Questions tagged [proper-nouns]

For questions relating to things that have a name used for an individual person, place, or organization. It is typically spelled with initial capital letters.

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53
votes
4answers
12k views

Why is Zika capitalized and chikungunya and yellow fever are not?

I noticed the usage on the CDC website. I don't understand why Zika is capitalized while the other two were in lower cases. There is no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat chikungunya virus ...
43
votes
5answers
5k views

"The Jesus who said" - why is there a definite article before the proper name "Jesus"?

The system doesn't seem to be providing for the well-being of all the people, and that's what makes it, almost in its very nature, something contrary to the Jesus who said, "Blessed are the poor. Woe ...
36
votes
5answers
7k views

Why is "science" in "Bachelor of Science" singular, whereas "arts" in "Bachelor of Arts" is plural?

In the following degrees — "Bachelor of Science" and "Master of Science" — "science" is an uncountable or singular noun. In contrast, in "Bachelor of Arts" and ...
26
votes
9answers
5k views

"No more Hiroshima" or "No more Hiroshimas"

"No more Hiroshima" or "No more Hiroshimas". Some say the former and some say the latter. I'm wondering which is grammatically correct.
16
votes
5answers
102k views

"The USA" versus "USA"

People on the Internet say that it's based on the context, but they suggest the form without the. However, when I read the Wikipedia article, the first sentence is the following: The United ...
15
votes
2answers
311k views

"I and John" vs. "John and myself" vs. "John and I" -- Which is the acceptable way to refer to myself and my friend?

I need to find out which one of these ways to refer to me and a friend in one sentence is correct? I and John... John and myself... John and I...
15
votes
4answers
9k views

Using THE before some countries

I have been taught that it's grammatically proper to use the before countries like "Sudan and Yemen" but I was never given a reason (if there exists any, of course) when I asked why, except for "it is ...
15
votes
2answers
2k views

Using "south" when referring to the southern part of a place

In Italian, if I am referring to Southern Europe, I could say Sud Europa (literally "South Europe"), or Europa meridionale. Is South Europe acceptable in English, or could I say "the south of Europe"...
14
votes
1answer
2k views

(The) Putin's ratings shot up. Is the definite article allowed here?

In a sentence where the definite article precedes someone's name, as in this example: The war campaign has boosted the Putin's ratings. could the definite article be used? Would the above example ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

“I like the USA” or “I like USA”? [duplicate]

Use the if the country’s name includes a common noun. I know that we have to use "the" in front of some countries and USA is one of them. But it sounds odd to say "I like the USA". Please tell me ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

No more Hiroshimas - Can proper nouns be plural form?

No more Hiroshima - I have listened that is not wrong, but this is different to what I'm aiming for. Instead of it, I can say 'no more Hiroshimas'. I have a question about it. Why is Hiroshima ...
9
votes
3answers
46k views

Why aren't currency names capitalized?

It's Australian dollar and not Australian Dollar, It's Indian rupee and not Indian Rupee, it's Japanese yen and not Japanese Yen and so on. I know that... Proper nouns are capitalized. Aren't ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Question about "the" before names

For example I want to discuss one movie called "A" (it's just an example name) with my friend. Do I need to use the definite article before its name. Example: I want to talk about the "A" with you (...
8
votes
2answers
200 views

Using "the" instead of "a" for something that isn't a specific object

I've been curious about this for a while. Generally, one uses "the" if they mean a specific object ("The copy of Lord of the Rings I bought yesterday") instead of any object that fits a description ("...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Definite article with "9/11"

Could one use the definite article with 9/11? This is an example sentence composed by me: The author traces the origins of modern terrorism back to the late 19th century, but he admits that (the) ...
7
votes
2answers
513 views

Articles before modified proper nouns

Nevertheless, Harry was determined to find out more about Riddle, so next day at break, he headed for the trophy room to examine Riddle’s special award, accompanied by an interested Hermione and a ...
7
votes
2answers
24k views

Is the name of a disease considered a proper noun?

