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Questions tagged [pronouns]

A pronoun is a word that is used instead of a noun or noun phrase.

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Difference between a determiner and a pronoun?

Cambridge dictionary examples and what I learnt - Can someone please clarify if the words in bold are determiners or pronouns? Each of my teachers has long hair. Both of my close friends live in ...
James Mathai's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

object pronoun + gerund

"Sometimes, I like a few things about being a social media influencer. / me being a social media influencer. I have seen people use the first structure, but also the second structure with ...
hwkal's user avatar
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1 answer
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“Only vs itself” which one should I use?

Should I use "itself" or "only" when I say I don't have something. Example: a. itself: I don't have insta ID itself b. only: I don't have insta ID only
Yaalan appa's user avatar
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20 views

When referring to a large entity (such as an organisation), do we use singular or plural? [duplicate]

Microsoft are forcing people to switch to Windows 11, or Microsoft is forcing people to switch to Windows 11?
roundabout's user avatar
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1 answer
67 views

Is 'more other' grammatically correct?

Consider the following sentence: Within your template, the dependsOn element enables you to define one resource dependent on one or more other resources. Is it grammatically correct to use 'more ...
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0 answers
21 views

which is something you often do

a. Tom blames himself and Jack does too. Could that sentence mean that Jack blames Tom too, or does it always mean that Jack blames himself? b. I talked to my mother, and you did too. I think that one ...
azz's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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"What" or "which" in questions presuming picking out object(s) in mind first and identifying their belonging to some class in the definitive answer

I have two subtly different situations. There are two pictures in one of which some (living) things are present that are absent in the other. How should one correctly put questions of this type: &...
Eugene's user avatar
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1 answer
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The use of its vs. their for numbers

The title of my work is: "RANKING FUZZY NUMBERS AND ITS APPLICATIONS TO FUZZY DECISION-MAKING PROBLEMS" Kindly suggest whether the word "its" needs to be changed to "their&...
S.S's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
256 views

Should "this" be replace by "it"?

I remember I learned somewhere that when using "this" again, better change to "it"? But why does the book use "this" in the second question? Is the book wrong or what I ...
newbie forever's user avatar
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0 answers
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What type of "it" is used in "It had been agreed…"?

What type of "it" is used in this sentence: It had been agreed that they should all meet in the big barn as soon as Mr. Jones was safely out of the way.
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3 votes
1 answer
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pronoun "it" question in context

If your dog pesters you for petting when you need to be doing something else, break off visual contact with him. You can use your torso to push him away with a body block (remember not to use your ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Can I use "they" to refer to the singular "population"?

Can I use "they" to refer to the singular "population"? An aging population can heavily strain public health systems, a drawback that far outweighs any potential benefits they may ...
newbie forever's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
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How to pronounce and detect 'd

Could someone show me how to pronounce it and detect it when hearing I'd You'd he'd it'd we'd they'd
Liap's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
33 views

“It is a great deal!” vs “This is a great deal!” vs “That is a great deal!” vs “Those are a great deal!”

What’s the correct answer for the following question set? Speaker A: I’ll buy these rugs as a memento of our holiday. Speaker B: __________ a great idea! a. Those are (a great idea!) b. It’s (a ...
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3 votes
3 answers
80 views

What does "this" refer to?

The text below is from a book published by Cambridge University Press. Does "this" refer to the entire bold part or only the "so" clause? If it refers to only the "so" ...
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
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Do we need to use “each” with a plural subject describing an item they both possess?

In this sentence below, do we need to add the indefinite pronoun “each” to make sure it’s clear both cars have a single hook? Or is it already understood without it? “Two identical cars each with a ...
Piermo's user avatar
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1 answer
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Does this "anyone" mean "no one"?

I'm guessing the following sentence means "no one has respects for my perspective/opinion/insight/sentiments/humor". Suffice it to say, it's been a steady decline towards hopelessness that ...
K.N.'s user avatar
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1 answer
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To whom does "her" refer in "Her relationship with then-Senator Palpatine and his successor had been calm"?

