Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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-1 votes
2 answers
38 views

Differences between "a X of a Y" and "the X of a Y"?

A car usually is equipped with four wheels. And below "wheel" doesn't mean a steering wheel. (1) a wheel of a car Does (1) implies there is more than one wheel? (2) the wheel of a car ...
14 votes
6 answers
3k views

Is "spaced by 1 meter" correct English?

Suppose that the distance between A and B is 1m, is it correct and natural to say A and B are spaced by 1 meter
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

Preposition in "as there was no bus to travel BY/ON so I decided to ..."

As there was no bus to travel by/on so I decided to book a cab Here bus refers to a means of transport if I am thinking right. But the answer given is "on"
0 votes
1 answer
84 views

What is the the meaning of "…in what is delivered and implemented…"

I'm translating a book into Persian. Please help me understand the meaning of "in what is..." in bold below. But within the equivalence of equality there is a recognizable difference in what is ...
0 votes
4 answers
73 views

The position of the conjunctions and adverbials

I have some location problems with sentences that have more than one prepositional phrase or conjunction. Examples, I decided to come there yesterday. What does it mean? I decided it yesterday or I ...
-1 votes
0 answers
15 views

Did I use "for" and "in terms of" well

"Books are getting less important FOR knowledge, and they are also less relevant IN TERMS OF recreation" 1.) Were 'for' and 'in terms of' used grammatically here? 2.) I feel this statement ...
1 vote
1 answer
66 views

A construction "of the" and the usage of "take a rest" + articles

1)"This place is an opportunity to take a rest in THE uniqueness OF THE local nature where you can feel Russian hospitality." 2)"You will have an opportunity to take a rest in the uniqueness of the ...
0 votes
1 answer
23 views

In the expression "Elevator up" is "up" a preposition or an adverb?

I know that in this example: is your house up or down the avenue? "up" is a preposition. But is it the same in "elevator up"? it looks different
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Language bindings "to" or "for" (computing)?

In computing, one can write bindings from one language to another, e.g. LISP bindings to OpenGL, or a collection of bindings for C. I seem to find both prepositions to and for used indiscriminately, ...
-1 votes
1 answer
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is "capturing moments for social media" correct?

I wrote: ...a considerable part of Americans admitted that they put the goal of capturing moments for social media before living the moments themselves. is this correct or should I use "on"...
2 votes
2 answers
28 views

where vs at where

I'm not sure if a preposition is needed. A new roundabout will be added where/at where the south road meets the main road currently in a T-intersection.
0 votes
1 answer
18 views

'Obsessiveness about' or 'obsessiveness with'

I was wondering whether A or B are grammatically correct: A: obsessiveness about B: obsessiveness with or maybe even a completely different preposition is necessary here? Thanks!
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

presents to the best actor trophy

Is the boldfaced preposition used correctly in the following? It seems out of place. Typically, the previous year's best actor winner presents the current year's best actress award (and the reigning ...
-2 votes
0 answers
23 views

"According to" Vs. "In according with" [closed]

When to use "According to" and when to use "in according with"? Many times I find myself thinking about what the correct choice is. For example, I've written a message to a ...
0 votes
3 answers
13k views

Should I use "previous experience in" or "previous experience of"?

I've been looking everywhere to see what's the right approach, and I can't find anything in english.stackexchange.com or other sites. I have the following sentence: Our customers love this feature,...
1 vote
3 answers
64 views

Internship in this role

I'm interested in applying for an internship on a specific role and I'm trying to figure out the correct for of the following phrases: there are some open roles for? "job title" I want to apply for ...
-1 votes
1 answer
32 views

"to pull all of the data" vs "to pull all the data"

I have these two phrases: "to pull all of the data" and "to pull all the data". The second phrase seems a bit off, but it's used a lot in technical writing, so I guess I'm missing ...
-1 votes
2 answers
34 views

imposed new travel restrictions from several African countries

Is "from" properly used in the following sentence from CNN? At least 70 countries, among them the United States, imposed new travel restrictions from several African countries after Omicron ...
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Outside town/outside the town/outside of town/outside of the town

He is outside town He is outside the town He is outside of town He is outside of the town I think that the last two are wrong. The first two are correct. Is there a difference between the first two ...
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

What did you give him money in exchange for?

I would like to learn if these kinds of questions are possible and correct in English. I think they are but I'm not sure. What did you give him the money in exchange for? In exchange for what did ...
0 votes
1 answer
224 views

"He was introduced (to) essay structure."

I introduced essay structure to him Which passive sentence is correct and why? He was introduced to essay structure. He was introduced essay structure.
0 votes
1 answer
52 views

Is it okay to say "She is in a red bracelet, a silver necklace, sun glasses and golden earrings" and "to put the key in the keychain"?

We often say "She's in a baseball cap and red shoes". Similarly, can we say "She is in a red bracelet, a silver necklace, sun glasses and golden earrings"? This is a picture of a keychain and a key ...
1 vote
1 answer
66 views

Is “since five years old” grammatical?

