Skip to main content

Questions tagged [pronunciation]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the sound, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-1 votes
0 answers
18 views

Teaching English for Specific Purposes

I am teaching English to a cohort of safety officers who are at best of A2 level. After an observed class, I had a discussion with my DoS whether to give priority to language or content. I thought it ...
Feras Muhaidat's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Forgetting the pronunciation of certain words (expat)

As an English expat, I've noticed that especially over the last few years (I've been abroad for 8 years and counting) I've started to forget the exact pronunciation of certain words. It's annoying and ...
David's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
1 answer
45 views

Most of the verbs keep the suffix "e" because were used with the first-person singular in the Middle English

I’m uncertain about the ending "e" in the final form of many verbs.From the ChatGPT response: "The main factor behind the retention of the final "e" in many verbs is indeed ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
2 answers
508 views

Is there a difference in pronunciation between "It'd be" and "It be"?

I want to master pronouncing contractions to sound more natural. I think I know the technique to pronounce "It'd be", but to be honest, I'm not sure if it makes much difference to add a stop ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Which sound do you omit when pronouncing “asked” in “She asked me”?

When pronouncing the word “asked” in 'She asked me,' which consonant sound do you usually omit because it's too difficult for me to pronounce all four sounds (s+k+t+m)?
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,125
2 votes
1 answer
86 views

Do native-speakers not really vibrate their throats to pronounce those [ ʃ ] sounds in the words with ease?

Like "election" and "situation", their phonetic symbols are /ɪˈlekʃn/ and /ˌsɪtʃuˈeɪʃn/. Their common part is that when we pronounce them, at first we vibrate our throat, then stop ...
otakutyrant's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

pronunciation of wrist

I was watching the world championship snooker on television. Several times the commentators said things like "Great shot with the wrist" or "Kyren Wilson is strong with the wrist". ...
M. Wind's user avatar
  • 109
2 votes
2 answers
68 views

English pronunciation for "speak" vs "peak"

On paper, the words "speak" and "peak" should be pronounced the same (other than the "s") so why does the "p" in "peak" sound so much more explosive? /...
Siim Karel Koger's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
83 views

Variations of the [ə] sound (shwa)

I'm a Polish learner of English (especially British English). Some time ago, I started to regularly practice my pronunciation, and while most of the vowels aren't an issue to me already, there's still ...
axio9's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

How to pronounch "sth" or "ths"?

I find pronouncing words containing "sth" e.g. cloths or "sth" e.g. aesthetic quite challenging. Any tips to make it easier?
Real Dreams's user avatar
  • 2,235
0 votes
1 answer
104 views

How can I find words sound or spelled similar to a given word?

How can I find words that sound or are spelled similar to a given word? For example, given "enervate", I remember seeing words spelled or pronounced similarly, but I can't recall which ones. ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,841
1 vote
2 answers
132 views

What is the standard British pronunciation taught at schools?

When I was learning English at school in Russia, we were taught the pronunciation of "British English", remaining unaware that there are hundreds of accents in Britain. Now I know that there'...
Ruslan's user avatar
  • 557
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Pronunciation of coitize [closed]

I have not ever heard this word, but I see it in print from time to time. Wiktionary, where I normally go to look up a word, does not list a pronunciation. Etymologically, apparently, the co- is a ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
118 views

List of words with the FOOT vowel

Trying to compile an easy-to-memorize list of the words that use the FOOT /ʊ/ vowel for the use of someone who has trouble figuring out where to use that and where the GOOSE /u/ vowel. Only listing ...
Roman Odaisky's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

What is the stressed syllable in perseverance?

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/perseverance perseverance UK /ˌpɜː.sɪˈvɪə.rəns/ US /ˌpɝː.səˈvɪr.əns/ Why is the stress on vɪr not on sə?
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,841
1 vote
0 answers
77 views

what make "and I" sounds like "ne" and "that" sounds like "de" to me? [duplicate]

According to the Wikipedia introduction, the speaker is a British-American computer scientist and an adjunct professor at Stanford University. So I think he is pronunciation is rather native, at ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 853
1 vote
1 answer
104 views

Is It a common way to say "to be" as "[tuː][buː]"?

I just notice the speaker pronounce "to be" as "[tuː][buː]" in the sentence. I think "to be" could be pronounced as "[tuːbi]" or [tu:bə]. why in the audio the ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 853
-1 votes
1 answer
65 views

Why Mx is spoken as mɪks instead of mks?