I've never really thought about it before now, but is the name of a disease considered a proper noun, and thus, should the first letters be capitalized? For example: Would it be "celiac disease" or "...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

How do I pluralize a proper noun that is also an English word?

There is a card in Magic: the Gathering called Rally the Ancestors. My friends and I refer to the card by its shortened name, "Rally". The plural form of rally when used as a regular word is rallies. ...
7
votes
1answer
877 views

When should one use articles with adjective+proper noun?

I've always thought that we don't use articles when the adjective is descriptive as in "Welcome to fabulous Las Vegas". And that we do use them when the adjective makes the proper noun different from ...
6
votes
1answer
276 views

before we get to yuppie -- why no article in front of "yuppie"?

Source: short audio clip Transcript: So, what is a yuppie? Well, actually before we get to yuppie, we need to go back in time. Let's go back all the way to the 1940s. Now, a couple months ago, in ...
6
votes
2answers
4k views

Is "coach" a proper noun in this case?

I'm not going to play next year if coach makes me ride the pine again this season. (source) The sentence syntactically suggests "coach" has to be a proper noun, although it is not capitalized. It ...
6
votes
1answer
383 views

Why are lakes called "Lake Soandso" but seas are called "Soandso Sea"?

I am an English teacher for Brazilians. I was explaining the Great Lakes, and after that I mentioned the sea in Europe and noticed that the names were in a reversed order: Which of the great lakes ...
5
votes
3answers
14k views

Articles with the days of the week: "Is it a Monday today?"

Is it possible to come up with a context for this sentence. "Is it a Monday today?" I know it is usually "Is it Monday today?" but I also know that articles can be used with the days of the week. So, ...
5
votes
1answer
695 views

What do you call the place where you tie a horse?

Can anyone please tell me what is the exact word for this type of arrangement to tie a horse? Or is it just called a stable? [Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/reddeadredemption/comments/a1hcyo/...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Capitalizing family members' names (i.e. nouns, NOT proper nouns)

My daughter's English text book has a note which reads if you are directly talking to a person about the only person in your house, it can be capitalized. For example: "Mommy, have you seen my ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Why are some common nouns' first letters being used capital?

I am reading "The Orphan Child". On the first page there is a sentence which seems fine to me. But I think I should clear the air and make sure am with the writer on the same page. My question is ...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

Using article "the" with famous places?

I'm editing a children's book about wonders of the World. In this book, the authors are not native speakers(they are XACT BOOK(India)), and they wrote these specific places without article "the": -...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

How do you pronounce names?

How can I figure out how to pronounce a name? Are there any dictionaries for names which tell us how words are articulated? Are there rules to follow to figure it out? For example, I need to know how ...
5
votes
1answer
160 views

Is 'A dead [Proper Noun]' okay?

I've read it at many places. I'm not sure whether they were authentic sources. But in any case, is it grammatical to say 'A dead [proper noun]'? Say, A dead Michael Jackson I mean an indefinite ...
4
votes
3answers
784 views

Is 'a' implying one of the family?

Mr. Dursley hummed as he picked out his most boring tie for work, and Mrs. Dursley gossiped away happily as she wrestled a screaming Dudley into his high chair. (Harry Potter) Why is ‘a’ put, ...
4
votes
2answers
434 views

Is there any rule for shortening of names of people? [closed]

In Louisa May Alcott's novel Little Women, four sisters are named Jo, Meg, Amy and Beth respectively, but later I realized their full names are Josephine, Margaret, Amy and Elizabeth respectively. The ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

India Prime Minister Vs. Indian Prime Minister Vs. India's Prime Minister

I have read all of them and they all tell the same thing. The Prime Minster of India. But then, which one is better to use. To me, grammatically, all mean different! India Prime Minister -what sort ...
4
votes
2answers
245 views

How to express "Anonymous" when functioning as a proper noun?

Quite a few Chinese novels and movies don't name the main character (or one of the main characters) as Mike or Alice or any name alike. Instead, he/she is called "无名氏". In general, 无名氏= ...
4
votes
1answer
262 views

"Is Peter's party on a Sunday?" Why is the indefinite article used?

