Questions tagged [present-perfect]

For questions about use of the present perfect, a verb construction which implies a present state arising out of a past eventuality.

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"It hasn't get updated yet" or "It has not gotten any updates yet" or "It hasn't got updated"?

I want to say I have checked the status for one product and there is no new update on it's status. Which of these is correct? "It hasn't get updated yet" or "It has not gotten any ...
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Present perfect mixed with simple past tense in the same sentence

“Alongside my job, I have also found a longing to help others and became a volunteer at the homeless shelter.” Is this sentence grammatically correct? While it sounds okay, I’m concerned about the ...
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"to have been to" and "to have gone to". Which should I use?

In the situation where you want to mention your experience of going to London, you use "been" instead of "gone", don't you? As in I have been to London three times. and you don'...
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The translation (of the article) has been going on all day

Is this sentence the correct/idiomatic? If not, could you please tell me why? "The translation (of the article) has been going on all day."
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I want you to finish/to have finished

I've given a friend of mine a task to do. I want him to finish it before I come in after an hour. Which the simple or the perfect infinitive better with before and by? I want you to finish it before ...
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I have eaten / had eaten / ate seaweed when I was in Thailand three years ago

quora.com: 1a) I have eaten seaweed when I was in Thailand three years ago. My variants: 1b) I had eaten seaweed when I was in Thailand three years ago. 1c) I ate seaweed when I was in Thailand three ...
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What is the difference between present perfect and present perfect continuous in this example

I've always struggled with these two tenses, for example, is there any difference between these two sentences, or is one of them just wrong? I have been working all my life, I should have a home by ...
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I have been to London BUT I have been on a plane/ in a cave

There are several threads about which prepositions one can use after "have/has been" (present perfect simple). I understand that "been" can be the past participle of "be" ...
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haven't been swimming vs haven't gone swimming

In the following text: A: Do you ever go swimming? B: Not these days. I haven't ________________ a long time. Can I say I haven't been going swimming for a long time. I haven't gone swimming for a ...
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I haven't waited vs I haven't been waiting

In the following text: A: I'm sorry I'm late. B: That's OK. I _______________ long. I answered haven't waited but the correct answer is haven't been waiting Could you explain the difference ...
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Have you been saving money?

Me: Have you been saving money lately? Peter: No, I haven't. If I ask Peter again: "do you save money?", is it possible for him to answer, "yes, I do"? Me: Do you save money? ...
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Having been built vs being built

This bridge, which has been built for nine years, will be the longest in our city. ( Intended meaning: the bridge is yet to finish; people have worked on it for nine years) This bridge, __ (being ...
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I didn't eat since breakfast vs. I haven't eaten since breakfast

This question came in the Dhaka University admission test 2008-09 I didn't eat since breakfast I haven't eaten since breakfast Q) No grammatical error occurs in (a) I didn't eat since breakfast. (b) ...
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meaning of "has been on"

In the following example: Scott has been on holiday. He had a terrible time. I always thought that "Scott has been on holiday" would mean "He is still on it". But past simple, in ...
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He didn't do that from when he was a teenager

I've recently learnt that we can use "since" only with the connection to the present. But how should we say about THOSE ABSOLUTELY SAME actions but after they stopped? (I know about the past ...
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Which is correct? "Today I've done something that I've never done before." or "Today I've done something I never did before

Question: Which is correct? "Today I've done something that I've never done before." or "Today I've done something I never did before. Personally, the second one seems the most logical ...
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Present perfect or past perfect in a (specific) sentence?

I start with the assumption that the following sentence is correct. John told me that his father had been ill since Christmas. My question is whether the above sentence can also accommodate the ...
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Questions about a time expression with a present perfect tense

I found an English site with quizzes which native speakers built. I was asked to fill in this gap: How long have you been here _____? 1)since 2)for The correct option is "for". I don't ...
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PRESENT PERFECT/PPC for actions with duration

Context: My friend's come to visit me and I am showing him my new country house (which I am still working on in my free time, haven't finished it yet) As far as I understand, I've worked on this ...
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Past Continuous with the Present Perfect

Could someone help me to fix a sentence? I’d like to say: I was going to Italy before the war have come into my country. I’m not sure that it’s correct. I’d like to use Present Perfect because it ...
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What is the difference between "are passed" and "have passed"?

What is the difference between following two answers: I can confirm the results are passed. I can confirm the results have passed. The scenario was that a sample was submitted to the lab and the ...
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Have you brushed your teeth this morning? [duplicate]

Can a teacher ask: "Have you brushed your teeth this morning?" if a child is at school and has no opportunity to brush them later that morning if they haven't yet, because their brush is at ...
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Past Simple or Present Perfect when writing that something was/has been generated

I have very simple sentence, however I have 3 problems with it. The major one is whether I should you Past Simple or Present Perfect when saying that something was/has been generated. The Second one ...
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Does present perfect imply several times in this example?

If I say: I've seen him at the supermarket" does this imply I've seen him several times at the supermarket or can I say it if I've seen him only once (without including the word "once")?...
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The United Kingdom had its coldest April night since 2018

Normally, you'd need the present perfect (or the past perfect) when accompanied by since, as in: The United Kingdom has had more than 1 million diagnosed cases of the coronavirus since the start of ...
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I've had 5 cups of coffee today. Does this mean I'll have more?

