feel this statement ...
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In the expression "Elevator up" is "up" a preposition or an adverb?

I know that in this example: is your house up or down the avenue? "up" is a preposition. But is it the same in "elevator up"? it looks different
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is "capturing moments for social media" correct?

I wrote: ...a considerable part of Americans admitted that they put the goal of capturing moments for social media before living the moments themselves. is this correct or should I use "on"...
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2 answers
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where vs at where

I'm not sure if a preposition is needed. A new roundabout will be added where/at where the south road meets the main road currently in a T-intersection.
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presents to the best actor trophy

Is the boldfaced preposition used correctly in the following? It seems out of place. Typically, the previous year's best actor winner presents the current year's best actress award (and the reigning ...
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'Obsessiveness about' or 'obsessiveness with'

I was wondering whether A or B are grammatically correct: A: obsessiveness about B: obsessiveness with or maybe even a completely different preposition is necessary here? Thanks!
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"According to" Vs. "In according with" [closed]

When to use "According to" and when to use "in according with"? Many times I find myself thinking about what the correct choice is. For example, I've written a message to a ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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"to pull all of the data" vs "to pull all the data"

I have these two phrases: "to pull all of the data" and "to pull all the data". The second phrase seems a bit off, but it's used a lot in technical writing, so I guess I'm missing ...
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Outside town/outside the town/outside of town/outside of the town

He is outside town He is outside the town He is outside of town He is outside of the town I think that the last two are wrong. The first two are correct. Is there a difference between the first two ...
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to have confidence in sb

If the people in inferior positions do not have confidence in those above them, government of the people is an impossibility. I am logically weak, I wonder if this line suggests that the people in ...
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In preposition usage

Please help me understanding the usage of in Four in ten are employed full-time. {Does this mean 4 are working full-time and other 6 part-time} ​​​​ In indicates the style or composition of recorded ...
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1 answer
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during an interview vs. at an interview?

I am always baffled by the choices of prepositions. When I write something like We should focus our learning on what questions are asked during an interview/at an interview I wonder should I use &...
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1 vote
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Which preposition do I use with a URL?

Which of the following is correct: You will find more information on [URL] You will find more information at [URL] I have tried googling, using various actual URLs, but I'm not getting any useful ...
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1 answer
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Is " of him" or " for him " followed by the infinitive?

It's hard for you to make such a decision. It's very kind of you to see me off. Either of the above sentences works well. Here arises a question about how to use the prepositional phrase preceding ...
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Whether to use a preposition in this sentence construction

Context: It is animals and plants which lived in or near water whose remains are most likely to be preserved. ... The remains of plants and animals that lived on land are much more rarely preserved, ...
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2 answers
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over/in the past/last years

Can we change "in" to "over" (and the other way around), and "last" to "past" (and the other way around) without changing the meaning at all in this particular ...
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1 answer
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throw something at/to someone

Which preposition is likely in the following? PARIS (AP) — A man seemingly disguised as an old woman in a wheelchair threw a piece of cake at the glass protecting the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum ...
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2 answers
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Who did you say that to? [closed]

Are both correct? Do they mean the same? Who did you tell (about) that? Who did you say that to?
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Which is correct, "pass" or "pass by": If you ________ a supermarket, could you get me some milk?

Which is correct, pass or pass by? or both? If you ________ a supermarket, could you get me some milk? A. pass B. pass by
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Leave it to him vs. leave it for him

I left a piece of cake for him. I left a piece of cake to him. Is there any difference? My dictionary says to is used when you die and have something to give to others.
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-1 votes
1 answer
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"Go doing something *to* somewhere"?

Can I say "go doing something to somewhere"? For example, can I say He will go camping with you to the Porcupine Mountains. With "to" I want to imply that they are going ...
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It can be controlled from the software

I see a sentence on a user manual like "It can be controlled from the software". They have obviously meant that "you can control it by using the software". Is that correct grammar? ...
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1 answer
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launch ... to/into space

Normally, I expect the verb "launch" to go with "into space." But I saw the following: Three rookie astronauts aboard SpaceX’s Crew-3 mission for NASA just launched to space for ...
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What are we in for today?

"Let go," said Annie. Jack pulled on his pack and followed her. What are we in for today? he wondered. Does " what are we in for today" mean "how are we today"? Why are ...
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2 answers
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"I haven't received the confirmation letter via/by/from email"

I was booking a trip and I was supposed to get an email that confirms my booking but I didn't get it so I was asking a customer service representative about the reason. I was wondering which ...
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Double "in", is it natural? [duplicate]

I made up a sentence: She sold the house that she lived in in her childhood Obviously, these 2 "in" relate to different words in the sentence, but is it natural and idiomatic? I've heard ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
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I'll be gone IN or ON the train?

