Questions tagged [pronouns]

A pronoun is a word that is used instead of a noun or noun phrase.

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1answer
28 views

How should I address the readers in a product review?

Occasionally, I leave reviews on the games I play. I mostly use "the player" or "players" in my text to have a rather formal tone. However, my formal writing is not as rigid as you ...
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Should I use “it” or “one” in “…living in {it/one} is more uncomfortable…”?

Here is the context: I looked it up to see what it feels like to live in a castle. It seems like living in it is more uncomfortable than I thought. Firstly, castles aren't designed for dwelling ...
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In this sentence, does “it” refer back to terrorism?

Does "it" refer back to "terrorism"? The End of Faith by Sam Harris is a genuinely frightening book about terrorism, and the central role played by religion in justifying and ...
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Earring, don't use is or are? Pronouns “it” or “they”

I know that sunglasses, scissors, pants are plural. How about earring? If it's a pair (both left and right are alike), do we say "I love them" or "I love it"? I got a present from ...
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1answer
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When can I apply “their” to a singular noun? [duplicate]

At what times can I use plural "their" applying it to a singular noun? For example, I can say: Every student has his own learning curve and his own natural disposition. Can I also say ...
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Omit relative pronoun

Is this acceptable: The cat I see has a short tail. Or is the “that” necessary The cat that I see has a short tail. I don’t know why, but in past tense it sounds to me as if it was ok. Like: The ...
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2answers
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Why do they use “its” in reference to "borrower in the following sentence?

Credit risk has two components.The first is known as default risk, or default probability, which is the probability that a borrower defaults—that is, fails to meet its obligation to make full and ...
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There will be Jay, Jenny and I/me/myself at dinner

There will be Jay, Jenny and I/me/myself at dinner. Which is the most formal here?
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39 views

Who is 'his' in following context?

his = Bhagwant Singh, am I right? If I am right, why would he (Bhagwant Singh) dismantle his own fort? Upsurge in Hathras (1817) Dayaram, a talukdar of several villages in the district of Aligarh, ...
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1answer
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George became a writer of detective stories. (What / Which) did George become a writer of?

In the declarative sentence: George became a writer of detective stories. We changed it to interrogative sentence: (What / Which) did George become a writer of? Should I use What or Which?
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1answer
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May I replace “me” with “myself” in the sentence: I had brought suits with me?

May I replace me with myself in the sentence: I had brought suits with me? May I replace it? If I can, what's the difference between them?
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2answers
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Mismatch in pronouns grammatical?

Adults should learn their role in society even if you don't like to live in it. There's a mismatch in pronoun here, is this ok? I thought it was ok, because the pronoun you is general and can be used ...
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Why didn't delete 'it' in the sentence: What was it about snails that made the writer collect

What was it about snails that made the writer collect them for his friend on that day in particular? Why didn't delete it in the sentence above?
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“It is clear that most noticeable change that occurred in the town was that of a huge lake.”

It is clear that most noticeable change that occurred in the town was the change of a huge lake. It is clear that most noticeable change that occurred in the town was that of a huge lake. Is the ...
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1answer
35 views

Nothing vs. none (How much did you pay?)

I'd like to know why the answer to "How much did you pay?" is "nothing," rather than "none." As far as I can tell, the answer to how much/how many should normally be &...
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What’s the right ordering for the pronouns “he, you and I”?

He, you and I will go for a movie tomorrow. How to rearrange the pronouns in the best possible manner?
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2answers
260 views

Which pronoun (its or their) should be used for a single animal?

An otter can close its ears and nose. An otter can close their ears and nose. What is the difference? I think they are same and what is the correct answer?
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Is this sentence correct grammatically? “I want to buy a car, especially a red one made in America.”

I'm a Japanese learner of English. I have a question about an indefinite pronoun "one." Can "one" is used as follows? a(n) + an adjective + one + an adjective phrase (or an ...
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Interrogative/relative pronouns with accompanying pronouns

I understand this What are you asking for? However, in longer and more complicated sentences, you'd want to put that accompanying pronoun just before the interrogative/relative one. It's a ...
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1answer
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They vs it when talking about companies [duplicate]

X company offers the best coverage plans. They also offer great benefits. X company offers the best coverage plans. It also offers great benefits. Or X is a known company in the world of tech. They ...
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1answer
137 views

Meaning of any - one vs all [closed]

Lets say someone has 10 trading cards of a fictive trading card game in his hand. He plays a card with an effect. This effect says: You discard any of your cards and this effect is activated... Would ...
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1answer
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“I don't think there's someone home.” vs “I don't think there's anyone home.”

I saw this question on a test: "I don't think there's _________ home." One has to put a word in the empty space. So I thought to myself: someone or anyone? On one hand, my first reaction ...
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2answers
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“I will try to survive till that”

I will try to survive till that. My teacher (native) told me the THAT is not OK - and I have to find the good solution - this site is allowed. Possibly I would formulate on the following way, but I'm ...
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Does a following pronoun ALWAYS refer to the Subject of the previous sentence?

Q1. "Mr and Mrs Smith loved their children so much. And they were very happy." What does "they" refer to? Q2. "Mr and Mrs Smith loved their children so much. But they were not ...
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'which' refers to which one word?

It's a son of my friend which is twenty years old. In this sentence, which refers to which one, my friend or son? Is there any usual rule here? On the other hand, how can I do if I want to use which ...
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Is the word Mom here considered as that person's mom or is a person called mom?

