Questions tagged [progressive-aspect]

Questions related to the grammatical aspect that expresses an incomplete action or a state at a specific point in time. For specific tenses, see the tags 'present-progressive', 'present-continuous', 'future-progressive', 'past-continuous' and 'perfect-continuous'.

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7
votes
3answers
25k views

what's the difference between did and was doing?

Here are examples of the sentences. What is the difference between them? They seem to be almost the same to me so I don’t exactly understand the difference. We worked from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm ...
3
votes
1answer
613 views

In 'having trouble -ing', does the 'ing' have progressive meaning?

But it is clear that a number of major public employers are having trouble affording the state’s current pension system. (nytimes.com) When we have verb-ing form after trouble, does it imply the ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Usage of the Present simple and the Future Progressive [duplicate]

Why we use the Present Simple in the sentence: The train leaves at half past six tomorrow morning. I think the future progressive also may use there. It is because future progressive can denote ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Why the present progressive tense is used in “you are coming from”

In a brand's advertising commentary, there is “You don’t have to say a word to let them know where you are coming from”. I am wondering why the present progressive tense is used in "you are coming ...
8
votes
3answers
26k views

“is still being used” versus “is still used”

I once asked a question with the title: Is the word cloths still being used? And someone edited it to: Is the word cloths still used? Why is the first progressive one wrong?
8
votes
2answers
5k views

Present Perfect and Past Progressive with wait

Imagine that you're waiting for your friend X and you finally meet him. Is it better to use Past Progressive or Present Perfect here? I've been waiting for you for 5 hours. or I was waiting for ...
2
votes
3answers
7k views

“The links are not working” vs. “the links don't work”

My manager at work has sent me two links for competitors in order to check their products. Unfortunately, these links are not working. I want to send a reply to my manager to inform her of this ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

go on package holidays (Present Perfect Simple vs. Progressive)

Swan in his book, Practical English Usage, in 459.2, p.447 under the heading temporary or permanent says: "We use progressive forms mostly for shorter, temporary actions and situations. When we talk ...
6
votes
2answers
8k views

(How many years) have you been married?/studying English?

Grammar books set rules for ELL when they want to ask questions to use present perfect form for counting, and present perfect progressive for periods of time. Now what if you want to ask about a ...
1
vote
2answers
85 views

Is progressive denote ineptness?

Then she changed her desk into a pig and back again. They were all very impressed and couldn't wait to get started, but soon realized they weren't going to be changing the furniture into animals for a ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

How do I use “I had been watching” in a sentence?

Please help me to write a sentence with I had been watching What does it mean exactly? When do we use it?
3
votes
1answer
210 views

Can progressive aspects express the ongoing effect of an activity?

"The Sorting Ceremony will take place in a few minutes in front of the rest of the school. I suggest you all smarten yourselves up as much as you can while you are waiting." Her eyes ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“is being on something”

The second sentence causes me problems. I have seen it somewhere. For me it looks like the verb to be is used twice (is / being). Is it grammatically correct? If yes, what does the second usage give ...
2
votes
2answers
34k views

“See you next week” vs. “I'll see you next week” vs. “I'll be seeing you next week”

Is there a difference in meaning and use between these sentences? See you next week. I'll see you next week. I'll be seeing you next week. When I say good-bye to a friend, I tend to say ...
1
vote
2answers
673 views

“I'd be seeing you soon”

   "Good afternoon," said a soft voice. Harry jumped. Hagrid must have jumped, too, because there was a loud crunching noise and he got quickly off the spindly chair.    An ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

“I'll phone you tonight”: why is this not proper?

(1) I phone her tonight. (2) I’m phoning her tonight. (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language) (1) and (2) are all possible expressions: (1) as a schedule or plan, (2) could be used in the ...
2
votes
2answers
244 views

Can 'at the moment' be so long as to read a novel?

I am reading ‘Middlemarch’ at the moment. Some situations are not strictly continuous but allow for gaps, and the concept of ‘in progress at Tr’ is perfectly consistent with Tr actually coinciding ...
2
votes
2answers
601 views

Future Continuous with planned actions?

Does the Future Continuous create the idea of a planned action as well as the Present Continuous does? If I say "I am seeing Jim tomorrow." I think it means that I have arranged it. It's also OK to ...
0
votes
0answers
2k views

It has been developed vs It is being developed [duplicate]

What is the difference between the following sentences? It has been developed vs It is being developed It has been held vs. It is being held Which tense is "is being" used here and ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“I have never done it” vs “I have never been doing it”

"I have never been dating." I heard some non-native speaker said it. For me it should be just Present Perfect ("I have never dated.") Because my grammar book says that an absence of some action in ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Ascertain exact tense from reported speech

Alphonse tells me: “Scott said he had been studying Greek for five years.” I am trying to imagine what Scott could actually have told Alphonse. I can come up with two situations: a) Scott: “I ...
0
votes
2answers
179 views

Simple + Simple clauses when one event interrupts another

If he had been standing near the house when the wall collapsed, it would have killed him. If he had stood near the house when the wall collapsed, it would have killed him. Does the second sentence ...
3
votes
2answers
20k views

“I have been 'verb-ing'” vs. “I had been 'verb-ing'”

A. I have been studying English for one year. B. I had been studying English for one year. Could one who hears those sentences argue that "A" case implies "and I am still studying it&...

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