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Questions tagged [prepositions]

A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

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Is it “on chat” or “in chat” or “over chat”

Normally, I always use on chat when referring to something another user said/commented about in the past. But recently, two or three other users have sometimes corrected me saying that it should ...
0
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1answer
347 views

Money “to buy it” or “to buy it *with*”

There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, […] (Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird) Is with bound to be there. or can we avoid using with?
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2answers
196k views

Working in / for / at?

Which is the correct way to tell where I'm working? I'm working in XYZ company. I'm working for XYZ company. I'm working at XYZ company. Or is there any difference in the meaning?
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4answers
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When should I use “when” and “while”?

But you can't find anything while you're crying. But you can't find anything when you're crying. I'll tell you about it while Frank saddles the horse. I'll tell you about it when Frank saddles ...
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1answer
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Well enough vs. good enough [duplicate]

In answer to the question: Can you speak English? Which of the following is correct? I can speak it good enough. I can speak it well enough.
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2answers
72k views

To eat at/in a restaurant

How do you say in English, "to eat at a restaurant" or "to eat in a restaurant"?
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1answer
1k views

Verb + Preposition (how to learn)

I have been learning English recently, but I have problems with learning English verbs and prepositions. I know how some verbs work. I let you do it I allow you to do it I said to you a week ago I ...
9
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1answer
10k views

What is the meaning of “in” and “on” when they are used together?

I have never seen the prepositions in and on used together in any sentence. I cannot imagine what in out would mean in a sentence. However, I recently have seen this kind of usage, and I had ...
5
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1answer
6k views

“Excel in” or “Excel at”

Consider the following sentence: I have always tried to excel in/at courses relevant to veterinary sciences, such as physics, biology and chemistry. Which one is correct? A quick google search ...
3
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1answer
447 views

“across” vs. “in” in “animals are likely to be introduced 'across'/'in' the market”

Currently available GM fruits stem mostly from plants, but in the future foods derived from GM microorganisms or GM animals are likely to be introduced across / in the market. Note: GM means ...
7
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1answer
2k views

Which sentence is correct? He dismounted his horse. or He dismounted from his horse

Trying to say, he got down from his horse. Which sentence is grammatically correct? And, why? He dismounted his horse. He dismounted from his horse. Is there any difference if you were to replace ...
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5answers
3k views

Upon Vs. On in the sentence?

While conversing with my friend I got confused between these two sentences: It depends upon the context. It depends on context. Which one is more apt in usage and why?
9
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3answers
755 views

When to use “of”, “in” and “at”?

I never know how to use prepositions like of, in or at. What's the rules for each one of then? My last doubt was about this sentence: Order of importance Order in importance Order at importance ...
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2answers
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Are these two agreements all right?

Wiktionary.com has two examples for ‘as well as’: conjunction and preposition. Are the two sentences below grammatically correct? (preposition) He as well as you is right. (conjunction) He as ...
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1answer
2k views

Choosing correct preposition

In the construction below, which preposition is grammatically correct: by or from (or perhaps something else)? As the process particularly runs over the objects extracted by second constraint, a ...
2
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2answers
241 views

“without” vs. “minus”

Minus its prop, the gesture seems overlarge. And in the corrido waltz ''Nacho Verduzco'' (minus its story of drugs and guns), John Sherba's violin, [...] It looks like a capital letter R, ...
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2answers
452 views

Dropping a preposition

Uncle Vernon made another funny noise, like a mouse being trodden on. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) Can on at the end of the sentence be dropped?
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2answers
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When I Should use “up” in sentences

1 - "I picked up my phone and called up my friend". 2 - "I went up and got myself registered". 3 - "Early in the morning we got up" I never know when to use the term "up". How would these ...
3
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1answer
272 views

How does a preposition interfere with the intransitive/transitive usage of the verb “beckon”?

She indicated or beckoned for him to retrace his steps and come in. I came across the above piece probably written on an online English newspaper, but I'm not sure. Is for correct after beckoned? ...
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2answers
35k views

What is the difference between “don't” & “won't” in the given sentences?

Are these sentences different or same? They don't let you smoke in here. They won't let you smoke in here. Also, is it necessary to use in in the sentences? Would the meaning of sentences ...
9
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1answer
33k views

“regardless whether” vs. “regardless of whether”

But for statistical purposes, a 14-year-old boy who works at least one hour a week is officially considered employed, regardless whether he is paid. Is "of" obligatory after regardless in regardless ...
5
votes
1answer
767 views

Can I put 'about' in “I'll email you 'about' the date”

When the date of the party is fixed, I'll let you know. In this situation, should I say: I'll email you the date. or can I say: I'll email you about the date.
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3answers
2k views

“My friend gave it to me” vs. “I got it 'off'/'from' my friend”

Could one replace, whitout changing in meaning, "my friend gave it to me" with "I got it off my friend"? Searching on Internet I came across several instances of "I got it off my chest", but, alas, I ...
7
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1answer
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Adjective's complements

A senior army officer is accusing the Defense Force of being far too slow to address cases of abuse. (ABC News) When the adjective, slow, has its complement with to-infinitive, gerund (or ...
4
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1answer
313 views

Applying to or applying in

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct: I am always interested in applying my research to various fields I am always interested in applying my research in various fields
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3answers
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“Suggest me” or “Suggest to me”

Could you please suggest me which word to use. Could you please suggest to me which word to use. I am not sure which of the above two forms is grammatical. I am confused because for tell verb we ...
3
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1answer
202 views

Why “the Australian Capital Territory” but not “the New South Wales”?