I saw this sentence in a primary school English textbook: Is Peter's party on a Sunday? I wondered why they put an "a" before Sunday. The teacher said it was correct but didn't explain. Could ...
4
votes
6answers
17k views

When to use 'the' in front of a country? [duplicate]

Citizens of the Lithuania, sounds wrong. Citizens of the Russia too. However, citizens of the Ukraine, sounds right. Also of the United States (of America) as well as of the United Kingdom. What is ...
4
votes
1answer
578 views

Adams are four brothers

Adam is a person's name. So, can I say: Adams are four brothers. In my language it's possible. We always make plural of people's names.
4
votes
2answers
190 views

"The Collins French Gem Grammar" and "Collins French Gem Grammar" -- why use an article?

Source: The Collins French Gem Grammar offers the learner of French extensive coverage of French grammar in a compact, portable format with a clear, colour layout. Collins French Gem Grammar has ...
4
votes
1answer
382 views

Are all city names ending in CESTER pronounced as STER?

I have heard all the names of English city names ending in CESTER pronounced as STER but I wonder if it is a "rule" and I should pronounce all of them as STER? Gloucester, Leicester, and ...
4
votes
1answer
927 views

How do I refer to the people living in the particular city? Is it random always?

Where do demonyms come from? At times they take -ite, some times -an, -er and this one is jaw-dropping '-siders!' A person living in New York is a New Yorker (-er) A person living in Delhi is ...
4
votes
3answers
73 views

Choosing a shop name [closed]

Which one is more grammatically correct as a shop name, Valhalla’s Dojo or Valhalla Dojo? It’s a name for a game centre. My partners and I can’t seem to agree on this.
3
votes
3answers
994 views

What is the name of the box which keeps software CD?

I don't know its exact name or how do you call this box in English: The CDs inside the box are essential and required to be installed before the paid hardware can fully function. I don't own this box....
3
votes
3answers
687 views

Putting proper nouns in all capitals

I've sometimes seen proper nouns put in all capital letters. And it's not because the entire sentence is in capitals, or because the person is "shouting". For example, I've seen in the CIA factbook ...
3
votes
2answers
222 views

'The' with noun expressions containing personal names

It is often not clear whether to use the definite article when a personal name is used. Tolstoy's books. — It is John's property. — Somewhere in Steinbeck country. but... The ...
3
votes
3answers
596 views

Do you pronounce foreigners' names with the foreign pronunciation?

Some names, like "Michael" sound dramatically different depending on whether you pronounce them the German or English way. Which one do you use when talking in English?
3
votes
2answers
468 views

Why there is an indefinite article "We have a Hulk"

Loki: I have an army. Tony Stark: We have a Hulk. (The Avengers quote on IMDB) I just can't get why Stark uses an indefinite article with a real person in a phrase "We have a Hulk", is this ...
3
votes
2answers
894 views

(The) Soup Of The Day

Suppose that you own a restaurant and you want to make a particular soup for each day of the week, and you want to capitalize the name on the menu (as if it's a proper name or a unique title or ...
3
votes
1answer
97 views

We America.... and not We Americans -what is this special use?

I was reading articles on the New York Times and found this. None of this means we, America, just have to do what the world wants, but we do have to take it seriously, and we do have to be good ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Do you say Industrialist Henry Ford or the industrialist Henry Ford?

Do you say Industrialist Henry Ford or the industrialist Henry Ford? I have been speaking English in the US for 8 years now. The pattern I am seeing is that when you call someone by placing their ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Makeup, make-up or make up?

Make up course, make-up course, makeup course - I mean something like make up course. I have to include this in my CV and I don't know which version is correct.
3
votes
2answers
1k views

A proper noun with an indefinite article -is it a rare case?

Proper nouns don't take indefinite articles -simple and straightforward. But then, I came across a sentence while searching for some examples as I was pondering over this question. I learned that at ...