In Star Wars: Queen's Shadow, Padme, the former queen and the current senator of Naboo, has returned to her home planet after a visit to Breha. Note that Palpatine is the previous senator for Naboo, ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
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2 answers
73 views

'For (his) betrayal, the general was simply demoted a little in rank.' vs. 'For the general's betrayal he was simply demoted a little in rank.'

I am trying to translate a sentence into English. Here is what I have got: For the general's betrayal, he was simply demoted a little in rank. For his betrayal, the general was simply demoted a ...
Mamamia's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
369 views

Who does "she" refer to in "She wasn’t the jealous type, but she’d always been curious, and Sabé rarely did anything first."?

In Star Wars: Queen's Shadow, there is a conversation between Padmé and Sabé: “Do you like him enough?”, Padme said. “I don’t know,” Sabé said. “We’ve talked about it, so it’s not like I’m leading ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
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1 answer
131 views

Three dozen or three dozens

Three dozen of eggs are bought. Three dozens of eggs are bought. Which expression is correct and why?
Abid's user avatar
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1 answer
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"We had enough firewood to keep us warm" and "We had enough firewood to keep ourselves warm" correct one?

"We had enough firewood to keep us warm" (I found this example in a book) "We had enough firewood to keep ourselves warm" (whereas this is the main question if this is correct) -...
hwkal's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Which antecedent does this pronoun refer to? ("John killed David in his car") [duplicate]

John killed David in his car. Who owned the car? In other words, which antecedent does the pronoun "his" refer to? John or David? Or you think this this sentence is actually so ambiguous ...
leeyuiwah's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can I use "each other/one another" in this situation?

There are people A, B, C, and D. A hit B, B hit C, C hit D, and D hit A. In this constricted situation, can I say "they hit each other/one another"?
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0 votes
1 answer
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What does “it” refer to in “it was too much to think of and sit still”

The following quote is from Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser: He would plead until her anger would melt—until she would forgive him. Suddenly he thought: “Supposing she isn't out there—suppose she ...
f6pafd's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
72 views

What does "it" refer to in this sentence

It would help if you created a timeline for yourself and stuck to it when completing your project. What does it refer to?
doraemon1's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

It, this and that in paragraphs - "that" or "this" first and then "it"?

Example 1 More and more people are discovering that Tai Chi is one of the most valuable forms of exercise. This has led to a big demand for classes. It will also promote the importance of physical ...
vincentlin's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
54 views

bigger than I have ever seen

a. That cat is bigger than I have ever seen. b. That cat is bigger than I have ever seen it. Is there a difference between the meanings of these sentences? I think 'a cat bigger than I have ever seen' ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
151 views

What exactly is a dummy-it?

When someone, for example, reads a book or watches a movie, and they say: "It was a good movie" or "It was a good reading" Are these kinds of sentences a dummy-it or just an &...
Sunless's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
83 views

Where does the practice of saying "the same" instead of "it/that/etc." come from in Indian English?

One often uses "the same" instead of "it/that/etc." in Indian English. Example: Meanwhile, Microsoft's chief technology officer Kevin Scott was informed by OpenAI's chief ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
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2 answers
113 views

Is it an error to use "it" to refer to two different things in one compound sentence?

An example: Alice: I've been to a vet. My cat has a tumor. Bob: Don't worry. If it's not malignant, it will be fine. Carmen: Are you sure this cake recipe is correct. Daniel: My grandmother gave it ...
Reverent Lapwing's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
103 views

How old are you—if you don’t mind me/my asking? [duplicate]

How old are you—if you don’t mind me asking? How old are you—if you don’t mind my asking? In TOEFL tests, 'my asking' was correct because 'my' is in a possessive case having 'asking' as an object, ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
229 views

When ask about someone's gender, can I say "Is it a man or a woman ?"

