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Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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1answer
80 views

What is the complement of “since”?

I want to say that a certain fact is true "from the beginning of the story to the present". But AFAIK, the preposition "from" is not so good for describing time, and I should use the preposition "...
24
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3answers
180k views

“Important to me” or “Important for me”

I cannot easily figure out which one is more appropriate to use: It's important to me. It's important for me. Are they the same? If not, what's the difference?
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5answers
10k views

Double preposition?

I am reading a journal and found a sentence which seems wrong. The sentence is, It is apparent that the errors originate from outside the model. This sentence used from and outside together ...
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1answer
166 views

Describing a section of text on a webpage [closed]

I'm trying to describe some text on a webpage, here is the screenshot(red frame part) and what I say: On the page, under the images album and the three text banners, there should be a section of ...
2
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1answer
88 views

What is this “for” here?

The Saudis still share strategic interests with the United States and continue to play a large global energy role for their ability to increase oil production so prices do not spike even as OPEC, the ...
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2answers
45k views

'At your own risk' or 'On your own risk'?

I think these sentences are grammatical: Try this company on your own risk. Read on your own risk. Watch it on your own risk. But then... Parking at your own risk? I'm confused ...
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3answers
5k views

What does the “since” mean?

From BBC News: The US, Japan and South Korea say they have since defied the ruling. In this sentence, there is a strange "since" that I cannot understand. In my view, "since" means from a ...
1
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1answer
62 views

What does this over mean; looked over at?

Harry looked over at the Slytherin table and saw a horrible ghost sitting there, with blank staring eyes, a gaunt face, and robes stained with silver blood. He was right next to Malfoy who, Harry was ...
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2answers
201k views

'study in' or 'study at' (some university)?

I myself normally use at in a sentence such as "I want to study at the Stanford University." But when I saw someone wrote "I want to go to study in the Stanford University," though sounded a little ...
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1answer
77 views

How to understand the preposition “with”? What does the phrase “with young people” modify?

A new TV series in England, Away from it all, has surprised everyone by becoming a huge success with young people across the country.
7
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1answer
1k views

Using “in” for describing people's outfits

What is the difference between the following sentences? There was a woman in red earrings. There was a woman with red earrings. There was a woman with wearing red earrings. I understand ...
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0answers
24 views

What does “off” mean in this sentence? [duplicate]

What does "off" mean in this sentence? Ron continued to giggle, still hanging off the front of Harry's robes. Ahead of this sentence, the context is that Ron grabed front of Harry's robes. I ...
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1answer
197 views

“…more I do something more…” Construction

I want to write some message about some programming language. The more I write a code on "language name" the more it's pleased to me. Is this sentence correct? How I should say it correctly?
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2answers
26k views

sit on the beach vs. sit at the beach

At first I thought it is "at the beach" then after a quick Google search I found out that it is flat out "on the beach". However, I have found one instance where a woman, presumably a native speaker, ...
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0answers
34 views

Which preposition should I use? [duplicate]

Which one should I use here? IN June 2014 or ON June 2014 Why? Thanks.
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1answer
2k views

How I can say correctly to my boss that I want to go to vacation?

I want to ask to my boss that I want to go to vacation, because I'm very tired. How I can say it correctly to my boss. It's my version: I'm very tired. I haven't gone to vacation a long time. There ...
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3answers
2k views

Where can I use “arrive to”?

I know the difference between arrive at and arrive in, but where can I use arrive to? A car arrived to the gate. Should I use arrived at?
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1answer
1k views

By + gerund, or gerund only

I managed to win using this technique. I managed to win by using this technique. Which is correct? And why?
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3answers
484 views

Why is this sentence correct?

In 2005, fiction made up the largest proportion of items borrowed at 35% with children's books and DVDs equally second at 20% each. I have two question about this. The preposition with is followed ...
3
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1answer
139 views

Preposition usage with locations on a webpage

For describing a section of webpage, for example, which should it be? ...logo at the top right of the page... or ...logo in the top right of the page... or ...logo on the top right of the ...
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2answers
19k views

“The opportunity for [x]” or “the opportunity to [x]”?

I am qualified to have the opportunity for this beautiful journey for many reasons. I am qualified to have the opportunity to this beautiful journey for many reasons. Which is more correct in ...
3
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3answers
2k views

How to use separable three-word phrasal verbs with the object is a pronoun

I found something on this webpage: “get back from” is stated to be either: Inseparable, meaning return from somewhere, or Separable, meaning receive something originally lent to another person....
1
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1answer
736 views

Are three word phrasal verbs always inseparable?

I found this sentence from the internet Unfortunately, I wasn't able to keep up on the news while I was away on vacation. I understand that it (keep up on) is inseparable. However, I wonder ...
3
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2answers
626 views

Are there tools or techniques to stop translating literally?

My girlfriend speaks English as her third language, but not yet fluently. Her vocabulary is quite extensive, especially due to the fact that she reads a lot (fiction and non-fiction) and regularly ...
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1answer
2k views

Preposition usage with “system”, or a circumstance

As a programmer, my job frequently asks me to write reports. I'm confused about the usage of prepositions with “system” and other circumstance terms. For instance, which should it be? … ...
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1answer
412 views

“made of ”and “made from”

The Source These people—who may well include you and me—are eating bread made of air, and so, in a sense, are made of air as well. Isn't this supposed to be "made from air" because the air is not ...
0
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1answer
95 views

“In” versus “at”

I'm confused about when to use in and when to use at. Here's an example of a phrase I use in email communication: Please find the daily report at attachment. Is "at attachment" correct, or ...
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1answer
149 views

Can prepostions link verbs to other words?