Is the word Mom here considered as that person's mom or is a person called mom? Just wait until Mom sees this!
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What do these pronouns stand for?

With the advance of science, there has been a tendency to slip into scientism, and assume that any factual claim can be authenticated if and only if the term ‘scientific’ can correctly be ascribed to ...
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Does “The man saw the woman who is bringing the telescope” mean the woman is bringing the telescope?

The man saw the woman who is bringing the telescope. If "who" is with the woman, does this always mean the woman is being referred to, or it can also refer to the man, even though the "...
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1answer
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what does “that” mean?

The role of science can sometimes be overstated, with its advocates slipping into scientism. Scientism is the view that the scientific description of reality is the only truth there is. With the ...
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4answers
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“Outside there is a money receiver which only accepts coins” - or “that only accepts coins”? Which relative pronoun is better?

I'm preparing for academic IELTS by writing some essays and then correcting those using a grammar correction app. In the following sentence, Outside there is a money receiver which only accepts coins ...
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“This will be displayed when the device is next switched on” or “It will be displayed when the device is next switched on”

When the device is switched off, the memory will store the mode that last appeared on the screen. This (It?) will be displayed when the device is next switched on. Which is better, this or it, in ...
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1answer
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who vs. whom (vs. which) again - can whom be used as a subject of the sentence

Old English grammar books indicate a general rule of thumb for who vs whom - Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence. Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or ...
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1answer
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What are the nuances between using “odd,” “weird,” or “strange” here?

Question 1: What are the nuances between using odd, weird, or strange here? Question2: Is my example correct? Example: A: Did you win the lottery B: I won the jackpot. My family does not believe I ...
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Pronoun or noun?

In one of the Batman movies, the Joker greets someone as "Hello, beautiful". Is "beautiful" a pronoun in this case? If it is not, what would you call it? Thank you
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1answer
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What does “one” refer to in: “one that is subsequently rejected…”?

Here is a sentence from an LSAT: It draws an analogy between semiplaning monohulls and conventional ships that constitutes an objection to the argument's main conclusion, one that is subsequently ...
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2answers
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Can a pronoun refer a negative statement or a negative idea?

Can a pronoun refer a negative statement or a negative idea? To explain what I mean, down below are examples I came up with; are they correct? (1) A: She didn't get picked as a actress in the movie. ...
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1answer
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Doubts on the usage of the pronoun *which*

I have a few questions about the use of the pronoun which. In the sentence: A statistical model is a family of probability distributions of a random variable which is smoothly parametrized by a ...
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1answer
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A man such as yourself has acquired your own wealth vs A man such as yourself has acquired his own wealth?

A man such as yourself has acquired your own wealth vs A man such as yourself has acquired his own wealth? Which one is correct? I think it's the second one, but I'm not sure
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2answers
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What do the pronouns “that” and “its” refer to within the enclosed text?

I have been try­ing to un­der­stand this sen­tence, but it is a lit­tle too com­pli­cated for me to un­der­stand: In­di­vid­u­als ap­pear to have a knee-jerk re­flex­ive re­ac­tion to be­ing ex­...
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1answer
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Is the use of the pronoun “who” correct in the following sentence?

Sentence: "There was some doubt as to who the child's real father was." I have a feeling I should use whom instead: "There was some doubt as to whom the child's real father was." ...
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1answer
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Can two “it” in a sentence refer to two different nouns?

I am studying English, and I came across this example. "It would hardly be fair for the meatpacking industry to blame regulators for the harm that it has inflicted upon itself in the sub-prime ...
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1answer
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Few questions about how we can use “it” to refer to things

From my understanding of the use of "it", it has to be used after someone has used "this" or "that" to introduce the topic. My questions: (a) If the topic is already ...
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What does a relative pronoun refer to in the preceding sentence

Are both of these correct? I.e., can a relative pronoun refer to anything in the preceding sentence, or even earlier in the paragraph? "Bob went to Costco to buy some bread. It was delicious.&...
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1answer
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Is “he/his” for third person standard English when you don't know the person's gender?

I've read and heard that you can use they/their to refer to the person singular (someone, whoever, a student) when you don't know the gender of the person. Is it stand English to only use he/his? Ex.: ...
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2answers
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Using she/her for the word “moon”

I was reading a short story that contain these sentences: The moon said she was stronger. The sun did not agree with her. Do we always use "she" and "her" for moon? what is the ...
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2answers
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Which is correct “your” or “their” when combining questions?

What is one to do when they are locked out and therefore unable to access the Slack support channel, or have to email sysadmin from an address other than your work one? I came across the above ...
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1answer
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What is the referent of “it” in “under it”?

The following quote is from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen: Mr. Crawford, approaching Julia, said: "I hope I am not to lose my companion, unless she is afraid of the evening air in so exposed a ...
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1answer
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If…, that/this/it

What pronouns should be used to refer to the whole content of a preceding "if" clause? For example, Which pronoun should be used in the sentences below? i) If the vase did not fall over, it/...
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2answers
398 views

harder than “anyone” in his class or harder than “any other student” in his class?

A multiple choice question: He works harder than ____ in his class. Why would filling “anyone” there be wrong? And why would using "any other student" be right? I think it should be "...
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0answers
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write a short speech on each one or … every one?

From a multiple choice question: You should prepare a list of topics and write a short speech on ____ one. The correct one is each. But I am wondering why every can't be working here?

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