Why is "the" used in "the Australian Capital Territory", but not before "New South Wales"? Is it as if you started off with "the territory", made "territory" start with a capital letter, and added in "...
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3answers
32k views

What is the difference between “look at” and “look to”?

I've heard/read/seen both "look at" and "look to" (and "look up at" and "look up to"). Is there a difference between the two? When should I use one over the other?
4
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1answer
144 views

Can a preposition be put before a noun phrase that expresses a period of time?

He's worked hard all year. When I speak the sentence in Korean, ‘all year’ can select a postposition or be used alone. For English, is this sentence, ‘He’s worked hard for[during] all year,’ proper?
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2answers
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Asking for a person: “Could I speak 'to'/'with' Kristina?”

If one is asking for a person, what should s/he say—1 or 2? Could I speak to Kristina? Could I speak with Kristina?
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2answers
2k views

“I broke it in[to] 'two pieces'/'half'”

1.A Cut the onion in small pieces. 1.B Cut the onion into small pieces. 2.A I broke it in two pieces. 2.B I broke it into two pieces. 3.A I broke it in half. 3.B I broke it ...
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2answers
331 views

Usage of “of” and “from” after some of verbs [closed]

In my mother tongue we use these prepositions after almost all verbs! But in English sometimes I doubt to use them or not for example after these verbs: Using of my PC or using my PC or etc. ...
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2answers
144 views

He squandered the money { on / in } gambling?

He squandered the money in gambling. He squandered the money on gambling. I think in gambling is correct, but when I speak on gambling, that also sounds correct. I think both are correct. If it is ...
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2answers
197 views

“Enamored with” vs. “Enamored of”

On stackoverflow.com I found 583 occurrences of "enamored with" and 209 occurrences of "enamored of". Does this mean that "enamored" take normally the preposition "with"—or, both prepositions, "...
4
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2answers
396 views

What does the preposition ‘with’ mean in this sentence?

South African track star Oscar Pistorius has been granted bail over the murder of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. The decision was made after a four-day hearing, with the magistrate ruling the ...
7
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1answer
11k views

difference between “in” and “out of” when talking of amounts

Tonight I was reading a text about the English language, which included the following sentence : One in ten people speak (English) as their mother tongue I was surprised by this usage, and so I ...
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2answers
231 views

Does the object include the preposition or not?

Don’t be afraid of making mistakes in speaking English. Is this the structure of [verb phrase: don’t be afraid of][object: making mistakes] or [verb phrase: don’t be afraid][object: of making ...
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2answers
461 views

Is there a more restrictive criterion to distinguish a preposition from an adverb

The definition normally given for adverb is similar to the following one: a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word-group Preposition is normally ...
2
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1answer
443 views

What role does this 'preposition plus relative pronoun' take?

While the direction was being executed, the lady consulted moved slowly up the room. I suppose I have a considerable organ of veneration, for I retain yet the sense of admiring awe with which my ...
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1answer
3k views

“between X and Y” vs. “between X to Y”

It is estimated that there were between twenty-five to forty African American deaths. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlanta_Race_Riot) Could the wikipedia quote above be considered "standard" English ...
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2answers
1k views

“in the few” or “the few”

What's the correct phrase to use in the case below? It happened the few days before the meteor shower. It happened in the few days before the meteor shower.
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1answer
127 views

What’s the purpose of ‘for’?

You got there? You got Hermione's owl? We must have crossed in midair. No sooner had I reached London than it became clear to me that the place I should be was the one I had just left. I arrived ...
6
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2answers
182 views

Is “of” strictly needed in “out 'of' the [door]/[city]”?

A1. I stuck my head out the door just to check that the place wasn't burning down. A2. I stuck my head out of the door just to check that the place wasn't burning down. B1. There may be ...
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3answers
11k views

How do I tell somebody not to tell me lies?

How should I say to somebody not to tell me lies? Don't lie to me. Don't lie with me. Don't lie on me. Don't lie me. Don't lie. I am sure that, because of the various meanings lie has, some of those ...
2
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1answer
7k views

“Congratulations on …” or “congratulations for …”?

While I was chatting with one of my friends on Facebook, I wrote this to him after he was selected in a on-campus recruitment drive by the company TCS from our college: Congratulation on being ...
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2answers
5k views

Starting a sentence with a preposition

Recently I've heard someone say "Off I go." At first it sounded a bit strange, then I've realized maybe it could be a saying. Or maybe not. So here it is my question: Are there any other sentences, or ...
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2answers
5k views

Problem (with) doing something

When you want to say that you had or are having problems with something, what is the best way to express this: I'm having a problem with saying this correctly. I'm having a problem saying this ...
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5answers
2k views

Is ending a sentence with a preposition acceptable?

When I learned English at school, I was taught that I should not end a sentence with a preposition. Is it correct to end a sentence with a preposition? To avoid starting a sentence with a ...
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3answers
758 views

Why “about” in “she kept walking about the room”?

Regarding the sentence She kept walking about the room. Is that ok to use "in" instead, as in She kept walking in the room Why is "about" used in this sentence? Is there any difference to ...
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6answers
7k views

“In” and “on”: How can I decide which one to use for vehicles?

Examples: In a car, van, etc. On a bus, boat, motorcycle, etc. How can one decide which preposition to use? Is memorization the only way or is there a better way? Note: People generally explain ...