Obviously we say ''I am on the train'' but if there's ''I'll be gone...'' in the sentence does it affect the grammar in any way? Is it ''I'll be gone IN or ON the train?''
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Which preposition to use when talking about the speed of processing a document?

Talking about a software that processes documents, do I say "Thanks to its completely different architecture, on a typical document, it is about ten times faster." or "Thanks to its ...
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7 votes
3 answers
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Understanding "of" use in "all I could think of was"

As I drove to the police station, I tried to control alternating bouts of numbness and hysteria. Pacing the reception area, all I could think of was that he was only a few meters away from me, and ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is it correct to use the preposition "of" in "the possibility of correcting the flatness of"?

Is it correct to use of preposition "of" in my sentence? The metallic transport skeleton has the possibility of correcting the flatness of the working surface according to the slope of the ...
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Read in / read on

Which of the two prepositions is the correct one when you are reading a magazine? I am writing in reference to the advertisement I read in / on the "London Globe" (magazine).
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ON. / IN the street - meaning (example) [duplicate]

As far as I know: He was living on the street. = he was a homeless He was dancing on the street like a maniac. = he was dancing on the pavement If it is correct, how would "in" instead of &...
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2 answers
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Is the use of preposition "with" being correctly used in this context?

The headline is: "Eva Mireles’s husband was an officer with the school district’s Police Department. He was not allowed to enter the place where his wife was under attack." What caught my ...
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I have been to London BUT I have been on a plane/ in a cave

There are several threads about which prepositions one can use after "have/has been" (present perfect simple). I understand that "been" can be the past participle of "be" ...
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How to use "gone on holiday" [duplicate]

Should I say "I have never gone on holiday in the USA" or "I have never been on holiday in the USA". Besides, shouldn't preposition TO be used instead of IN, as the USA is ...
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after a period + an event (After 10 days after purchase)

I purchased a fan. After 10 days, it makes noise. Can I rephrase the sentence to the following? My fan quickly makes noise after 10 days after purchase. The "after ... after" part seems ...
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0 votes
2 answers
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By road or on road

She always travels by road. Is it correct to use the preposition by here because we use by normally with the means of transportation like She always travels by bus.?
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He emptied his pockets of loose change. (meaning of 'of')

He emptied his pockets of loose change. My native language which is not English wants to rewrite the sentence as this: He got rid of loose change from his pockets. Or, He emptied his pockets (from ...
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What is the best one to be used? Today is Sunday or It's Sunday today.?

What is the best one to be used? What ones are 100% correct? Today is Sunday or It's Sunday today? Is that correct too -> "Today it's Sunday"? And one more question, What about these: &...
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0 votes
1 answer
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The seemingly unnecessary “out” in phrasal verbs

The preposition part of some phrasal verbs seem to add no additional meaning to the verb. Take as an example “out” in the following phrasal verbs; Write out, Miss out, Test out, List out, Type out, ...
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1 answer
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He was arrested ________ a charge of murder

This question came in the Dhaka University admission test 2008-09 Q) He was arrested ________ a charge of murder. (a) on (b) for (c) with (d) about Question bank says that the answer is (b). I think ...
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0 answers
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not that good (of) a person [duplicate]

Example sentence: I'm not that good (of) a person. I just did it for the money. Should that of be there? Note: Google Ngrams says that that good a of person is more common than that good of a person....
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What does “ for” imply here?

When we leave to a place basically we say, "I am leaving to America tonight", or "I am leaving for America tonight" (not sure if this sentence is used) What I personally think is ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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The university bestowed an honorary degree on her (vs. to her)

The university bestowed an honorary degree on her. (O) The university bestowed an honorary degree to her. (X) If 'to' is not used, why it is not used? When you use 'on' instead of 'for/to' as in the ...
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0 votes
3 answers
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Because of discrimination _________ women, she was required to work as a nurse rather than a doctor [closed]

This question came in the Dhaka University admission exam 2014-15 Q) Because of discrimination _________ women, she was required to work as a nurse rather than a doctor. (a) for (b) of (c) against (d)...
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0 answers
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The university will build a new dormitory ____________ campus

This question came in the Dhaka University admission exam 2015-16 Q) The university will build a new dormitory ____________ campus (a) in (b) on (c) over (d) at I think that the answer is (b), but the ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

Most metals expand and contract__________ variations___________ temperature

This question came in the Dhaka University admission exam 2015-16 Q) Most metals expand and contract__________ variations___________ temperature (a) with, in (b) from, of (c) by, of (d) to, from ...
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