In the dictionary -- https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/mx Mx in British English (mɪks IPA Pronunciation Guide IPA Pronunciation Guide , məks IPA Pronunciation Guide ) noun a title ...
showkey's user avatar
  • 1,489
1 vote
2 answers
151 views

'a/an' before acronyms: British vs American

I learned English grammar by reading a few books published by OUP (a British organization/company). According to the books, what determines whether 'a' or 'an' is used before a countable noun is not ...
apadana's user avatar
  • 305
3 votes
2 answers
151 views

Is it my ears or is it the narrator pronouncing"...JAGGED CLIFFS" something like ".... JAG IL TIFFS."?

Cornered, the seals keep close to the jagged cliffs. BBC (see:1:19-1:23) I listened to it more than 10 times and suprised to hear the "...jagged cliffs" was pronounced something like ".....
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
11 votes
4 answers
2k views

In almost all dictionaries the transcription of "solely" has two "L" — [ˈs ə u l l i]. Does it mean to say "solely" with one "L" is unnatural?

The transcription of "solely" is [ˈsəʊlli]. The fact that there are two "L" perplexes me. Is it unnatural for you to pronounce "solely" with one "L"? (I mean: [...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,921
10 votes
4 answers
4k views

Isn't it convenient to pronounce "-man" in "salesman" and "-men" in "salesmen" differently as you do it in "man [mæn]" and "men [men]"?

"Man" and "men" are different in pronunciation: man [mæn] men [men] As are some other word pairs: handyman [ˈhændimæn] handymen [ˈhændimen] bogeyman [ˈbəʊɡimæn] bogeymen [ˈbəʊɡimen]...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,921
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

Stress of word 'flagrant' /ˈfleɪɡrənt/ is Flagrant or FLAgrant or something else?

Stress of word 'flagrant' /ˈfleɪɡrənt/ is Flagrant or FLAGrant or something else? My problem is I don't know stress at f (Flagrant) or fleɪ (FLAgrant) (separation of sounds, because as you seen, it is ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
137 views

What are the meanings of dot in word what show in Oxford Dictionary advanced learners for mobile?

What are the meanings of dot in word what show in Oxford Dictionary advanced learners for mobile (licensed subscription)? Example word: ability . Web version of Oxford dictionary for advanced ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
1 vote
3 answers
193 views

How to explain, "listen" has 5 sounds while its pronunciation is `/ˈlɪsn/`? Why not 4 sounds?

Book Cambridge pronunciation in Use Elementary, at Section B, item A3c In some words there are silent letters (letters with no sound). In listen, t is silent. listen 6 letters, 5 sounds +---+---+---+...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
89 views

Position of stress in 3-letter-abbreviation: BBC and DVD

Book "English pronunciation in use - Advance" [E1] page 40: (1) the ˌBBˈC (2) He works for the BBˈC. (3) He works for ˈBBC RAdio. Book "Oxford Word skill - intermediate - 1st edition&...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
2 votes
1 answer
121 views

Why /ˈlem.ən/ (Cambridge dictionary - UK voice) but read like /ˈlemən/ (Oxford dictionary - UK voice)?

I am learning at English Pronunciation in Use - Advanced. I seen Why /ˈlem.ən/ (Cambridge dictionary - UK voice) but read like /ˈlemən/ (Oxford dictionary - UK voice)? I feel dot . in /ˈlem.ən/ was ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
2 votes
0 answers
200 views

Why does this British speaker pronounce the word "gerund" as "/gerUND/" instead of /dʒɛrənd/?

This is from a British speaker who teaches speaking skills to millions of students. In one of his videos, he mentions the word "gerund" but he pronounces it "/gerUND/". Speaking ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Different pronunciations of "disputes"

Recently I have come across an outtake from a YouTube video about different pronunciations of the word "disputes" depending on the context. According to my understanding from that video: &...
LW001's user avatar
  • 101
4 votes
2 answers
548 views

Do you ever put stress on the auxiliary verb in AUX + NOT?

Do you ever put stress on the auxiliary verbs in do not, may not, will not, should not, etc. without contracting them? If we take a look at don't, can't, won't, shouldn't, for example, the n't part ...
Detaroit's user avatar
  • 185
-2 votes
1 answer
65 views

Is it a pronunciation mistake in Trump's inauguration speech? [duplicate]

Did Trump here mistakenly pronounce the "~ing ou~" of We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies, and destroying our jobs. ...
shepherd's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
97 views

Tu in opportunity as /tu/? [closed]

I heard some people pronounce tu in opportunity as /tu/ which I find a drastically un-unexpected way of pronunciation. Why is that? update: don't get upset, the question is not about accent. It's ...
Real Dreams's user avatar
  • 2,235
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Pronouncing "Scallywag"

I am old enough to have seen "Mischief Makers" (=Our Gang/Little Rascals, mostly German version, but I also know the original: Youtube). Back then I of course didn't know what a scallywag is,...
Hauke Reddmann's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
215 views

Why does Wagner begin with a "w" and not a "v"?