I’ve lived here since I was five years old. I know that since is used as a conjunction here. Can I use since as a preposition and leave out “I was”? I’ve lived here since five years old.
-2 votes
1 answer
32 views

to have confidence in sb

If the people in inferior positions do not have confidence in those above them, government of the people is an impossibility. I am logically weak, I wonder if this line suggests that the people in ...
0 votes
2 answers
52 views

Do I use 'of' or 'by' in connection with artist's work?

I often write about works of art and am unsure if I'm doing it correctly. What I am trying to express is that if you go to this exhibition you will see artworks by certain artists. Is this correct: ...
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Either in or under

In the following sentence is the usage of in incorrect? One of the most important uses of drones in the Indian context, however, is their use for settlement of compensation in crop insurance ...
0 votes
1 answer
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In preposition usage

Please help me understanding the usage of in Four in ten are employed full-time. {Does this mean 4 are working full-time and other 6 part-time} ​​​​ In indicates the style or composition of recorded ...
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

"Bringing ambition in/to life."

What is difference between below mentioned sentences. Bringing ambition in life. Bringing ambition to life.
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1 answer
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during an interview vs. at an interview?

I am always baffled by the choices of prepositions. When I write something like We should focus our learning on what questions are asked during an interview/at an interview I wonder should I use &...
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

“Without entering the parameter, the system will not send data information to the user's email - this sounds weird?

I want to say, "If the user does not enter the parameter, the system will not send data information to the user's email." But I want to use the word "without". I think Example 3 ...
0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Whether to use a preposition in this sentence construction

Context: It is animals and plants which lived in or near water whose remains are most likely to be preserved. ... The remains of plants and animals that lived on land are much more rarely preserved, ...
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Which preposition do I use with a URL?

Which of the following is correct: You will find more information on [URL] You will find more information at [URL] I have tried googling, using various actual URLs, but I'm not getting any useful ...
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Is " of him" or " for him " followed by the infinitive?

It's hard for you to make such a decision. It's very kind of you to see me off. Either of the above sentences works well. Here arises a question about how to use the prepositional phrase preceding ...
-4 votes
2 answers
42 views

Who did you say that to? [closed]

Are both correct? Do they mean the same? Who did you tell (about) that? Who did you say that to?
-1 votes
2 answers
21 views

over/in the past/last years

Can we change "in" to "over" (and the other way around), and "last" to "past" (and the other way around) without changing the meaning at all in this particular ...
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

throw something at/to someone

Which preposition is likely in the following? PARIS (AP) — A man seemingly disguised as an old woman in a wheelchair threw a piece of cake at the glass protecting the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum ...
-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

An article about her at New York Times vs alternatives

An article about her at New York Times An article about her on New York Times An article about her at newyorktimes.com An article about her on newyorktimes.com I suspect that the first and the fourth ...
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

What is the meaning of "of"?

abdominous : [archaic] (of a person) having a large belly, fat. What is the meaning of "of"?
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

"Next week" vs. "in the next few days"

According to grammar that we don't put any preposition before next week, year, month etc. but in one of the Outcome books I found this sentence: Passengers who are flying IN the next few days should ...
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Which is correct, "pass" or "pass by": If you ________ a supermarket, could you get me some milk?

Which is correct, pass or pass by? or both? If you ________ a supermarket, could you get me some milk? A. pass B. pass by
-2 votes
0 answers
18 views

Leave it to him vs. leave it for him

I left a piece of cake for him. I left a piece of cake to him. Is there any difference? My dictionary says to is used when you die and have something to give to others.
-1 votes
2 answers
94 views

Not by somebody VS by not somebody

Which variant is correct? She is being thought about by not him. She is being thought about not by him.
-1 votes
1 answer
31 views

Most metals expand and contract__________ variations___________ temperature

This question came in the Dhaka University admission exam 2015-16 Q) Most metals expand and contract__________ variations___________ temperature (a) with, in (b) from, of (c) by, of (d) to, from ...
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

It can be controlled from the software

I see a sentence on a user manual like "It can be controlled from the software". They have obviously meant that "you can control it by using the software". Is that correct grammar? ...
-1 votes
1 answer
25 views

"Go doing something *to* somewhere"?

Can I say "go doing something to somewhere"? For example, can I say He will go camping with you to the Porcupine Mountains. With "to" I want to imply that they are going ...
0 votes
1 answer
4k views

Times of the day - usage

I have a problem concerning times of the day in English. Am I doing it right? I’m particularly interested in the bolded ones (midnight/noon/midday). Do they require any prepositions? Would it be ...
0 votes
1 answer
19 views

launch ... to/into space

Normally, I expect the verb "launch" to go with "into space." But I saw the following: Three rookie astronauts aboard SpaceX’s Crew-3 mission for NASA just launched to space for ...
94 votes
11 answers
269k views

Should I say "She is in the park" or "She is at the park"?

I am really confused. Which preposition is correct? She is in/at the park. They are in/at the park. I am in/at the park. Should I use in or at in these sentences?
0 votes
2 answers
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by preposition to describe location close to a person

I know that I can use by to refer to a place relative to a inanimate object: Let's meet by the door / building / flat... But what about a person? The following does not sound right: Let's meet by ...
-1 votes
1 answer
33 views

What are we in for today?

"Let go," said Annie. Jack pulled on his pack and followed her. What are we in for today? he wondered. Does " what are we in for today" mean "how are we today"? Why are ...

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