Questions tagged [pronunciation]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the sound, intonation, and stress of how words are uttered or produced.

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1answer
43 views

-ctly pronunciation in British (ex. exactly, correctly etc.)

I have a question about the pronunciation of these words in British accent; exactly, correctly etc. I am more familiar with the American accent, so I tend to ignore the 't' between two consonants. Do ...
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2answers
35 views

At which point does mispronunciation become accent?

A while back, when I was talking to one friend of mine (we are both English language learners), he "mispronounced" a word so I pointed it out. He responses with something like "Well, I ...
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1answer
36 views

Words with 'oo' that aren't pronouced as [ʊ]

I'm looking for words that has double o, but aren't pronounced as [ʊ]. (aren't like moon, goose, school) Ideally is there a rule, or even a hint for finding these kind of words? Looking at the ...
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0answers
23 views

Is “ScU Sub” an alliteration?

The "S" in "ScU" is [es], while the "S" in "Sub" is [s]. Therefore, I'm not sure whether it is an alliteration. ScU is Sichuan University. I'm considering "...
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2answers
90 views

The silent “u”: “forty” and “fourteen”

We all know that the cardinal and ordinal numbers 4 and 4th are spelled ‘four’ and “fourth” respectively. Then we have 14 and 14th which are spelled “fourteen” and “fourteenth”. Yet the numbers 40 and ...
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4answers
79 views

Linking pronunciation: ‘linked to’

How to pronounce ‘linked to’? I assume ed+t should be linked? Or is it ok to be pronounced separately. How about ‘linked them’? I can tell there is some difference between ‘link to’ and ‘linked to’ ...
2
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1answer
50 views

How to pronounce “Stannis's”? [duplicate]

I know that the "s" becomes "z" when it comes after a voiced sound. And it is pronounced as "s" when it comes after a voiceless sound. I also know rules about possessives ...
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2answers
67 views

How is the name 'Margie' pronounced?

'Margie' is a diminutive form of Margaret /m'a: grit/. It is normally pronounced as [mˈɑːdʒi] by the native speakers. Some other derivatives include Maggie, Meg, Megan, etc. Now, all of these have the ...
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4answers
134 views

Can I always drop the T and the D at the end of verbs in the past (or past participle) tense when they come between two consonants sounds?

I am Brazilian and I'm trying to improve my English-speaking skills. I having a tough time linking verbs in the past tense to words starting with consonants other than T and D. I learned that many ...
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1answer
51 views

Word(s) in which 'V' is pronounced /f/

I was reading this question and it reminded me of a word (I've forgotten now) which was the opposite of that question i.e. a word in which the letter V is pronounced /f/. I racked my brain for about ...
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1answer
87 views

Why are the vowels in “sense”, “nonsense” and “nonsensical” pronounced differently?

I'm a bit confused by these words. Since "nonsense" derives from "sense" but the vowel in "sense" is /ɛ/ and it reduces to /ə/ in "nonsense". BUT "...
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2answers
221 views

On the meaning of YgUDuh by E.E. Cummings

I'm currently trying to understand E.E. Cummings Poem "YgUDuh": ygUDuh ydoan yunnuhstan ydoan o yunnuhstand dem yguduh ged yunnuhstan dem doidee yguduh ged riduh ydoan o nudn LISN bud LISN ...
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0answers
17 views

“Asks” pronunciation in sentence [duplicate]

How do you pronounce “asks” in “She asks too many questions”? Is it possible to omit the “s” while we are speaking?
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1answer
52 views

The pronunciation of English consonants

Do native speakers not pronounce the final consonants in words? For example, the "d" in "bad" and "g" in "ing" in "interesting" or "speaking&...
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5answers
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Why is the t in “often” silent?

Cambridge online dictionary pronounces "often" without the "t" but also gives the pronunciation with the t. I checked in many other dictionaries but it is silent. UK: /ˈɒf.ən/ /ˈɒf....
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1answer
37 views

POME GRANATE or pom o gra nate

What is the pronunciation of pomegranate? When I check the dictionaries for the pronunciation, its different from the way the native speakers pronounce it. I'm confused what pronunciation should I use....
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1answer
107 views

Are /s/ and /z/ really distinguishable at the end of a word?