Private Military Company Wagner has made headlines ever since the escalation of the armed conflict in Ukraine. I have watched and listened to multiple news outlets report on its activities. Some read ...
jch55044's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Can you turn a declarative sentence into a interrogative sentence with changing pronunciation type or way of tone? [duplicate]

Looks like you can change a declarative sentence to interrogative by changing your way of speech. I have come across this several times, What do you think? Hey man, How's it going? -Hey fine, And you?...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

Reference for pronunciation of nicknames

Is there a reference for first names and surnames in English? I have lots of firstnames and surnames in my book (e.g. Juan, Sri, Elena, Robert and so on) but I don't know how to pronounce them in ...
mohamadi_arch's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
134 views

Do you pronounce the "l" in "cool", "school", etc?

The IPA for "cool" is /ku:l/ and for school is /sku:l/. There is the /l/ sound in both words according to the IPA. However, an American friend of mine told me that native speakers don't ...
A Slow Learner's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
2k views

Why is the tag question positive in this dialogue from Downton Abbey? "Then we must be ready by tomorrow, must we?"

In this clip (2:28) of Downton Abbey you can hear Sybil saying: Then we must be ready by tomorrow, must we? Now, if she's using a tag question, why isn't she forming the negative? Maybe I'm ...
Dog_69's user avatar
  • 193
3 votes
1 answer
449 views

Is it okay always to pronunce unstressed vowels as schwa?

Recently I am reading Mastering the American Accent by Lisa Mojsin. Here are some quotes from this book: The vowel within the unstressed syllable is reduced and becomes a neutral, short vowel called ...
chenzhongpu's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
60 views

Do you pronounce discount or disgount?

I learned in English class that you should change pronunciation, k to g, t to d and p to b, that is immediately after s in spoken English, like express -> exbress and skill -> sgill. I am using ...
Chenxi's user avatar
  • 21
20 votes
5 answers
6k views

How do you read "10/10"?

How do you read "10/10", as in "10/10, no notes"? it is a score! The "no notes" comes from the acting community, I think: you've done so well, that the director has no ...
Cocobop's user avatar
  • 211
11 votes
6 answers
9k views

Why does this native speaker (Youtuber) say "...a island" but not "...an island": "I thought the 50 grand was getting me a island."

This is from an American Youtuber's video. Mr. Beast comparing most expensive and the cheapest hotels (see: 4:06-4:08) In the video, they compare the cheapest and the most expensive hotels, and while ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
1 vote
2 answers
81 views

Flapped T in the word “appetite”

In the word “appetite” T is between 2 vowels and it’s not flapped T according to Oxford American English dictionary. Why?
Nak's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
2 answers
116 views

Is it "When the wicked" or "devil a wicked" in "Rivers of Babylon: Boney M"?

I am studying English with the song "Rivers of Babylon: Boney M". I can't hear well the "When the wicked" part. It sounds like "devil a wicked" to me, but the text is &...
hohyun's user avatar
  • 9
2 votes
3 answers
203 views

What is the right pronunciation of "planned"?

Today in my English class my teacher taught us about the "plan" verb using it in present perfect. I was curious what is the right pronunciation of "planned" in American or British ...
learnerg5's user avatar
7 votes
6 answers
2k views

Should convert 'k' and 't' sounds to 'g' and 'd' sounds when they follow 's' in a word for pronunciation?

Should convert 'k' and 't' sounds to 'g' and 'd' sounds when they follow 's' in a word for pronunciation? For example, stamp is pronounced as 's dæm p', etc.
Xuesong Gao's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
294 views

How do I say "An aspect ratio of 4:3" and proportions?

When you deal with images you have to mention aspect ratios, that are written as "16:9", "4:3" etc. and image dimensions that are written as "480x320", "3840x2160&...
Duck's user avatar
  • 615
4 votes
1 answer
787 views

Why does "sub" prefix have two different pronunciations?

The title tells the story! As an English learner I noticed that some words consisting the "sub" are sometimes pronounced slightly different. For example according to the Merriam-Webster (...
Qaher's user avatar
  • 153
0 votes
2 answers
38 views

Understanding the language of pronunciation [duplicate]

In most of the dictionaries apart from the meaning of the word, there is also a list of characters that tell how to pronounce the word. Is there a specific name for those things? How to understand ...
nicku's user avatar
  • 775
0 votes
0 answers
112 views

Struggling to pronounce words ending with "sts"

When it comes to plural words ending with "sts" (e.g. "Scientists", "Atheists", "Priests"), It becomes very difficult for me to pronounce the "sts" ...
AmirWG's user avatar
  • 201

1
2 3 4 5
24