I read that a preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. However, I saw these sentences and explanations below from the internet. Josie drove to relax. (to ≠ ...
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1answer
4k views

Preposition: Pay attention in your studies

I think the usual way to say it is: Pay attention to your studies. But is it also acceptable to use in? Pay attention in your studies.
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1answer
764 views

Usage of prepositions is very difficult to choose

I want to explain my results. So I use a figure to explain an erroneous result. Here my idea is to tell, because of missing of a specific segment (say segment 8), I got the wrong result. Assume, I ...
8
votes
1answer
155k views

provides information “on”, “of” or “about” somthing?

Which is grammatical: "it provides information on something", or, "it provides information of something", or, "it provides information about something"? Or if all are grammatical, which one is used ...
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2answers
9k views

Is it “at the porch” or “on the porch”?

a) She was reading a book ON the porch. b) She was reading a book AT the porch. Which is correct?
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1answer
178 views

using correct preposition

If I have the following idea, The influence of A, B and C to the reconstruction process is discussed in next section. I am not sure whether I used the correct preposition. I feel I should use ...
8
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3answers
23k views

“many times” or “for many times”?

I have been struggling whether or not using "for" in front of "many times". Some explanations on the internet say "for many times" is British English and "many times" is American English. Also, "for ...
2
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1answer
335 views

When can 'alongside' be used to express parallelism between objects?

Are the cars depicted in the first two scenes below parked alongside the wall? If yes, let's suppose that all cars except one have gone away. Are the cars depicted in the scenes below still parked ...
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4answers
3k views

Why is wine made 'from' grapes, but tables are made 'of' wood?

(1) Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes or other fruits. (Wikipedia) (2) Tables were made of marble or wood and metal (typically bronze or silver alloys), sometimes with ...
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1answer
10k views

anchored + by/in/on/to

I've seen many research papers that used the four prepositions quite interchangeably after the verb anchor, specifically in this sentence: This study is anchored by/in/on/to the theory (or concept) ...
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2answers
121 views

'from … from …' usage

... our perspective, but what does it look like when the moon blocks sunlight from the Earth from space. (Source: Earth from an alien's eye view: How our planet looks from a different perspective ...
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1answer
578 views

aboard: part of speech and its replacement for 'on board'

Gus was aboard the president's train as it steamed out of Union Station in Washington, D.C., at seven o'clock in the evening on Wednesday, September 3. Wilson was dressed in a blue blazer, white ...
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2answers
112k views

Allow (to) + infinitive, substantive, verb+ -ing

In which way can the verb allow be used? There is always some confusion and apparently it's often intuitively used wrongly. Which form corresponds to correct English, eventually depending on context (...
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3answers
2k views

Why is “got in the car” relatively common, whereas “got in Japan” is not?

"got in the car": 50,000,000 hits "got into the car": 17,900,000 hits "got in Japan": 178,000 hits "got into Japan": 1,160,000 hits After having observed that the hit ratio of "got in the ...
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1answer
58 views

“Have/has” vs. “of”

Given "the account that has the number 45823", can we replace the has with of to get "the account number of 45823"? And what about "the account of the number 45823"? I could not find this in any ...
2
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1answer
5k views

'I'm going into the city' vs. 'I'm going to the city'

Suppose a person is relatively close to Los Angeles, say one mile, could they say 'I'm going into the city'? If yes, suppose that that person is 50 miles from Los Angeles, could they say 'I'm going to ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Using 'under' to describe the relative position of a chair with respect to a table

With reference to the scene depicted in the picture below, is it correct to say that the chair is under the table? I'm unsure because: not all the chair is directly down from the table; a part of ...
5
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3answers
875 views

Why is 'on and above' used so frequently?

Why is on and above used in the following sentence, rather than on or above alone? But foreign policy statements are made all the time on and above the sidewalks of New York. -- Bright Lights ...
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3answers
836 views

What is the “to” in “… for you to assess …”?

We’ve worked with Coursera to create new software for you to assess each other’s work. Isn't this supposed to be "for you to assess each other's work with?" Like, I have a pen to write with. Because ...
7
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2answers
224 views

Can we use “to” with a noun?

I found this statement, The paper presents an automatic approach to reconstruction of 3D objects from point cloud data. But I feel like this is wrong as I learned with to "should be infinitive". ...
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2answers
3k views

Expressing a purpose with for + gerund?

The question is simple but I would like to understand the principle governing the choice of prepositions in the following examples. I know it is not correct to say, for example 1) *I have come here ...
5
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1answer
9k views

'In' vs. 'On' followed by a year

I come across a Wikipedia article where it is written: Bush left office in 1993. Is 'In' correct there? Or, maybe, 'On' would be better, 'Bush left office on 1993 ...'? Or both are legal English ...
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1answer
240 views

figure captions - the way to describe

When I am describing a figure caption in a technical paper, I think it should be concise. So what should I say if I am describing a poly line whose irregularities are preserved by the technique that ...