I know /z/ is voiced and /s/ is not, but many times I heard /s/ when it should be /z/. For example, the word "yours", according to IPA, should be pronounced yourz /jɔːz/, but I almost always ...
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2answers
2k views

'Me' vs 'my' [pronunciation] in British English

I noticed that British people sometimes use me instead of my. For example, Liam Gallagher does it quite often. Example: The wind was strong I have nearly lost me pants What is a story behind this ...
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2answers
71 views

How to pronounce the “n” in “wasn't really…” fast?

When people say "wasn't really" really fast, does the tongue position for /n/ in "wasn't" exactly the same as an usual /n/? (like in this description.) I ask this question because ...
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0answers
73 views

How can I differentiate the american R from the american W?

I followed some guides fro the pronunciation of the american R, as a result of which my R sounds just like a W. What is the difference between them?
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1answer
44 views

Common words where TH is not pronounced as TH?

I've recently been told that the word "clothes" is actually pronounced as "close", because an American friend heard me saying it with a voiced TH sound. The thing is I usually can'...
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1answer
41 views

Are past participles in -thed ever pronounced -ðid?

Do native speakers ever (erroneously) pronounce past participles in -thed, such as bathed and clothed, as -ðid rather than -ðd? If so, how prevalent is this?
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3answers
935 views

Pronunciation of past participles of words that end with 'thed' (e.g. bathed)

How does one pronounce past participles in -thed, such as "clothed" and "bathed" in British English? Are there more than one correct pronunciation? A Cambridge dictionary said [-ðd]...
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1answer
40 views

Standing in “fries” of me?

In Christina Perri's song A Thousand Years, according to all lyrics websites at 1:46 the lyrics is "standing in front of me". https://youtu.be/rtOvBOTyX00?t=106 But to my ear she clearly ...
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2answers
60 views

How are transliterated words pronounced: as they are in the origin language or according to the recipient language's rules?

How are transliterated words pronounced: as they are in the origin language or according to the recipient language's rules? Say, we have a Soviet multiple rocket launcher "Buk". In Russian, ...
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1answer
115 views

the pronunciation of “gripe”

Cambridge Dictionary gives IPA symbol /ɡraɪp/ for "gripe" while Merriam-Webster gives /ˈgraɪp/. Both audio clips on them sound like grape, at least sound closer to grape than to white. When ...
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0answers
26 views

Is “status 1” pronounced “status of one”

In a tutorial, it sounds like "non-zero exit status 1" is pronounced "non zero exit status of one", with the pattern xx of number when talking about a number-value of something. ...
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1answer
93 views

Are there any differences in the ways of speaking English by men and women? Any typical examples?

In Japan, my home country, men and women speak slightly differently in terms of word choice and how to end a sentence, to give you just a few examples. This is especially true in informal situations. ...
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2answers
76 views

How to pronounce “another thing”

When you pronounce "another thing", should you pronounce the "r" at the end of another?
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1answer
47 views

“one thousand feet” or “one thousand foot”

According to a post Phoebe lives less than 1000' from the coffeehouse. When speaking, should I pronounce one thousand feet or one thousand foot?
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1answer
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“for” vs. “fur”

In a scene of Friends Season 2 Episode 1, Phoebe helps Monica Cheats on Rachel and says went shopping for fur Those two words sound the same. According to Merriam-Webster, fur is pronounced /ˈfɚ/, ...
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3answers
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silent syllables in AmE and BrE

From Cambridge Dictionary, the word "comfortable" is pronounced /ˈkʌm.fɚ.t̬ə.bəl/, while some native speakers would pronounce it /ˈkʌm.ft̬ə.bəl/, which means "for" in the word is ...
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1answer
68 views

How to tell apart ɝ and ɛ?