Is it true that if I say: "I've had 5 cups of coffee today" I intend to drink more today and if I say: "I had 5 cups of coffee today" I am not going to drink any more coffee today? ...
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I've been to the shops today or I went to the shops today

I have a question about the use of present perfect and past simple with unfinished time. What is the difference between "I've been to the shops today" and I went to the shops today"? ...
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have been to China twice Vs have gone to China twice?

We can say I’ve been to China twice. But can we say I have gone to China twice? Is it true? Is there any difference, or can they be used in the same situations?
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"They have got water coming up to their knees". vs "Water comes up to their knees". Which one is more idiomatic?

A native speaker is telling about the floods, how it happens, how people behave during floods, etc. and she says: They've got water coming up to their knees. I know this structure is commonly used ...
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Which Perfect aspect should be used: "I’ve read / been reading this page three times already…”? [closed]

I’ve been reading this page three times already, but I still don’t understand it. Or I’ve read this page three times already, but I still don’t understand it. Is the action in progress or is it ...
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Question in present perfect, but answer in past simple. Why not a past simple question?

From the English workbook "access 2", page 48: Finish the dialogue with verb forms in the present perfect or simple past. Dan: Have you ever been to Dartmoor, Amira? Amira: Yes, I have. I ...
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Present/Past Perfect with 'in' in positive sentences

As I know 'for' shows incompleteness even with Present Perfect. And there's much difference between "I read that book in two days" which means "It took me two days to complete the book&...
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He said he has read that book VS He said he had read that book

He said he has read that book. He said he had read that book. Both of these sentences are grammatically correct. It seems there is a nuance in meaning between them. So, what is the nuance?
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"I have taught Italian for three years." vs "I have been teaching Italian for three years"

If you still teach Italian at school, which would be better? A) I have taught Italian for three years. B) I have been teaching Italian for three years. If they are both fine, is there any difference?
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I have studied at university an achievement?

I am a middle aged woman who went to university where I studied French. This was 30 years ago . If someone asks me: "what have you studied?" can I answer: "I have studied French at ...
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Repair verb with present perfect and present perfect continuous

I have been working on tenses of English and I have been confusing about present perfect and present perfect continuous. So, I wonder about the repair verb with present perfect and present perfect ...
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can I use "own" in progressive?

I ...... this car for more than ten years. a) have owned b) have been owning c) owned d) will own So what's the difference between a,b and c
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Present and past perfect

I’ve got a problem with the choice of these tenses in my story,In my story I threw a party, which was about 2 weeks ago, and now I’m telling this story, so, which is correct for mentioning this verb ...
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Is "i've forgotten to" possible here? [duplicate]

Suppose I'm on the train on my way to work and I suddenly realise I've forgotten to close my bedroom window, can I say: "I've forgotten to close my window!"? Or is past simple the only ...
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have you locked the door or did you lock the door?

I have a question about the use of phrases like "Have you locked the door", "have you closed the windows" etc. Can these phrases be used when you left your house a while ago and ...
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What is the difference between "when the night has come" and "when the night comes"?

In the song "stand by me", we can see the sentence like "when the night has come" but I am curious why he used the present perfect. He could write a song like "when the night ...
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"Over the years/past two years I have learned how to drive fast"

"Over the years/past two years I have learned how to drive fast". To be precise, instead of the sentence I need to know whether the word "over" means during or since/for (as in ...
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"I hope you haven't been bored listening to us." vs "I hope you are not bored listening to us." Why perfect tense?

At the end of a British radio programme on "boredom", the presenter says: "I hope you haven't been bored listening to us." The sentence sounded different, because I would say: &...
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The present perfect semantics

How could these explanations be understood? McCoard (1978) (and also Sorensen, 1964: 78) takes great pains to disprove that 'He has died' means 'He is dead', a line of reasoning which he qualifies as &...
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Continuous / Perfect (Continuous) Imperatives (with infinitive and subjunctive)

Sometimes it's necessary to use a specific aspect of tenses (simple, continuous, perfect, perfect continuous), but when we ask people to do something should (can) we use the same aspects in order to ...
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Is this present perfect statement from Novak Djokovic gramatically correct?

In his recent interview with BBC, Novak Djokovic says (link to the interview starting at 3:51): You know, no one in the whole process, during the Australian saga, has asked me on my stance or my ...
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"It's believed to have served" vs "It's believed to serve"

I've recently spotted the following sentence and it got me thinking: It's believed to have served as... What kind of grammatical structure is this? Why is present perfect being used here? Would it ...
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Have you ever told your friend Peter that you wanted/want to go to the US for further education?

You have been wanting to go to the US for further education. Your parents ask you: Have you ever told your friend Peter that you wanted to go to the US for further education? Have you ever told your ...
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When to use "have you got/gotten it"?

As soon as I finish explaining a math question, I ask my students, Do you get it? Here, I don't think it's right to ask "have you got/gotten it". When should I use "have you got/...
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Have you changed or did you change

This is from a newspaper: Have you radically changed your dress sense in later life? We would like to hear from people who have changed their dress style dramatically. Did you undergo a style ...
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