This is my son's textbook. Q:"Is it a man or woman" A: "A man" Guoguo: Hi, Mike. Why are you standing there? Mike: Hi, Guoguo. I'm waiting for my dad's friend. Guoguo: Is it a man ...
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

What does ‘they’ refer to?

From the TV series The Good Doctor, "When people need to know things, they need to know if they don't lie through their teeth and feel good about it." Do people and they refer to different ...
Ji Hyun Lee's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

If you say ..., does <that><it> mean ...?

[Situation: I am talking with Jane, who is a native speaker of English, about the vocabulary size of native speakers of English.] Kaguyahime: What's your passive vocabulary size? Jane: About 30,000. ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
205 views

When "you" is the subject of a question

When we use "you" in questions, there are two possible pronouns we can use in answers: "I" or "we". It depends on the context I just need to know if it’s true or false.
Arianna Briceño's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
93 views

What is "it" referring to in this sentence

One of them added that the diabolical shrieks and cackles of this species have earned it "It" in this sentence is referring to what? This book is from Richard Dawkins' God Delusion. In the ...
Bobi brai's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
123 views

Is the sentence "Each of my brothers wants his own car" correct?

Each of my brothers wants his own car I already know that each is always paired with singular but is the usage of "his" correct? Should it be "their" or "it"?
Letícia Vasconcellos Alves's user avatar
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0 answers
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Which sentence is correct? (In spite of) [duplicate]

As the title has suggested, I'd like to know which sentence using "in spite of" is correct: John keeps working in spite of him feeling unwell. John keeps working in spite of his feeling ...
hhhh's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
26 views

those of us who were new

Can one use a. He talked to us who were new at the office. b. He talked to you who were new at the office. c. He talked to them who were new at the office. instead of a1. He talked to those of us who ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
91 views

"you and your" vs "your and your"

At one point, you and your teammate's pokemons register a very low HP (1). At one point, your and your teammate's pokemons register a very low HP (2). Which of the two sentences is correct?
tryingtobeastoic's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

What does "that" mean in "is in the richest state that it has ever been in"?

Today humanity is in the richest state that it has ever been in. Do you consider that correct here? Can it be substituted with than? I think that would be wrong, but logically it fits in here. I can'...
user1425's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
152 views

It will be awesome/interesting/nice, etc. if you can join us. - is "it" a dummy it?

Example 1 It will be awesome/interesting/nice...etc. if you can join us. Example 2 If you can join us, it will be wesome/interesting/nice...etc. Can it be written this way like Example 2? I always ...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,353
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

possessive, object and reflexive pronouns

what's the difference between " a picture of us" , " a picture of ours" and " a picture of ourselves" ? and, does " a picture of us" really mean that the photo ...
UNICORN's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
84 views

Object Pronoun vs Reflexive pronoun

Question 13: She is too old. She can't look after herself, so she needs someone to look after _____. A) herself B) her C) something D) hers E) nothing The correct answer to the question above is B) ...
loloist's user avatar
  • 33
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

They have a passport/passports - the same in meaning?

Example 1 They have a passport. Example 2 They have passports. Do both mean every one of them has only one passport? Usually one person only has one passport. So the context can help, I think. I ...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,353
0 votes
1 answer
14 views

We/every one of us will earn 1 billion dollars - are they the same?

Can "we" mean "every one of us"? "We will earn 1 billion dollars." Can it mean "every one of us will earn 1 billion dollars?
vincentlin's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Is this sentence in line with pronoun of complement subject?

I read online that subject pronoun are used for subject complement. As such, is the following sentence correct? "He seems to be I" or should it end with object case? And why?
Akshit Raj's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
155 views

Are "I like when" and "I like it when" both grammatically correct, and if so, are they synonymous?

Example: Why don't airlines like when one intentionally misses a flight to save money? Why don't airlines like it when one intentionally misses a flight to save money? Are they both grammatically ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
155 views

Are both acceptable? "me and him" Vs "I and He"?

Me and him did it. I and he did it. Are both acceptable, If yes, how?
Sam's user avatar
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