Today I discovered the word "scurry" and I immediately found that I couldn't tell it apart with "scary". I looked it up and found that it boils down to differentiating ɝ and ɛ, at ...
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0answers
30 views

Free to use collection of English words' pronunciations (to be used in an English teaching app)

I am building an English teaching app and I need pronunciations of the words for free so that I can use them in my app without Copyright infringement.
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1answer
44 views

the sound of “pfft” in real life

I think I know, but I'm not sure. Dictionary sound is different from real life. Does it sound like "chi"? (weirdly I couldn't find this with google or youtube)
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1answer
61 views

How to pronounce “Karl Wilhelm Bücher” in american english?

How to pronounce "Karl Wilhelm Bücher" in american english? please use the standard phonetics Karl Wilhelm Bücher (16 February 1847, Kirberg, Hesse – 12 November 1930, Leipzig, Saxony) was a ...
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1answer
59 views

How common is it for a native speaker to use “i.e.” in their conversation?

How common is "i.e." in everyday conversation? If so, How do native speakers pronounce it? "id est" or something else?
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1answer
41 views

Please help me with my dictation. He's British

very short, only voice, British I'm hearing... A: doing that blah blah 45? B: that's plenty of time I'm watching a British cooking show program Situation is, there's three people in a team and one ...
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0answers
43 views

A strange lesson from a bilingual American. About article “the”

I just have happened to have found this video. He is teaching English in Japanese TV and is saying he is frustrated about every time he speaks the as in "thə" (which should grammatically be ...
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2answers
67 views

Does a following consonant cancel the preceding consonant?

According to a tutorial, we can link /d/ to /t/ or /t/ to /d/ in speech, for example, I need two kilos of shrimp. the /t/ sound in "two" cancels the /d/ sound in "need". She ...
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0answers
15 views

How common is the glottal t pronunciation in British English compared to the /t/ sound?

How common is the glottal t pronunciation in British English compared to the /t/ sound? I've heard both of them, but I'm not sure what frequency they represent. Does one of them represent more formal ...
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0answers
52 views

Is it common to omit “it's” in spoken American?

From a tutorial it's just time to move on It sounds like "it's" is completely omitted. Is it common in spoken American?
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2answers
102 views

Is it common to pronounce two /tjuː/?

The word "two" in a tutorial sounds like /tjuː/ at multiple positions. Is it common to pronounce two /tjuː/? Another tutorial uses the same pronunciation. I want you to listen to English through ...
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1answer
29 views

“how comes down” vs. “It all comes down”

Meaning of come down on Cambridge Dictionary to fall and land on the ground A tutorial sounds like This is why Hebrew may come across as aggressive, but it's basically the way we stress words....
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1answer
23 views

read that time point of a video

Should I use present continuous or present simple tense here to describe an action in a video? says At 1:19, he's holding the ball, and then drop it freely down to his foot Should I read that time ...
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1answer
25 views

“equivalent” pronunciation of pairs of words

This "The Langage Nerds" post illustrates many "same pronunciation different meaning" pairs of words. While most seem reasonable to me, I'm surprised by some, and wonder if there is some USA's bias or ...
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0answers
43 views

It seems that British people do not have inclination to pronounce some “r”, but why?

Why British people do not pronounce most "r" which is mostly located at the the end of word? for example : There: UK /ðeə(r)/ and US /ðer/ therefrom: UK /ˌðeəˈfrɒm/ and US /ˌðerˈfrɑːm/ More:UK ...
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5answers
232 views

How do you pronounce 2'' x 9/2" x 8' (board)?

I called Home Depot to reserve some wood. This is my exact requirement: 2" x 9/2" x 8ft. I told them over the phone many times "I am calling to make sure if you have four 2 inch times 9 inch ...
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1answer
47 views

An interesting teaching by a native speaker

Watching this video,, in which a native speaker is teaching Japanese learners about English, The teacher is saying about "Wait a minute", from 3:16~ Wait a minute = Waitamini(small t) To me ...
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1answer
55 views

English Pronunciation of “Employé”

I've read a number of older books in which I see the work "employé" being used where we would today use "employee". The meaning in all cases was obvious. Example: "You seem most fortunate in having ...

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